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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Louise Canning and Isabelle Szmigin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the contribution of network competence to radical innovation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the contribution of network competence to radical innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Technological change associated with human body disposal acts as the form of radical innovation in which network competence is examined. Interviews, observations at industry conferences and secondary data are used for the case studies featured and in which network competence is investigated.

Findings

The paper establishes the importance of network competence at the regime and landscape level and the contribution of actors within commercial innovation niches to bringing cremation alternatives to market.

Research limitations/implications

Some of the results are particular to the challenges of network entry and product introduction facing business start-ups and the context of body disposal is unique. Further research should examine network competence and radical innovation in other business fields.

Social implications

Firstly, the context of human body disposal highlights the importance of institutional actors and social systems in bringing cremation alternatives to market. Secondly, focusing on human disposal encourages exchange amongst readers on a subject which is fundamental to man’s existence, yet the discussion of which many might normally choose to avoid.

Originality/value

The paper connects two areas of academic interest, namely, niche management for sustainability and radical innovation in business markets in which networking and network competence are key to the commercialisation of innovation.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2019

Helen McGrath, Thomas O'Toole and Louise Canning

This paper aims to explore coopetition as a fundamental feature of the collaborative dynamics inherent in entrepreneurial ventures. The authors present a conceptual model…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore coopetition as a fundamental feature of the collaborative dynamics inherent in entrepreneurial ventures. The authors present a conceptual model and definition of entrepreneurial coopetition, the latter being explained as entrepreneurial involvement in simultaneous cooperative and competitive interactions with business network actors in a relational environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the micro-brewing industry in a Southern State in the USA, as an empirical base, the authors use an abductive case study approach drawing from multiple data sources including semi-structured interviews, marketing materials, information available on websites and social media, as well as information contained in newspaper articles and policy documents.

Findings

Findings suggest that entrepreneurs habitually interact in a coopetitive manner through norms formed in interaction and that these are often in response to the environment.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are limited to one particular context. Future research could include entrepreneurs from other sectors, state or country contexts which may reveal other coopetition themes.

Practical implications

More benefits in coopetition could be reaped if the entrepreneur were more cognitively aware of, and strategically planned for, the coopetitive processes in which they are (or could be) engaged.

Originality/value

The authors open the black box of entrepreneurial coopetition by putting forward and empirically examining a conceptual definition of entrepreneurial coopetition. This work moves the coopetition discussion beyond the motives behind and consequences of coopetition, analysing interactions from a process perspective. The authors respond to recent calls for a deeper understanding of coopetitive mind-sets and a multilevel approach to coopetition.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Louise Canning and Stuart Hanmer‐Lloyd

Places adaptation within the context of firm behaviour in supplier‐customer relationships before going on to review previous adaptation studies. Gives the rationale and…

Abstract

Places adaptation within the context of firm behaviour in supplier‐customer relationships before going on to review previous adaptation studies. Gives the rationale and outline of the chosen case‐study based research strategy before findings are presented in which the nature of the adaptation process and progression of this process are considered. Concludes by discussing the significance of the findings in terms of understanding of the adaptation process and future research as well as implications for managing this process.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

Louise Canning and Stuart Hanmer‐Lloyd

The paper aims to describe and develop the constructs of trust and adaptation in supplier‐customer relationships when associated with environmental (green) issues.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to describe and develop the constructs of trust and adaptation in supplier‐customer relationships when associated with environmental (green) issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on empirical data obtained from the perspective of both supplier and customer companies involved in dyadic exchange relationships, using qualitative methods of data collection and analysis.

Findings

The paper uses an environmental context to show that, while having the potential to contribute to trust in dyadic relationships, adaptation can also undermine the trust that already exists between supplier and customer companies.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are derived from two instances of successful environmental adaptation, one that resulted in failure and two that were ongoing. Both of the completed projects demonstrated little apparent difficulty, while the ongoing projects featured some conflict and frustration. These differences could be explained by the tendency to rationalise events after they have occurred, eliminating the “messiness” that is inherent in dealing with collaborative efforts that involve some risk and conflicting interests. Future empirical work could perform action research in which efforts to adapt are directly observed and are discussed both during and after attempts to bring about change.

Practical implications

The paper provides recommendations of how environmental adaptations can be realised successfully even though changes might challenge the basis of an existing relationship and the trust that might already exist within it. These recommendations might equally be used to guide other forms of adaptation.

Originality/value

The paper broadens understanding of trust and adaptation by looking at a management issue that is of growing importance in supplier‐customer relationships, namely the environmental impact of business activities.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Louise Canning

The purpose of this article is to provide an application of network literature that can be used for teaching and learning purposes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide an application of network literature that can be used for teaching and learning purposes.

Design/methodology/approach

The information used to present the case study is drawn principally from documentary evidence as well as discussions with a phone manufacturer, retailer and waste management company.

Findings

Describes the role of key actors in the development of “circular” supply chains for mobile phones and outlines two recovery and reuse/recycling schemes, one which operated as a trial (having been initiated by mobile phone manufacturers) and one which has functioned as a commercially viable arrangement since 2002 and is led by waste management and retail firms. The two schemes demonstrate ways in which various parties seek to influence the behaviour of others as well as changes (both temporary and permanent) in the activities performed by and connections between parties.

Research limitations/implications

Whichever way various companies choose to deal with electronic waste, one factor remains constant, namely that collection schemes are of little value without consumer involvement. The case study would have benefited from empirical research of consumer awareness of and propensity to contribute to phone collection schemes.

Practical implications

A valuable illustration for teachers and students of “markets as networks” using a problem which is prevalent in any geographic location. The case could also be used as a vehicle for students to design and conduct research into consumer disposal of discarded phones and awareness of/propensity to make use of available recovery and reuse/recycling schemes.

Originality/value

Requires the reader to think beyond linear supply chains and shows how network literature can incorporate consumers and organisational actors alike. The UK perspective provides a useful teaching/learning tool by describing how discarded mobile phones are handled. In addition to this, the case study could be used as a starting point from which to investigate how networks are organised in other geographic locations for dealing with this same problem.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Isabelle Szmigin, Louise Canning and Alexander E. Reppel

To revisit relationship marketing in the context of the digital economy.

Abstract

Purpose

To revisit relationship marketing in the context of the digital economy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops a conceptual framework (the customer bonding triangle) that enables greater understanding of the contributions of service delivery and online communities in the development of bonds in interactive relationships. The function of the three key elements of the framework (namely service value, technical infrastructure and interactivity) in enabling bonding via internet communities, is developed.

Findings

Suggests that firms rethink the role and nature of the consumer and that in order to facilitate bonding firms must make use of systems that are tightly integrated yet can also incorporate flexibility to help develop better understanding amongst participants.

Originality/value

Provides a framework to help understand key elements in interactive relationships.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Sheena Leek and Louise Canning

This paper seeks to investigate the role of social capital in facilitating the entry of new business ventures into service networks.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate the role of social capital in facilitating the entry of new business ventures into service networks.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical work is undertaken via case study‐based research, featuring three service businesses, each entering and operating in a different marketplace.

Findings

Results show that new service businesses are not necessarily able to draw on existing social capital in order to enter a business network and build relationships with potential customers and suppliers.

Research limitations/implications

Future empirical work should re‐examine the distinctions between the role and nature of social capital for new service businesses.

Practical implications

The paper suggests how the new service entrepreneur might invest personal resources in networking to initiate relationships and build a network of customers and suppliers.

Originality/value

The paper presents the little researched area of networking and relationship initiation as a means of developing social capital for new service businesses.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

When Reproduction Meets Ageing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-747-8

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Louise Potts

Abstract

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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