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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2018

Louisa S. Ha and Chenjie Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of smartphones and computers as web survey entry response devices on the quality of responses in different question…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of smartphones and computers as web survey entry response devices on the quality of responses in different question formats and across different survey invitations delivery modes. The respondents’ preference of device and the response immediacy were also compared.

Design/methodology/approach

Two field experiments were conducted with a cluster sampling and a census of all students in a public university in the USA.

Findings

Device effect on response quality was only found when using computer-aided self-interviews, but not in e-mail delivered web surveys. Even though the computer was the preferred device, but the smartphone’s immediate response was significantly higher than the computer.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was restricted to college students who are more proficient users of smartphones and have high access to computers. But the direct comparison in the two studies using the same population increases the internal validity of the study comparing different web survey delivery modes.

Practical implications

Because of the minor differences in device on response quality, researchers can consider using more smartphones for field work such as computer-aided self-interviews to complement e-mail delivered surveys.

Originality/value

This is the first study that compares the response device effects of computer-aided self-interviews and e-mailed delivered web surveys. Because web surveys are increasingly used and various devices are being used to collect data, how respondents behave in different devices and the strengths and weaknesses of different methods of delivery survey help researchers to improve data quality and develop effective web survey delivery and participant recruitment.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 July 2020

Louisa Ha, Chenjie Zhang and Weiwei Jiang

Low response rates in web surveys and the use of different devices in entering web survey responses are the two main challenges to response quality of web surveys. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Low response rates in web surveys and the use of different devices in entering web survey responses are the two main challenges to response quality of web surveys. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of using interviewers to recruit participants in computer-assisted self-administered interviews (CASI) vs computer-assisted personal interviews (CAPI) and smartphones vs computers on participation rate and web survey response quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Two field experiments using two similar media use studies on US college students were conducted to compare response quality in different survey modes and response devices.

Findings

Response quality of computer entry was better than smartphone entry in both studies for open-ended and closed-ended question formats. Device effect was only significant on overall completion rate when interviewers were present.

Practical implications

Survey researchers are given guidance how to conduct online surveys using different devices and choice of question format to maximize survey response quality. The benefits and limitations of using an interviewer to recruit participants and smartphones as web survey response devices are discussed.

Social implications

It shows how computer-assisted self-interviews and smartphones can improve response quality and participation for underprivileged groups.

Originality/value

This is the first study to compare response quality in different question formats between CASI, e-mailed delivered online surveys and CAPI. It demonstrates the importance of human factor in creating sense of obligation to improve response quality.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Louisa Ha, Mohammad Hatim Abuljadail, Claire Youngnyo Joa and Kisun Kim

This study aims to examine the difference between personalized and non-personalized recommendations in influencing YouTube users’ video choices. In addition, whether men…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the difference between personalized and non-personalized recommendations in influencing YouTube users’ video choices. In addition, whether men and women have a significant difference in using recommendations was compared and the predictors of recommendation video use frequency were explored.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 524 Saudi Arabia college students was conducted using computer-assisted self-administered interviews to collect their video recommendation sources and how likely they follow the recommendation from different sources.

Findings

Video links posted on social media used by the digital natives were found as the most effective form of recommendation shows that social approval is important in influencing trials. Recommendations can succeed in both personalized and non-personalized ways. Personalized recommendations as in YouTube recommended videos are almost the same as friends and family’s non-personalized posting of video links on social media in convincing people to watch the videos. Contrary to expectations, Saudi men college students are more likely to use recommendations than women students.

Research limitations/implications

The use of a non-probability sample is a major limitation and self-reported frequency may result in over- or under-estimation of video use.

Practical implications

Marketers will realize that they may not need the personalized recommendation from the large site. They can use social media recommendations by the consumers’ friends and family. E-mail is the worst platform for a recommendation.

Social implications

Recommendation is a credible source and can overcome the avoidance of advertising. Its influence on consumers will be increasing in years to come with the algorithmic recommendation and social media use.

Originality/value

This is the first study to compare the influence of different online recommendation sources and compare personalized and non-personalized recommendations. As recommendation is growing more and more important with algorithm development online, the study results have high reference values to marketers in Islamic countries and beyond.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2019

Mohammad Hatim Abuljadail and Louisa Ha

This paper aims to investigate the “posting” behavior of marketers on brands’ Facebook pages and whether these “posting” behaviors differ between local and global brands…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the “posting” behavior of marketers on brands’ Facebook pages and whether these “posting” behaviors differ between local and global brands in Saudi Arabia.

Design/methodology/approach

The study randomly selected a total of 400 Facebook brand page posts from a matching sample of top 20 global and 20 local brands in Saudi Arabia using content analysis.

Findings

One of the notable findings show that global brands are more likely to post content that consists of prizes/giveaways, games/competitions and socializing than local brands, while local brands are more likely to post informative content than global brands. The findings also show that local brands are more likely to use content that includes Islamic messages, women in modest clothing, Arabic language and Saudi dialect than global brands.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to 20 global and 20 local brands. More product categories are needed.

Practical implications

The findings of this study have implications for marketers in regards to what types of communication content is more likely to be posted on brands’ Facebook fan pages in Saudi Arabia – especially for those global brands that are interested in having a localized brand Facebook fan page for Saudi Arabia.

Originality/value

The first study to compare Facebook strategies used by global brands and local brands in the same market.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Nicky Chang Bi, Yanqin Lu, Louisa Ha and Peiqin Chen

Social media have become an increasingly important source for people to learn about politics and public affairs. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of…

Abstract

Purpose

Social media have become an increasingly important source for people to learn about politics and public affairs. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of social media news sharing as a reasoning process of the O-S-R-O-R model and the moderation role of social media news performance on the association between news consumption and attitudinal changes.

Design/methodology/approach

A national survey was conducted in the US. The researcher recruited participants in the Qualtrics national panel by following the census adult demographic breakdown.

Findings

This study finds that social media news consumption on the US-China trade conflict is likely to lead Americans to change attitudes toward Chinese, and this relationship is mediated by social media news sharing. In addition, the indirect relationship via news sharing is found particularly strong among individuals who perceive social media news fair and balanced.

Originality/value

This study extends the literature by examining social media news engagement on the ongoing trade conflict between the US and China. It reveals that the impact of social media news consumption on people's attitudinal and behavioral changes depends on people's perceived news quality on these platforms. Theoretical contribution to the O-S-R-O-R model and practical implications to social media news are discussed in terms of the role that social media platforms play in attitude change.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/OIR-05-2020-0178

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2018

Louisa Ha, Claire Youngnyo Joa, Itay Gabay and Kisun Kim

The purpose of this paper is to examine how college students’ social media use affects their school e-mail avoidance and campus involvement.

3342

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how college students’ social media use affects their school e-mail avoidance and campus involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed face-to-face interviews and self-administered survey/quantitative data.

Findings

Communication and business students are more involved on campus and likely to use social media as the primary communication medium than other majors. Social media and text messages are not the culprits of school e-mail avoidance. University departments, student organizations, and faculty advisors’ e-mails are most likely to be avoided. Social media users can be categorized as either “instant communicators” or “online content curators.” Facebook is the only social media brand conducive to campus involvement.

Research limitations/implications

This study only used one university’s students as sample. In examining school e-mail avoidance, it only focused on the source of e-mail. The study is limited by its sole reliance on quantitative behavioral data.

Practical implications

University administrators and academic advisors need to reconsider the e-mail communication to students, target at the instant communicator social media users, and use Facebook to create a strong sense of community and campus involvement for their students. Marketers can utilize the two social media user groups in selecting social media in targeting to students.

Originality/value

The study offered empirical evidence to explain how social media affect students’ school e-mail avoidance and the role of campus media and specific social media outlet on campus involvement. It advances the knowledge of media choice of students and the social media user groups.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Louisa Ha

This study compares the use of enhanced TV features and TV commerce features on the Web sites of cable and broadcast TV networks. Both the quantitative analysis of the…

3217

Abstract

This study compares the use of enhanced TV features and TV commerce features on the Web sites of cable and broadcast TV networks. Both the quantitative analysis of the specific programs featured on the Web sites and the qualitative analysis of the overall Web sites show some differences in their strategies and site usability. Some program genres could develop TV commerce opportunities more easily than others. Different program genres emphases on the Web site were found between broadcast TV networks and cable TV networks. Three enhanced TV strategy models are proposed as a result of the analysis: welcome all model; fans‐friendly model; and hello model. The managerial implications of these models on TV revenue and viewership are discussed.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 November 2018

Nicky Chang Bi, Ruonan Zhang and Louisa Ha

As YouTubers began to create videos about their personal experience of using products, these video testimonials have become a powerful form of electronic word-of-mouth…

2013

Abstract

Purpose

As YouTubers began to create videos about their personal experience of using products, these video testimonials have become a powerful form of electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM). This study aims to investigate the mediating role of self-effect and third-person effect in the relationships between eWOM seeking and passing along YouTube product review videos (video-based eWOM – vWOM) as a specific form of eWOM.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used a survey to interview a total of 282 respondents at a public university in the Midwest USA with about 18,000 students.

Findings

The results show that perceived third-person effect leads to sharing more positive vWOM, while perceived self-effect results in a high likelihood of passing along negative vWOM. The general eWOM consumption does not have a direct effect on the sharing of vWOM. In addition, the YouTube sharing habit contributes to sharing vWOM regardless of valence.

Practical implications

The results provide marketers’ insights on how to utilize the social media such as YouTube to improve the visibility of promotional brand messages. Sharing of positive vWOM is due to perceived third-person effect (presumed influence), but sharing negative vWOM is due to perceived self-effect. It also suggests marketers take immediate remedial measures to avoid spreading of negative reviews to other users because if viewers are persuaded to think it could happen to themselves as well, they will spread the video.

Originality/value

The paper has theoretical implications. It contributes to the third-person effect and presumed influence literature by exploring its role in spreading the word for products. It also fills the gap in effects of eWOM literature by examining the mediating role of the valence of video-based eWOM in the spread of eWOM.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Kenneth Yip, Louisa Leung and Deacons Yeung

The purpose of this paper is to present simulation modelling to reconfigure a 700-bed Hong Kong hospital’s master surgery schedule (MSS), aiming to improve patient flow…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present simulation modelling to reconfigure a 700-bed Hong Kong hospital’s master surgery schedule (MSS), aiming to improve patient flow, capacity management and resource allocation through levelling bed occupancy within the hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

A discrete-event simulation model was developed to understand how changes to the MSS would affect bed occupancy, thereby providing business intelligence for short- and long-term hospital planning. A decision tool was subsequently developed for hospital managers to test different scenarios.

Findings

Simulation modelling showed that significant bed occupancy levelling could be achieved through small and practicable changes to the MSS. Optimisation routines conducted using the simulation model then gave additional insights into how the schedule should be revamped for the long term.

Practical implications

The authors show how operations research methods are useful for guiding hospital operational planning. The authors show that a data-driven and evidence-based model enables hospital managers to critically explore various scheduling changes, while also providing a scientific common ground for discussion among important stakeholders. It is a crucial step forward when adopting advanced analytics for Hong Kong hospital operational planning.

Originality/value

The authors provide a robust method for evaluating the relationship between Hong Kong hospital’s MSS and its bed occupancy. Through simulating various changes to the surgical schedule, valuable and practicable insights were made available for hospital managers to make short- and longer-term changes that enhance the system’s overall efficiency and service quality.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Louisa Ha

Both Hong Kong and the USA are capitalistic open markets with a highly developed service industry. This study examines the advertising appeals used by services marketers…

3699

Abstract

Both Hong Kong and the USA are capitalistic open markets with a highly developed service industry. This study examines the advertising appeals used by services marketers in these two markets and compares the advertising appeals used by experience services and credence services. In addition to a modified set of Resnik and Stern’s (1977) information cues, the association attributes and terminal values conveyed in services advertisements were examined. Although services advertising seems to show quite a number of market differences in the choice of information cues, association attributes, and terminal values, most of these differences diminish when the service type is controlled.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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