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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Louis Raymond, François Bergeron, Anne-Marie Croteau, Ana Ortiz de Guinea and Sylvestre Uwizeyemungu

As purveyors of knowledge-based and high value-added services to the manufacturing sector, industrial service small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) must develop the…

Abstract

Purpose

As purveyors of knowledge-based and high value-added services to the manufacturing sector, industrial service small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) must develop the information technology (IT) capabilities that, in combination with other non-IT capabilities, enable their capacity for organizational learning (OL) and for explorative learning in particular. In this context, this study aims to identify the different causal configurations that account for the nonlinear complex interplay of IT capabilities for exploration and strategic capabilities for explorative learning as they affect these firms’ competitive performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data obtained from 92 industrial service SMEs were analyzed with a configurational approach, using fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA).

Findings

As it allows for equifinality, the fsQCA analysis identified two sets of causal configurations that characterize the sampled firms’ explorative learning capability as it relates to competitive performance. In the first set, two configurations were equally associated with high innovation performance, whereas in the second set, four configurations were equally associated with high productivity.

Originality/value

By viewing explorative learning as a dynamic capability that is enabled by the firm’s IT and strategic capabilities, the study contributes to OL theory by providing a more concrete or “operational” grounding, which allows for a greater practical applicability of this theory. By taking both the configurational and capability-based views of the OL-IT-performance causal framework, the authors provide an empirical basis for unraveling, explaining and understanding the complex non-linear relationships embedded within this framework.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Louis Raymond

Founded on IT diffusion and assimilation theory, a survey study of 54 Canadian travel agencies has allowed us to identify various factors determining the assimilation of…

Abstract

Founded on IT diffusion and assimilation theory, a survey study of 54 Canadian travel agencies has allowed us to identify various factors determining the assimilation of electronic commerce by small enterprises in the form of informational, transactional, and strategic implementation of a Web site. The results indicate that informational implementation and transactional implementation are determined by the environmental context (business partners’ influence and environmental uncertainty), whereas strategic implementation is determined by the travel agencies’ marketing strategy (in terms of distribution and communication), the organizational context (type of ownership, nature of business), and the characteristics of electronic commerce (perceived advantages and technology attributes).

Details

Internet Research, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Marie Marchand and Louis Raymond

As calls have been made to characterize and theorise performance measurement systems (PMS) and as these systems are highly contextualised because of their mission-critical…

Abstract

Purpose

As calls have been made to characterize and theorise performance measurement systems (PMS) and as these systems are highly contextualised because of their mission-critical nature, the purpose of this paper is to generate empirically-valid and useful findings with regard to their characterisation as information technology artefacts through an approach founded upon the user’s perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Using both qualitative and quantitative data collection approaches, the authors conducted a field study through extensive interviews in situ with the owner-managers of 16 small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Findings

The PMS are characterised, from their users’ point of view, in terms of their functional attributes as information systems dedicated to the management of organisational performance, that is, as being either operational, functional, managerial or organisational systems.

Research limitations/implications

Having modelled the PMS artefact in terms of its artefactual dimensions and features, the authors have empirically validated a characterisation approach that allows researchers to circumscribe this artefact within its specific usage context and to identify its salient attributes as study variables.

Practical implications

The research findings provide an empirical basis for the design and evaluation of PMS that is coherent with the specific context of their use in SMEs.

Originality/value

This study validates a novel and demonstrably useful artefactual perspective to characterize and theorise PMS as objects of empirical research.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Marie Marchand and Louis Raymond

Considering performance measurement and management systems (PMMS) to be “mission-critical” information systems for many business organisations, calls have been made for…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering performance measurement and management systems (PMMS) to be “mission-critical” information systems for many business organisations, calls have been made for researchers to shift from studying the use of such systems to studying their “effective” use, and in so doing to focus on their characterisation as information technology (IT) artefacts. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

In seeking to answer these calls, the authors apply Burton-Jones and Grange’s theoretical framework to study the dimensions, contextual drivers and benefits of the effective use of PMMS. This is done through a field study of 16 PMMS artefacts as used in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Findings

In characterising, contextualising and valuing the effective use of PMMS, this study provides answers to the following questions: What constitutes the effective use of PMMS? What are the user, artefactual and task-related drivers of such use? And what are the benefits for SMEs of using performance measurement and management (PMM) systems effectively?

Practical implications

With regard to the design of a PMMS artefact, the findings imply that one should concentrate on those artefactual attributes that most enable informed action on the part of owner-managers, as it is these actions have the greater consequences for the realisation of IT business value in SMEs. Moreover, the nomological network resulting from this research provides the theoretical and methodological underpinnings of a diagnostic tool meant to develop the PMM function in SMEs.

Originality/value

This study provides further empirical grounding and understanding. This study provides further empirical grounding and understanding of the concept of effective use, as well as further applicability and actionability to this concept and to the nomological network of its dimensions, contextual drivers and benefits in the case of PMMS and in the context of SMEs.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

François L'Écuyer, Louis Raymond, Bruno Fabi and Sylvestre Uwizeyemungu

Within the manufacturing sector, small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) face specific challenges with regard to their strategic HRM capabilities. In this context, an…

Abstract

Purpose

Within the manufacturing sector, small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) face specific challenges with regard to their strategic HRM capabilities. In this context, an emerging issue for both researchers and practitioners regards HR information systems (HRIS), i.e. the deployment of strategic IT capabilities to enable the firm’s high-performance work system (HPWS) capabilities and thus improve the performance of its HR function. The purpose of this paper is to address this issue by using a capability-based mediation perspective to study the strategic alignment of HR and IT.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey study of 206 manufacturing SMEs was realized and the data thus obtained was analyzed through structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results confirm that the HRIS capabilities of SMEs influence the performance of the HR function through their strategic alignment with the HPWS capabilities of these enterprises.

Practical implications

The results suggest that the manufacturing SMEs most active in developing their HRIS capabilities while developing their HPWS capabilities are most likely to develop a competitive advantage through the improved performance of their HR function. This is especially important in a time when firms of all sizes across the globe are waging a “war for talent,” and are enabled to do so by their strategic use of IT.

Originality/value

The results of the study constitute a valid basis for prediction and prescription with regards to the strategic alignment of human and IT resources.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Brigitte Prud’homme and Louis Raymond

This study aims to describe and understand how and to what extent hotel managers adopt sustainable development (SD) practices in their establishment, given the presence of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to describe and understand how and to what extent hotel managers adopt sustainable development (SD) practices in their establishment, given the presence of barriers to the adoption of such practices by hotel establishments, and the lack of knowledge as to the ways and means by which an SD orientation is developed and implemented.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research strategy was chosen to answer the research questions, that is, a multi-site case study of five Canadian hotels.

Findings

The study shows why and how hotel managers proceeded to develop and implement an SD orientation, as well as the contextual factors that affected the extent to which SD practices were adopted.

Research limitations/implications

The initial elaboration and validation of a process model of SD adoption in hotel establishments constitute a conceptual building block upon which this complex phenomenon can be further studied.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates that in the hospitality industry, implementing an SD orientation is a strategy that can be enabled through the provision of required knowledge and expertise as well as appropriate tools and techniques to hotel managers.

Originality/value

In describing and understanding the dynamics of implementing a SD orientation in five Canadian hotels, this study has provided a conceptually and practically fruitful answer to the question of “how” and “to what extent” hotels adopt SD practices.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2017

François L’Écuyer and Louis Raymond

This study aims to explore the relationship between IT and HRM in the context of manufacturing SMEs, more specifically the relationship between strategic HRM and e-HRM as…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the relationship between IT and HRM in the context of manufacturing SMEs, more specifically the relationship between strategic HRM and e-HRM as well as the performance effects of this relationship. The conceptual framework is founded upon the resource-based view (RBV), specifically upon the strategic HRM and e-HRM capabilities of SMEs and upon the strategic alignment of these capabilities in the form of capability configurations or “gestalts.”

Methodology/approach

To answer the research questions, a questionnaire was constructed and mailed to 1854 manufacturing SMEs in the province of Quebec, Canada, producing 216 valid responses that were used for statistical analysis purposes. Capability configurations were identified through a cluster analysis of the e-HRM and strategic HRM capabilities developed by these firms.

Findings

Using structural equation modeling to validate the research model, a causal analysis confirmed a positive influence of the sampled SMEs’ strategic orientation upon their development of strategic HRM capabilities. More importantly, a higher level of alignment between the SMEs’ strategic HRM and e-HRM capabilities was associated to a higher level of strategic HRM performance.

Originality/value

To our knowledge, ours is the first study to show interest in the effect of the strategic alignment of HRM and IT capabilities upon HRM performance, by adopting a configurational perspective and considering organizational IT from a functional point of view. Given the specific context of SMEs, the focus was on e-HRM capabilities related to the IT infrastructure of these organizations and the IT competencies of individuals related to HRM.

Details

Electronic HRM in the Smart Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-315-9

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Placide Poba‐Nzaou, Louis Raymond and Bruno Fabi

In order to deepen the knowledge and further advance theory on enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementation in small‐ to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs), this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

In order to deepen the knowledge and further advance theory on enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementation in small‐ to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs), this paper seeks to explore the following question: what can be done to minimize the risk of ERP system implementation, from the adoption stage onwards, in a small manufacturing firm?

Design/methodology/approach

The research method is based on a positivist holistic single‐case design in order to perform an initial test of a process model of ERP system adoption by SMEs. The unit of analysis selected by purposeful sampling is a small manufacturing business.

Findings

In attempting to minimize the risk of ERP implementation, the small manufacturing firm applied three principles, eight policies and ten specific practices in adopting ERP.

Research limitations/implications

The research design, based upon a single‐case study, imposes care in generalizing the results of the study. This design, however, allowed the identification and understanding of the risk of ERP from a managerial/practical standpoint, as opposed to a research/theoretical standpoint.

Practical implications

In managerial terms, the results show that highly formalized management is not necessary to minimize ERP implementation risk in the context of SMEs.

Originality/value

Few studies have focused on the adoption process within the ERP implementation cycle. The proposed model, as validated empirically in this study, adds to the understanding of this process in small‐manufacturing firms, especially as regards the minimization of implementation risk from the adoption stage onwards.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Louis Raymond and Josée St‐Pierre

In order to deepen one's knowledge and further build theory on the implementation and use of advanced manufacturing systems (AMS) in small and medium‐sized enterprises…

Abstract

Purpose

In order to deepen one's knowledge and further build theory on the implementation and use of advanced manufacturing systems (AMS) in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs), the present research seeks to explore the following questions: What is the present level of AMS sophistication in SMEs? What characteristics of the SMEs' strategic, organizational and entrepreneurial context are associated with higher levels of AMS sophistication? And what are the operational and business performance impacts of this sophistication for small and medium‐sized manufacturers?

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 248 Canadian manufacturers was used to collect data that were analyzed by structured equation modeling.

Findings

AMS sophistication significantly impacts both the operational performance and the business performance of SMEs. Antecedents of this sophistication include the education and experience of the owner‐manager, the strategic orientation of the firm, the type of production, and the commercial dependency of small manufacturers.

Research limitations/implications

The nature of the sample and perceptual nature of certain measures impose care in generalizing the results of the study. Future research should examine environmental factors (e.g. environmental uncertainty) and structural factors (e.g. structural complexity) in particular for added explanatory power of AMS sophistication.

Practical implications

Small business managers, wanting to increase their firm's manufacturing flexibility, reduce costs, improve quality, and eventually increase profitability, should look at the present level of AMS sophistication in conjunction with their strategic intent.

Originality/value

Given the dearth of empirical knowledge in this regard, the present study has contributed to a better understanding of the nature and state of AMS sophistication in small manufacturing firms, and of the antecedents and outcomes of this sophistication.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Louis Raymond, Sylvestre Uwizeyemungu, François Bergeron and Stéphane Gauvin

This study aims to propose an integrative conceptual framework of e‐learning adoption and assimilation that is adapted to the specific context of small to medium‐sized…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose an integrative conceptual framework of e‐learning adoption and assimilation that is adapted to the specific context of small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

The literature on the state of e‐learning usage in SMEs and on the IT adoption and assimilation factors that can be specifically applied to e‐learning adoption and assimilation in this context are reviewed. These factors are then integrated within a research framework, and a set of 20 propositions formulated.

Findings

The paper identifies the technological, organizational and environmental factors that are likely to favor or hinder e‐learning adoption and assimilation in SMEs, as well as the interaction among these factors.

Research limitations/implications

The integrative framework and the 20 propositions that emanate from it constitute the conceptual foundation for a research program and hypotheses on the adoption and assimilation of e‐learning in SMEs.

Practical implications

This study offers managers a frame of reference to analyze their firm's situation before initiating an e‐learning program by highlighting key adoption and assimilation factors in the specific context of SMEs.

Originality/value

This study proposes an integrative conceptual framework of e‐learning adoption and assimilation that is adapted to the specific context of SMEs.

1 – 10 of 452