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Article
Publication date: 30 December 2020

Louis J. Pantuosco and Danko Tarabar

This paper aims to hypothesize on the relationship between the Millennial workforce and US firms’ response to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) of 2017. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to hypothesize on the relationship between the Millennial workforce and US firms’ response to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) of 2017. The authors postulate that societal pressure from the younger generational cohorts will motivate socially cognizant corporations to share their newly acquired tax benefits with their workforce to attract, retain and inspire employee productivity and retention, as well as customer loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors empirically examine work-related cultural attitudes of the Millennial generational cohort in the USA, and by exploring related literature on organizational management and supply side economics, the authors aim to connect them to firms’ response to tax cut windfall in a simple theoretical model. The authors complement their methods by using descriptive statistics on firm tax responses that followed the 2017 TCJA.

Findings

The authors offer support for the notion that companies are behaving rationally by providing short-term benefits to employees when employees are, on average, younger. The competitive nature of the global market acts as an incentive to avoid permanent obligations such as wage and benefits increases. The data reveal that a significant number of companies had a transitory reaction to the latest tax cut.

Research limitations/implications

The authors encourage future research, once sufficient time elapses, to exploit the time periods before and after the tax cut to provide a better assessment of the empirical impact of the 2017 tax cut on firm responses, conditional on workforce makeup.

Originality/value

The authors examine whether and how the Millennial cohort might shape firm behavior following changes in tax policy.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2009

Philip Law and Jennifer Hung

Entrepreneurship plays a key role in society and is important for economic growth. Despite prior studies of entrepreneurial behavior, no research has been conducted to…

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Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurship plays a key role in society and is important for economic growth. Despite prior studies of entrepreneurial behavior, no research has been conducted to examine the influence of monetary and personality factors on the entrepreneurial start up of Certified Public Accountant (CPA) firms in Hong Kong. The purpose of this paper is to investigate into factors influencing Hong Kong CPAs in becoming entrepreneurial public practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected through a questionnaire survey and analyzed by binomial logistic regression. A total of 212 CPAs of Chinese origin are randomly selected in Hong Kong. Social capital theory derived from the sociology literature is employed for analysing the findings.

Findings

Results indicate that “profit motivation” and “education level” variables have no significant influence on the entrepreneurial start up, and contradict findings in prior literature. Results further reveal that “social networking” and “internal locus of control” variables could positively influence on the entrepreneurial start up of CPA practices. Results support the validity of social capital theory that reveals social networks have values and productive benefits. Gender plays a role in the entrepreneurial start up of CPA practices, with males predominate has entrepreneurs of CPA practices.

Originality/value

This study could add new contributions to the accounting literature on the study of the entrepreneurial start up of CPA practices in Hong Kong. With the booming Hong Kong economy and the vast supports from China's prosperous market, Hong Kong CPAs are more inclined to become entrepreneurs of CPA practices in the long run. Implications of this study could enable accounting bodies and education institutions focusing on CPAs' personality development and education.

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Chris Doucouliagos and Patrice Laroche

The impact of unions on productivity growth has received extensive attention from researchers in industrial relations and economics. Despite a voluminous literature…

Abstract

The impact of unions on productivity growth has received extensive attention from researchers in industrial relations and economics. Despite a voluminous literature, controversy continues regarding the effect of unions on productivity growth. In this paper, meta-analysis and meta-regression analysis is used to quantify the association between unions and productivity growth and to accomplish a quantitative assessment of the empirical literature. The results indicate that the overall association between unions and productivity growth is negative, especially for the U.S. The search for moderator variables revealed that most of the variation in the published results is artificial and can be attributed to specification differences.

Details

Advances in the Economic Analysis of Participatory & Labor-Managed Firms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-000-5

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