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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2019

Farhad Uddin Ahmed and Louis Brennan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the differential effects of national export promotion policies (EPPs) on firms’ early internationalization using the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the differential effects of national export promotion policies (EPPs) on firms’ early internationalization using the institution-based view (IBV) as our theoretical foundation. Early or speedy internationalization is an important topic for academics, executives and policy makers. However, the effect of the regulatory dimension of institutions incorporating governmental policies on firms’ early internationalization remains unexplored in the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was survey-based and the authors engaged in quantitative analysis using data drawn from the apparel industry in a least-developed country (LDC), i.e. Bangladesh. The authors employed 174 valid questionnaires in the analysis. To test the proposed hypotheses, an ordered-logistic regression modeling technique was used.

Findings

The findings reveal a positive effect of those national policies focusing on market development, guarantee-related and technical support schemes. Two individual elements of direct finance-related assistance, namely, bank loans and cash subsidy are also found to be influential.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the literature and extends the IBV by establishing that the industry-specific regulatory policies designed by home country governments can play a critical role in international expansion of new ventures from an LDC. In particular, the study established the critical role of national EPPs in driving firms’ early internationalization and thereby, contributing to the international marketing and international entrepreneurship (IE) literature. Least-developed countries provide different institutional environments for entrepreneurship. They thus provide an atypical context within the field of IE. By incorporating sample firms from an LDC, the authors address the knowledge gap related to those countries. The implications of the authors’ findings for national and enterprise development policies are also considered.

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

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2065

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Ruth Rios‐Morales and Louis Brennan

Purpose – Emerging countries are surging as important contributors of outward foreign direct investment (FDI) in both developing and developed markets around the world…

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2106

Abstract

Purpose – Emerging countries are surging as important contributors of outward foreign direct investment (FDI) in both developing and developed markets around the world. This paper seeks to focus on Chinese investment in Europe with a particular consideration given to the manufacturing sector. The purpose of this paper is to analyse this new phenomenon in the context of the Eclectic Paradigm. Design/methodology/approach – This is a conceptual paper focusing on secondary research. The analysis incorporates aspects related to drivers and motivators, elements of difference, and includes considerations of the institutional role in influencing the competitiveness of firms and the strategies of countries. Findings – From this analysis emerges a contribution to theory development. A holistic model which incorporates government's role in influencing FDI is developed to advance understanding of Chinese OFDI in Europe. Practical implications – The model incorporating governmental influences on FDI presented in the paper can assist policy makers, managers and researchers in understanding the phenomenon. The analysis in the paper of the strengths and weaknesses of the new entrants and the threats and opportunities for incumbents provides insights for managers of the new entrants and incumbents alike. Originality/value – Data and scholarly research on the topic of FDI from emerging countries and on the emergence of China as a potential investor in Europe are limited. Since emerging markets are playing a growing role as sources of FDI, the study has sought to contribute particularly to the understanding of Chinese outward FDI in Europe.

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EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2009

Alessandra Vecchi and Louis Brennan

The aim of this paper is to present the results of a survey administered across 23 countries that examines quality priorities, practices and performance by adopting…

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9771

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present the results of a survey administered across 23 countries that examines quality priorities, practices and performance by adopting Hofstede's national cultural framework. The purpose of this study is to test the validity of the “culture‐specific” argument as an explanatory construct for explaining quality management.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in 2006 as part of the IV iteration of the International Manufacturing Strategy Survey. The methodology involved the use of a self‐administered questionnaire to director/head of operations/manufacturing in best practice firms within the sector of firms classified by ISIC codes (rev.3.1) Divisions 28‐35.

Findings

From the findings it emerges that whereas differences in priorities can be affected by masculinity and uncertainty avoidance to a very small degree, all the four dimensions of culture significantly affect quality practice and three of the four dimensions affect performance to a greater extent.

Practical implications

The paper contributes to the validation of the “culture‐specific” hypothesis in relation to quality management by addressing its managerial implications. In particular it calls for a fuller appreciation of cultural dimensions which will in turn help firms to better align their quality practices towards the attainment of improved quality performance.

Originality/value

Whereas the traditional literature on quality practices in its attempt to explain existing differences across countries addresses the issue of convergence or divergence of quality practices across countries, this paper analyses similarities and differences by comparing quality priorities, practices and performance across Hofstede's four cultural dimensions. The paper also proposes an original interpretative framework where variations in both quality practices and performance can be explained by some identifiable mechanisms either of “better fit” or “compensation”.

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Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Details

Symposium on Health Care Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-663-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Gina Vega and Louis Brennan

Management control over production has often meant control over one means of production: people. There is evidence of the use of social isolation to control human behavior…

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4720

Abstract

Management control over production has often meant control over one means of production: people. There is evidence of the use of social isolation to control human behavior throughout recorded history. Traces the development of social isolation through the multiple lenses of management, economics, psychology, sociology, engineering technology, social psychology, and communication science and presents a taxonomy of perspectives for discussion. The taxonomy is further elucidated through the assignment and distribution of 13 organizational factors for both the objective state and subjective feelings of social isolation as linked to advances in telecommuting and other off‐site “open collar” work.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2011

Ruth Rios‐Morales, Mohamed Ramady and Louis Brennan

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role of sovereign wealth funds (SWFs) in sustaining global economies. The subject of SWFs has increasingly garnered the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role of sovereign wealth funds (SWFs) in sustaining global economies. The subject of SWFs has increasingly garnered the concerns of policymakers, market players and scholars for two main reasons: First, these funds represent the largest concentration of capital that the world has ever known, with the Arabian Gulf SWFs becoming increasingly important global players, especially during the most recent financial crises. Second, there is the dominant role of national governments in the management of these colossal funds. This paper assesses the contrasting perspectives on SWFs and analyzes the role they can play in sustaining the global economy by engaging in foreign direct investment.

Design/methodology/approach

Both descriptive analysis and comparative analysis are used.

Findings

SWFs are large and tend to be long‐term investors and have characteristics that are compatible with foreign direct investment (FDI). There is a role for them in sustaining the global economy via FDI. This analysis suggests that only 11 percent of SWFs' investment in FDI is needed in order to counteract the forecast decline of FDI. Initiatives such as the recently established Santiago principles can help to allay the concerns of host and investor nations. This paper concludes that SWFs should be welcomed by market players and policy makers as tools of economic growth.

Practical implications

Current trends indicate that SWFs are playing an important role as a source of foreign investment, and are also reducing the impact of liquidity pressures in the international banking system. The main driving force of their investing in the global market is in securing higher returns. However, there has been unease among Western countries that have concerns that governments could use SWFs to seize control of strategic companies in sensitive sectors, for their own purposes.

Originality/value

The paper assesses the potential contribution of SWFs to FDI and highlights aspects related to fostering a code of conduct that can allay concerns around areas such as transparency, and the extent to which restrictions should be imposed by host governments.

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Paul Lyons and Louis Brennan

The purpose of this paper was to consider 52 conceptual frameworks identified during a systematic literature review with the aim of providing insights into various aspects…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to consider 52 conceptual frameworks identified during a systematic literature review with the aim of providing insights into various aspects of outsourcing relationships. Many authors propose these frameworks to contribute to our understanding of how outsourcing relationships are conceived, operate and evolve. A meta-analysis of these frameworks was completed.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach consisted of five stages: a systematic, but focused literature review to identify relevant frameworks; a study of the selected frameworks to enable the design of a typology of framework styles, so that frameworks adopting similar styles can be compared and analysed; grouping of the frameworks into families addressing different aspects of relationships as they form, operate and evolve; using the types (from the typology) within these family groups to facilitate a meta-analysis of each group by identifying common or contrasting themes; and deriving overall observations and identifying the most robust frameworks in each group.

Findings

Nine framework types are identified and named as nominal categorisation, matrix, pyramid, dependency, interaction, flowchart, two-dimensional progression, life cycle and stepped. Five logical family groups were identified addressing how relationships form, operate and evolve. These groups cover the scope of outsourcing relationship, the relationship governance, the climate of the relationship, relationship tactics and relationship evolution. Common themes were identified, and overall observations were drawn. Recommendations are also provided on the frameworks which were assessed as being most robust and likely to be of most use to practitioners and researchers.

Research limitations/implications

The study considered a representative sample of frameworks identified during a systematic review of literature relating to outsourcing relationships. However, it cannot be considered fully comprehensive, and frameworks from other sources also exist.

Practical implications

Outsourcing success depends on the establishment and management of a constructive relationship between the client and supplier. Frameworks assist understanding of this important aspect of outsourcing.

Originality/value

This paper provides a reference point for scholars and practitioners who are interested in outsourcing relationships and may value the sources identified and the summaries, comparisons and recommendations provided.

Details

Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8297

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Paul Coughlan, David Coghlan, Fiona Lombard, Louis Brennan, Timothy McNichols and Roger Nolan

The recent slowdown in the global economy has been a trigger for discontinuous change, prompting many organisations to re‐examine their collaborative strategies. This…

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Abstract

The recent slowdown in the global economy has been a trigger for discontinuous change, prompting many organisations to re‐examine their collaborative strategies. This paper, focuses on the management of collaborative relationships in a period of discontinuity, presents, compares and contrasts three case studies, each of distinctly separate systems integrators from within the high technology sector in Ireland. The case data presented were gathered in 2001 as part of CO‐IMPROVE – an EU‐funded action research project focused on collaborative improvement within the extended manufacturing enterprise. This paper presents a cross case analysis that examines different choices faced by these systems integrators in their management of collaborative relationships with their supply bases.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 23 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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