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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Brian R. Fry and Lotte L. Thomas

Examines the extent and nature of Mary Parker Follett’s contribution to the literature of public administration and related fields. First reviews the substantive…

Abstract

Examines the extent and nature of Mary Parker Follett’s contribution to the literature of public administration and related fields. First reviews the substantive contribution, and then employs a citation analysis to explore the frequency of references to Follett’s works and the areas in which they have had the greatest impact. The analysis suggests some relative neglect of Follett’s writings compared with other major authors in the field, but some recent resurgence of interest prompted largely by her focus on conflict resolution.

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Journal of Management History, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Kristoffer Brix Olesen, Mette Krogh Christensen and Lotte Dyhrberg O'Neill

Due to rapid changes in the future labor market, transferable skills are recognized as a vital learning outcome for students in undergraduate higher education. However…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to rapid changes in the future labor market, transferable skills are recognized as a vital learning outcome for students in undergraduate higher education. However, ambiguities surrounding the concept and content of transferable skills hamper the actual teaching and learning of transferable skills. Consequently, there is a great need for an overview of the literature on transferable skills to qualify and develop the approaches to transferrable skills in higher education. This study aims to outline a typology of how transferable skills are conceptualized in health sciences education, that is, medicine, nursing and related health professionals’ education.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was a mixed studies literature review, which included quantitative, qualitative and mixed-methods studies. A seven-stage sequential exploratory synthesis of the included studies was conducted.

Findings

This review showed that transferable skills reflected three main conceptualizations: Program Requirements, Employability and Holistic Development. Overall, the global methodological quality of the empirical studies of interventions to further transferable skills development in health science education was weak.

Research limitations/implications

This study aids clear conceptualization in future empirical studies.

Practical implications

By distinguishing between three main conceptualizations of transferable skills, this study's typology supports alignment in transferable skills curricula because conceptually sound learning objectives provide teachers and students in health sciences education with a clear purpose and direct educators' choice of relevant teaching and assessment strategies.

Originality/value

This review – the first of its kind – contributes to conceptualization of transferable skills as the basis for curriculum development and research.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Ted Buswick and Harvey Seifter

Abstract

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Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1903

AT last Mr. Baker's long announced “Descriptive Guide to the Best Fiction” is in our hands, and proves to be a bulky volume of over 600 pages, which must have cost its…

Abstract

AT last Mr. Baker's long announced “Descriptive Guide to the Best Fiction” is in our hands, and proves to be a bulky volume of over 600 pages, which must have cost its author many hours of arduous labour. Descriptive guides to literature of any sort are unfortunately too rare on this side of the world not to ensure for any decent attempt to compare with what the Americans are doing in this direction, the support of all librarians and bibliographers—at least we hope so—and Mr. Baker's book is a great advance on anything that has hitherto been attempted, here or elsewhere, to provide an annotated handbook to fiction. When the series of guides to literature, science, the arts, &c., announced by Messrs. Scott, Greenwood & Co., are published—which it is to be hoped will be soon—England will not be so desperately and humiliatingly “out of it,” as is the case at present, in the great task of selecting from and annotating the literature of the world.

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New Library World, vol. 5 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2003

Dong‐Mo Koo

This study examines how various characteristics of the discount retail environment and the overall attitude towards a discount retail store, considered to be an abstract…

Abstract

This study examines how various characteristics of the discount retail environment and the overall attitude towards a discount retail store, considered to be an abstract and global image component, influence consumers’ satisfaction and how consumers’ satisfaction, in turn, affects store loyalty. The data, collected from a sample of 517 discount retail customers in Daegu, Korea, indicate that: (1) forming the overall attitude is more closely related to in‐store services: atmosphere, employee service, after sales service and merchandising, (2) store satisfaction is formed through perceived store atmosphere and value, (3) the overall attitude has strong influence on satisfaction and loyalty and its impact is much stronger on loyalty than on satisfaction, (4) store loyalty is directly affected by most significantly location, merchandising and after sale service in order, (5) satisfaction is not related to customers’ committed store revisiting behavior. The applications in management and implications for future research are discussed.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Lotte Holck and Minna Paunova

Scholars often suggest that institutionalized employee voice reduces turnover as an alternative to exit when employees are dissatisfied. Paradoxically, Denmark presents a…

Abstract

Scholars often suggest that institutionalized employee voice reduces turnover as an alternative to exit when employees are dissatisfied. Paradoxically, Denmark presents a case of high union density and thus high institutionalized employee voice, yet high turnover rates. To explore the Danish turnover paradox, this chapter looks at the macro-societal contextual factors impacting turnover rates in the Danish labor market. Institutional characteristics such as the flexicurity model (i.e., a welfare state model with proactive labor market policy; a portmanteau of flexibility and security), legal frameworks (i.e., relatively lax labor market regulations), and cultural factors (i.e., a culture of equality and collective collaborative structures) are all relevant to understand the high turnover rates in Denmark. The authors first overview the general trends and figures on turnover in Denmark and then examine the Danish institutional, legal, and cultural factors as they relate to the high turnover rates in the Danish labor market. Finally, the authors summarize and discuss the findings and consider their implications for research and practice related to employee turnover in the Nordics and beyond.

Details

Global Talent Retention: Understanding Employee Turnover Around the World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-293-0

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Anne-Sophie Thelisson, Audrey Missonier, Gilles Guieu and Lotte S. Luscher

This paper aims to examine post-merger integration (PMI) through the lens of paradox to determine how paradoxes contribute to successful integration. Although PMI has been…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine post-merger integration (PMI) through the lens of paradox to determine how paradoxes contribute to successful integration. Although PMI has been identified as crucial to understand merger success or failure, the literature on PMI drivers remains inconclusive.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the theory of paradox and two key elements of PMI, strategic interdependency (SI) and organizational autonomy (OA), the authors describe the merger of two listed French companies using longitudinal data.

Findings

The authors identify how the paradox between OA and SI was triggered and fostered PMI success by leading to symbiotic integration. They also show that two capabilities were central in helping the paradox to evolve: preserving the specificities of the organizations and pooling their respective capabilities. These capabilities result from basic decisions and actions during the integration implementation, such as highlighting the expertise of the target firm, refocusing the core activity while valorizing each company’s expertise, clarifying the identity of the new organization on the market and enhancing joint piloting and transferring both general management capacity and functional abilities during the reorganization period.

Practical implications

The authors offer several useful insights for managers trying to manage paradoxical tension throughout the merger process. This study encourages managers to embrace inconsistencies as they make decisions and to shift to dynamic decision-making as a way to adapt to complex contexts.

Originality/value

This study adopts a global and inclusive approach to focus on OA and SI and flesh out a picture of the integration process. It proposes a dynamic process model to conceptualize the stage-wise nature of the PMI process by highlighting the interrelations between OA and SI dynamics.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Lotte Holck, Sara Louise Muhr and Florence Villesèche

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the identity and diversity literatures and discuss how a better understanding of the theoretical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the identity and diversity literatures and discuss how a better understanding of the theoretical connections between the two informs both diversity research and diversity management practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review followed by a discussion of the theoretical and practical consequences of connecting the identity and diversity literatures.

Findings

The authors inform future research in three ways. First, by showing how definitions of identity influence diversity theorizing in specific ways. Second, the authors explore how such definitions entail distinct foci regarding how diversity should be analyzed and interventions actioned. Third, the authors discuss how theoretical coherence between definitions of identity and diversity perspectives – as well as knowledge about a perspective’s advantages and limitations – is crucial for successful diversity management research and practice.

Research limitations/implications

The authors argue for a better understanding of differences, overlaps and limits of different identity perspectives, and for a stronger engagement with practice.

Practical implications

The work can encourage policy makers, diversity and HR managers to question their own practices and assumptions leading to more theoretical informed diversity management practices.

Originality/value

The theoretical connections between identity and diversity literature have so far not been reviewed systematically. The work foregrounds how important it is for diversity scholars to consider identity underpinnings of diversity research to help further develop the field within and beyond the three streams the authors discuss.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1952

Those local authorities in this country who have been carrying out extensive training courses for food handlers must, at this time of the year with annual estimates fresh…

Abstract

Those local authorities in this country who have been carrying out extensive training courses for food handlers must, at this time of the year with annual estimates fresh in their minds, together with frequent exhortations for economy, give much thought to the ultimate results of their efforts. In order to proceed further with this analysis, it is necessary to divide the authorities into three main groups: (1) those that have had a comprehensive system embracing lectures to all types of food handlers in hotels, food shops, fishmongers, bakers and greengrocers, etc.; (2) those who are content with one or two public lectures, or those whose campaigns take the form of a Clean Food Week; and finally (3) those who have no organised training programme, do not intend to have one and rely entirely on visits by Health Officers to advise and enforce the necessary Acts and local bye‐laws. It is imperative that a system of regular and thorough inspection of these premises be carried out at least once every three months, irrespective of what type of auxiliary training and lectures are put into force. Those officers who have spent a great deal of time in taking these courses and lecturing have found that there are many people who will not ask questions in front of an audience and to these advice during inspection is of the utmost importance. Particular difficulties in relation to equipment and layout can often be solved on the premises which would not be possible at a lecture even if the food handler would put his questions forward at that time. In order to check improvements, division into the three groups above will assist in assessing the achievements in any training programme. The consensus of opinion among health authorities in this country shows that comprehensive training programmes do pay good dividends. Later inspections show that there are improved conditions in food shops and improved working relations between the food industry and the local health department and, most important of all, increased public interest in, and support for, the cleaner food ideal. This assessment has also been borne out by the experience of authorities in the United States of America. In one large city in Columbia, 70 per cent of the staff of the licensed restaurants had completed training courses and one was interested to learn that in the “ A” restaurants the Health Department had issued tabs to be attached to menus which read: “ Our dishes and utensils are sanitised; our employees are trained; our kitchen invites your inspection”. Of particular interest in this respect is the attention paid to catering at fairs, a very thorny problem in this country. The Missouri Division of Health have stated that, during the past four years, there has not been a single reported case of food poisoning and that this has been accomplished, not only by means of regulations, but with constant supervision and a mobile laboratory that follows the fairs. It also stresses the value of dispensable paper cups and dishes that obviate the necessity for washing and sterilising facilities, often most difficult to obtain with mobile fairs and peripatetic catering. In one county in Kansas courses are planned by the Public Health Department and the Adult Education Sections of the Schools. All food handlers are required to have a card saying that they have successfully completed the course and this card is valid for one year only and personnel must complete a refresher course before obtaining a new card. The rates of improvement vary considerably but in all authorities in the United States of America, where comprehensive programmes have been carried out over a few years, definite improvement has been found in food handling. This is not the only aspect that must be considered at the present time. The potentiality of highly trained staff is of the utmost value in case of emergency. This was demonstrated in the very serious flooding that occurred in Kansas inundating hundreds of houses and disorganising public services. This problem arose at very short notice and the fact stressed by the State Board of Health was that, although the crisis lasted from a period of weeks to several months, not a single case of disease was traced to water supplies or to food. These emergency measures are undoubtedly the most stringent test of public health organisation and of the efficiency of those who handle and distribute food. In such cases, there is never sufficient time to start any scheme of training, but, with skilled staff, the spate of illnesses, such as typhoid, dysentery, etc., that invariably accompanied such occurrences could be reduced, if not eliminated, where efficient schemes of training have been carried out. When assessing the value of food training courses in such an emergency, one is forced by present conditions to think again of how it will fit in with Civil Defence requirements. The experience of the last war showed that the task of feeding large numbers of evacuees is a tremendous problem. It is not sufficient merely to have stores of food at strategic points, but trained people must be available who can not only make the most use of the food, but will know how to reduce the incidence of food poisoning or transference of infection when dealing with communal feeding of this type. To the foregoing must be added the risk that power and fuel might be cut off and also other main services. Then washing and sterilisation of equipment would not be possible. Experienced workers in this sphere will, prior to such conditions, have plans in hand that will cover all these contingencies. It may be necessary to feed homeless exacuees, Civil Defence workers operating in devastated areas, and even distribute food for the remaining citizens in towns where normal services have ceased to exist. It is in these circumstances that the food handler who has had thorough training will be able to carry on, well knowing the risks and taking every precaution to avoid the spread of infection and consequent epidemics.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 54 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1967

EVEN when it rains, and it did rain, Edinburgh has many attractions. It is a fine centre for a conference with some splendid libraries to visit and this year, as in other…

Abstract

EVEN when it rains, and it did rain, Edinburgh has many attractions. It is a fine centre for a conference with some splendid libraries to visit and this year, as in other years, our hosts put themselves out to make us welcome.

Details

New Library World, vol. 69 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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