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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Dania Mouakhar-Klouz, Alain d’Astous and Denis Darpy

The aim of the research presented in this paper is to enhance our understanding of self-gift giving behavior. Self-regulatory theory is used as a conceptual support to…

1657

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the research presented in this paper is to enhance our understanding of self-gift giving behavior. Self-regulatory theory is used as a conceptual support to achieve this objective. The main idea that is explored is that consumers’ self-gift purchase intentions vary across contexts and situations to the extent that these are compatible or not with their self-regulatory mindset, whether it is chronic or situational.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies, using a scenario-based experiment, were conducted to investigate the effects that regulatory focus has on consumers’ intentions to buy themselves a gift.

Findings

The results support the proposition that the chronic form of regulatory focus in success and failure situations has a significant impact on the intention to purchase a gift to oneself and show that the situational form of regulatory focus has an influence on self-gift purchase intention as well. They also confirm that situations that are congruent with consumers’ self-regulatory mindset lead to stronger self-gift purchase intentions.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this research lies in delineating the role that some specific dispositional and situational factors play in shaping consumers’ perceptions of success and failure events and how this impacts the eventual purchase of a gift to oneself. This contrasts with previous research on self-gift giving, where success and failure situations are assumed to be perceived similarly by consumers. Marketing managers wishing to stimulate consumers’ propensity to buy themselves gifts should consider using regulatory focus as a segmentation basis. Marketing communications should be adapted to consumers’ self-regulatory mindset.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Stephanie Dellande and Prashanth Nyer

The purpose of this study is to shed greater light on the factors that influence consumer compliance behavior, e.g. SRF, in compliance dependent services (CDS). CDS, e.g…

1083

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to shed greater light on the factors that influence consumer compliance behavior, e.g. SRF, in compliance dependent services (CDS). CDS, e.g. weight loss, retirement savings, education, credit repair, are long term in nature, often requiring lifestyle changes. In addition, and importantly, the customer's role in CDS extends beyond the face‐to‐face interaction and requires the consumer to comply with prescribed behaviors when away from the service provider.

Design/methodology/approach

The subjects were 243 female clients (aged 20 to 45) at a weight loss/fitness center located in south India. Subjects were selected from among the new clients who signed up for an eight‐week long weight loss and fitness program which seeks to help clients lose modest amounts of excess weight (averaging approximately ten pounds). On signing up, respondents completed a survey that included several scales of regulatory focus, and a question eliciting reasons for wanting to lose weight.

Findings

This study exams the role of self‐regulatory focus (SRF) in long‐term customer compliance behavior in weight loss. A specific measure of SRF led to better outcomes than the generalized measures of SRF.

Originality/value

Though this research project examines consumer behavior in the context of weight loss activities, it has far‐ranging implications for various services requiring consumers to engage in prescribed behaviors over the long run. For example, the success of debt counseling services and retirement savings programs require clients to engage in certain behaviors over the long run. Marketers of CDS programs will be able to use the findings of this research project to find new ways to increase long‐term customer compliance behavior.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 October 2021

Burcu Kör, Adriana Krawczyk and Ingrid Wakkee

Food waste is one of the most challenging issues humanity is currently facing. Therefore, there has been a growing interest in the prevention of food waste because of…

Abstract

Purpose

Food waste is one of the most challenging issues humanity is currently facing. Therefore, there has been a growing interest in the prevention of food waste because of world hunger, environmental impacts, resource scarcity and economic costs. The purpose of the study is to investigate the factors that influence food waste and the role of technology in tackling food waste in India and the Netherlands.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to explore differences in food loss and waste further this study will examine a number of practices on both the production and the consumer side, in a developing country and a developed country with different culture/economic backgrounds: India and the Netherlands. The factors that influence food waste were examined with a preliminary qualitative study, which consists of semi-structured interviews, and quantitative research that comprises a survey. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in both India and the Netherlands, which consists of five interviews. The survey data was collected from 78 individuals from India and 115 individuals from the Netherlands.

Findings

One of the main findings of the research is food waste is divided into waste within agricultural production (i.e. food loss) and final household consumption (i.e. food waste). Different factors influence food loss in different stages in the supply chain. Some of these factors include wastage during processing, storage, transportation and at the market-place. New technologies can utilize food loss for new purposes, so food loss is reduced to the minimum. Food waste is mainly influenced by food passing expiry date, food that is left too long in the fridge and consumers buying too much food. In final household consumption, technologies such as digital platforms enable individuals or organizations to share and donate their food, thereby creating awareness on food waste prevention and the environmental and ethical benefits.

Originality/value

The authors examine to what extent and in which ways supporting consumers to minimize food waste can be achieved via three stages: (1) understanding and evaluating food loss and waste, (2) identifying the factors that influence food loss and waste, (3) understanding consumer behaviors to encourage food waste reduction and (4) identifying the technological impact that would reduce food waste. As such, this paper contributes to ongoing debates about food waste by looking at the role of context and culture and by exploring differences between developed and developing countries. Also, the authors advance the debate by exploring both the role of advanced technology such as blockchain and drones in both preventing loss and waste as well as non-technological mechanisms.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2019

Hong-Jing Cui, Kim-Shyan Fam and Tai-Yang Zhao

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of regulatory focus on Chinese consumers’ intention to consume ethnic food, the mediating role of food neophobia and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of regulatory focus on Chinese consumers’ intention to consume ethnic food, the mediating role of food neophobia and the moderating role of message framing with regard to regulatory focus and ethnic food consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Lab experiments method was used in this paper, two studies were designed to test the relationship between regulatory focus, food neophobia, message framing and intention to eat ethnic food. Study 1 was to test the influence of regulatory focus on intention to eat ethnic food, and the mediation role of food neophobia. Study 2 was to test the moderation role of message framing.

Findings

Results indicated that consumers with promotion focus have higher intention to eat ethnic food than consumers with prevention focus. Prevention-focus consumers have higher food neophobia, which leads to lower intention to eat ethnic food. Food neophobia plays the mediating role in the relationship between regulatory focus and intention to eat ethnic food. Regulatory fit can increase consumers’ intention to eat ethnic food. Promotion-focus consumers show higher eating intention in gain-framing situation, while prevention-focus consumers show higher eating intention in loss-framing situation.

Research limitations/implications

The study was undertaken in China. Further studies should include respondents living in countries other than China.

Practical implications

This research provides a venue for marketers of destination tourism, especially for ethnic food marketers to introduce and advertise ethnic foods to tourists. Regulatory fit is important for destination tourism. To improve consumers’ eating intention, this research suggests that ethnic food marketers should pay attention to regulatory focus of consumers from different regions and cultural background, and design corresponding message framing for consumers with different regulatory focus to form regulatory fit.

Originality/value

First, this study has proposed and tested regulatory focus’ effect on intention to consumer ethnic food. Food neophobia is used to explain the mechanism of relation between regulatory focus and intention to eat ethnic food. Also, message framing is introduced to define the boundary of relation between regulatory focus and intention to eat ethnic food.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Pei-Ju Wu, Mu-Chen Chen and Chih-Kai Tsau

Cargo loss has been a major issue in logistics management. However, few studies have tackled the issue of cargo loss severity via business analytics. Hence, the purpose of…

2133

Abstract

Purpose

Cargo loss has been a major issue in logistics management. However, few studies have tackled the issue of cargo loss severity via business analytics. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to provide guidance about how to retrieve valuable information from logistics data and to develop cargo loss mitigation strategies for logistics risk management.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes a research design of business analytics to scrutinize the causes of cargo loss severity.

Findings

The empirical results of the decision tree analytics reveal that transit types, product categories, and shipping destinations are key factors behind cargo loss severity. Furthermore, strategies for cargo loss prevention were developed.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed framework of cargo loss analytics provides a research foundation for logistics risk management.

Practical implications

Companies with logistics data can utilize the proposed business analytics to identify cargo loss factors, while companies without logistics data can employ the proposed cargo loss mitigation strategies in their logistics systems.

Originality/value

This pioneer empirical study scrutinizes the critical cargo loss issues of cargo damage, cargo theft, and cargo liability insurance through exploiting real cargo loss data.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Soo Yeong Ewe, Christina Kwai Choi Lee and Ferdinand A. Gul

This study examines the effect of a regulatory-focused prime (i.e. a brochure with a picture and message) on the recommending behavior of investment advisers in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the effect of a regulatory-focused prime (i.e. a brochure with a picture and message) on the recommending behavior of investment advisers in the context of an investment decision.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments were conducted with 468 participants, mostly from the financial services industry. Study 1 examined the direct effect of a regulatory-focused prime on an investment adviser's recommending behavior, whereas Study 2 examined the moderating role of regulatory fit on such behavior. Study 3 validated the findings.

Findings

The results provide evidence that a message using visual and textual cues based on a promotion and prevention regulatory focus may trigger a preference in an investment adviser's product recommendation. A promotion (prevention)-focused framed message will trigger the recommendation of an investment plan with a higher but riskier (safe and stable) potential return. However, when the same prime is presented with details of a performance incentive scheme, the effect of the prime is reduced when there is a regulatory nonfit between the prime and the message relating to the performance incentive scheme.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the importance of understanding how regulatory-focused stimuli may subconsciously influence the recommendation of investment advisers as heuristics used in decision-making, thereby influencing their clients' investment decisions.

Originality/value

Past studies have focused on how regulatory-focused visual and message cues influence consumer decision-making. This study provides empirical evidence regarding the influence of regulatory-focused prime on an investment adviser's behavior when providing investment advice.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 April 2022

Peter C. Young

The evolution of risk management has placed some emphasis on the language of risk management practices. The classic categories risk control and risk financing, as umbrella…

Abstract

The evolution of risk management has placed some emphasis on the language of risk management practices. The classic categories risk control and risk financing, as umbrella terms for the range of risk management tools that may be employed, are still widely used – but as has been pointed out elsewhere in this book, the broadening of risk management has led to a reconsideration of the continuing accuracy and usefulness of the older terminology. For example, historically the term insurance-buying was expanded to include risk financing, which allowed recognition of newer, non-insurance tools. Similarly, loss prevention became risk control to include risk reduction, risk distribution, hedging, and more. More recently, risk treatment has emerged as a term that encompasses both the control and financing categories.

One of the significant changes in practice is the inclusion of opportunities that may arise from risks. Here the terminology has not quite kept pace with changes in the field. Additionally, while assessment and analysis has long captured the idea of evaluating risks and uncertainties, the more explicit inclusion of uncertainty, along with emergent phenomena, complexity, and the unknown/unknowable has led to questions about whether risk control meaningfully conveys the essence of these activities. The search for an alternative terminology is ongoing, but for the time being the term adaptive response (AR) is used here, which refers to a range of actions that could be taken to capture the full range of exposures.

Chapters Nine and Ten continue to use the term risk financing. This is more of a concession to practicality as, in any other setting, financial measures logically are ARs. Nevertheless, there are technical and substantive reasons to maintain some separation. But even here, the pressures of change are being felt. For example, while most risk financing arrangements focus on addressing the costs of risk (e.g. indemnifying an organisation for losses), the role of financial measures in encouraging or discouraging certain practices – including paying the risk manager’s salary, or incentivising certain desired practices – has historically not been considered in discussions

Details

Public Sector Leadership in Assessing and Addressing Risk
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-947-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

John Guthrie and Anna Guthrie

The purpose of the paper is to draw attention to an area of research that has considerable potential for academic researchers in the disciplines of retailing and…

1786

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to draw attention to an area of research that has considerable potential for academic researchers in the disciplines of retailing and distribution studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology adopted was an overview of existing literature with a view to identifying possible trends in research in the area of loss prevention.

Findings

The paper identifies an extensive body of existing literature and provides an indication of areas for future research in loss prevention.

Practical implications

The implications of these key issues are significant to the measurement of shrinkage in terms of the scope across the business from which shrinkage needs to be considered. This finding highlights the need to consider shrinkage as a systemic issue that extends across a business from design, through planning to operational execution. It also identifies the impact of shrinkage on increasing cost and depressing sales and considers the responsibility of management teams in addressing these matters.

Originality/value

This paper is an original discussion on the topic and thus of value to the academic community. It is also of value to the practitioner community as it highlights the importance of developing relationships with the academic community.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 34 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 May 2019

Chioma Vivian Amasiatu and Mahmood Hussain Shah

First-party fraud in which retail consumers commit fraud against retailers is a growing problem. However, to date studies on retail crime have focused almost entirely on…

Abstract

Purpose

First-party fraud in which retail consumers commit fraud against retailers is a growing problem. However, to date studies on retail crime have focused almost entirely on fraudulent consumer behaviours in physical stores. With the growth of e-commerce, the losses to retailers from this fraud are growing so there is strong need to research this problem from multiple perspectives. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted three case studies and a total of 24 semi-structured interviews with retail managers, and evaluated their existing prevention-related documentation. Fraud management lifecycle theory was used to organise and discuss the findings.

Findings

The authors found that many retailers are treating this problem as just a cost of doing business online and have no detailed plans for dealing with this problem or any reporting to law enforcement agencies. However, they have begun working with delivery companies for delivery accuracy. Use of convenience stores as collection points is also showing early improvements.

Research limitations/implications

The small number of cases and interviews used is a limitation of this study. However, the authors believe that the findings are useful for advancing knowledge in this emerging research area.

Practical implications

This study provides insight into existing management practices in this domain, and makes recommendations on how to improve the management of first-party fraud. The study also makes a case for increased managerial interest and involvement in reducing first-party fraud. The study also helps bridge a glaring gap in existing literature and provides useful leads for further research.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the existing practices employed to manage first-party fraud in e-retail.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Elyse N. Mowle, Emily J. Georgia, Brian D. Doss and John A. Updegraff

The purpose of this paper is to test the utility of regulatory focus theory principles in a real-world setting; specifically, Internet hosted text advertisements. Effect…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the utility of regulatory focus theory principles in a real-world setting; specifically, Internet hosted text advertisements. Effect of compatibility of the ad text with the regulatory focus of the consumer was examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Advertisements were created using Google AdWords. Data were collected for the number of views and clicks each ad received. Effect of regulatory fit was measured using logistic regression.

Findings

Logistic regression analyses demonstrated that there was a strong main effect for keyword, such that users were almost six times as likely to click on a promotion advertisement as a prevention advertisement, as well as a main effect for compatibility, such that users were twice as likely to click on an advertisement with content that was consistent with their keyword. Finally, there was a strong interaction of these two variables, such that the effect of consistent advertisements was stronger for promotion searches than for prevention searches.

Research limitations/implications

The effect of ad compatibility had medium to large effect sizes, suggesting that individuals’ state may have more influence on advertising response than do individuals’ traits (e.g. personality traits). Measurement of regulatory fit was limited by the constraints of Google AdWords.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide a possible framework for ad creation for Internet advertisers.

Originality/value

This paper is the first study to demonstrate the utility of regulatory focus theory in online advertising.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 31 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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