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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2018

Ahmed Bouteska and Boutheina Regaieg

The current study aims to investigate the impacts of two behavioral biases, namely, loss aversion and overconfidence on the performance of US companies. First, the impact…

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Abstract

Purpose

The current study aims to investigate the impacts of two behavioral biases, namely, loss aversion and overconfidence on the performance of US companies. First, the impact of loss aversion on the economic performance of companies was assessed. Second, the impact of overconfidence on market performance was discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used around 6,777 quarterly observations on the population of US-insured industrial and services companies over the 2006-2016 period. Ordinary least squares (OLS) regression in two panel data models were used to test the hypotheses formulated for the study.

Findings

It was documented that the loss-aversion bias negatively affects the economic performance of companies and this is achieved for both sectors. In contrast, the findings suggest that overconfidence positively affects market performance of industrial firms but negatively affects market performance in service firms. Further robust evidence was found that overconfidence bias seems to be dominant, and hence, investors may tend to be more overconfident rather than more loss-averse.

Originality/value

This research can be extended by focusing on the following question: What is the impact of the contradictory (positive and negative) effects of an investor's loss aversion and overconfidence on the US company performance in case of realization of a stock market crisis or stock market crash?

Details

Journal of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science, vol. 25 no. 50
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-1886

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2021

Shilpi Gupta and Monica Shrivastava

The study aims to understand the impact of loss aversion and herding on investment decision of retail investors. The study further evaluates the mediating role of fear of…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to understand the impact of loss aversion and herding on investment decision of retail investors. The study further evaluates the mediating role of fear of missing out (FOMO) in retail investors on these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed questionnaire survey to collect data from retail investors of Indian stock market. Total 323 data were collected. The collected data were examined using SmartPLS. Factor analysis and partial least square structural equation modeling were employed for fulfilling the objectives of the study.

Findings

The results of the study revealed that investment decisions of retail investors are significantly influenced by loss aversion, herd behavior as well as FOMO. Assessing the impact of herd behavior and loss aversion on investment decision in presence and absence of FOMO exposed that FOMO partially mediates these relations. The mediation was complementary in nature as the presence of FOMO increased the influence of loss aversion and herd behavior on retail investor's investment decisions.

Practical implications

Behavioral predispositions are accountable for numerous irregularities in stock markets. Thus, it is quite substantial to realize the stimulus of these partialities on investment decisions. The outcomes of this study would help financial planners and investors to keep in mind the different ways their decision outcomes could be biased and try to ignore them.

Originality/value

Though there have been many studies conducted on behavioral biases and their impact on investment decisions, there are very few studies that have taken into account the FOMO factor in investment, in context of the behavioral biases. Theoretically, FOMO has been linked with herd behavior and greed of earning more, but there are very few empirical supports to this fact. Thus, this study is an attempt to fill this gap by examining the role of FOMO on investment decisions and the different biases associated with it.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Ankita Bhatia, Arti Chandani, Rajiv Divekar, Mita Mehta and Neeraja Vijay

Innovation is the way of life and we see various innovative techniques and methods being introduced in our daily life. This study aims to focus on digital innovation in…

Abstract

Purpose

Innovation is the way of life and we see various innovative techniques and methods being introduced in our daily life. This study aims to focus on digital innovation in the wealth management domain. This study examines the effect of usage of robo-advisory services in investment decision-making and behavioural biases, i.e. overconfidence and loss aversion. Such studies are more pronounced in developed countries and little has been studied about investor behaviour in association with advisory services in developing countries such as India.

Design/methodology/approach

Overconfidence and loss-aversion biases, investment decision-making and advisory services questions are measured using a five-point Likert scale. The number of respondents was 172 investors. A purposive sampling is used for gathering responses from investors. Structural equation modeling model was run using AMOS 22 version software package.

Findings

The authors found that behavioural biases positively and significantly influence the irrationalities of investment decision-making. The findings of this study also provide empirical evidence that the usage of robo-advisory services, by individual investors, is still incapable of mitigating behavioural biases, such as overconfidence bias and loss-aversion bias.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size of this study could be a limiting factor. This study is limited only to two biases, while other behavioural biases affect the investment decision-making of the investors, which can be considered for future research along with the impact of robo-advisory services in different socio-cultural backgrounds.

Practical implications

This study will assist fintech start-ups, banks, architecture of robo advisors, product owners and wealth management service providers improvise their products, platforms and offerings of these automated advisory services. This could help individual investors to mitigate their behavioural biases in investment decision-making.

Social implications

This study is useful to society as the awareness of robo-advisory services is very less, at present, and there is a need to increase the usage of these services to extend the benefit of this to the lower stratum of society. These services would be useful to all investors who find it difficult to afford financial advisors and help them mitigate their behavioural biases for investment decision-making.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its type that establishes the linkage between behavioural biases, digital innovation in fintech, i.e. robo-advisory services and individual investor’s investment decision-making in individual investor of the Indian stock market.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 March 2019

Renu Isidore R. and Christie P.

The purpose of this paper is to test the relationship between the annual income earned by the investors and eight behavioural biases exhibited by the investors such as…

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4570

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the relationship between the annual income earned by the investors and eight behavioural biases exhibited by the investors such as mental accounting, anchoring, gambler’s fallacy, availability, loss aversion, regret aversion, representativeness and overconfidence.

Design/methodology/approach

The relationship is derived based on a questionnaire survey conducted on 436 secondary equity investors residing in Chennai, India.

Findings

Analysis of variance test was performed on the normalised and non-normalised version of the biases divided in terms of the annual income earned by the investor. The test found that for the significant biases except the overconfidence bias, the investors with higher annual income were less prone to the biases when compared to investors with lower annual income. On the other hand, with respect to the overconfidence bias, the investors with higher annual income were prone to exhibit overconfidence bias when compared to the investors with lower annual income. Correlation analysis showed that the investors with high annual income were more likely to exhibit higher overconfidence bias but lower representativeness, loss aversion, availability and mental accounting biases.

Originality/value

A contribution in the financial and economic front which would benefit the financial advisors to now consider the income earned by the clients as an important factor while giving financial advice to the clients and while guiding them about the biases they are prone to exhibit.

Details

Journal of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science, vol. 24 no. 47
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-1886

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Syed Aliya Zahera and Rohit Bansal

The purpose of this paper is to study and describe several biases in investment decision-making through the review of research articles in the area of behavioral finance…

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7870

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study and describe several biases in investment decision-making through the review of research articles in the area of behavioral finance. It also includes some of the analytical and foundational work and how this has progressed over the years to make behavioral finance an established and specific area of study. The study includes behavioral patterns of individual investors, institutional investors and financial advisors.

Design/methodology/approach

The research papers are analyzed on the basis of searching the keywords related to behavioral finance on various published journals, conference proceedings, working papers and some other published books. These papers are collected over a period of year’s right from the time when the most introductory paper was published (1979) that contributed this area a basic foundation till the most recent papers (2016). These articles are segregated into biases wise, year-wise, country-wise and author wise. All research tools that have been used by authors related to primary and secondary data have also been included into our table.

Findings

A new era of understanding of human emotions, behavior and sentiments has been started which was earlier dominated by the study of financial markets. Moreover, this area is not only attracting the, attention of academicians but also of the various corporates, financial intermediaries and entrepreneurs thus adding to its importance. The study is more inclined toward the study of individual and institutional investors and financial advisors’ investors but the behavior of intermediaries through which some of them invest should be focused upon, narrowing down population into various variables, targeting the expanding economies to reap some unexplained theories. This study has identified 17 different types of biases and also summarized in the form of tables.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on some of the most recent findings to have a quick overview of the latest work carried out in this area. So far very few extensive review papers have been published to highlight the research work in the area of behavioral finance. This study will be helpful for new researches in this field and to identify the areas where possible work can be done.

Practical implications

Practical implication of the research is that companies, policymakers and issuers of securities can watch out of investors’ interest before issuing securities into the market.

Social implications

Under the Social Implication, investors can recognize several behavioral biases, take sound investment decisions and can also minimize their risk.

Originality/value

The essence of this paper is the identification of 17 types of biases and the literature related to them. The study is based on both, the literature on investment decisions and the biases in investment decision-making. Such study is less prevalent in the developing country like India. This paper does not only focus on the basic principles of behavioral finance but also explain some emerging concepts and theories of behavioral finance. Thus, the paper generates interest in the readers to find the solutions to minimize the effect of biases in decision-making.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2017

Brittany Harker Martin

Managerial mindset and cognitive bias can be barriers to any transformation strategy. In the case of telework, most employees express willingness to telework, yet, few…

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1325

Abstract

Purpose

Managerial mindset and cognitive bias can be barriers to any transformation strategy. In the case of telework, most employees express willingness to telework, yet, few firms formally enable it during regular business hours. The status quo is a daily commute to the traditional workplace. The purpose of this paper is to test framing interventions designed to harness cognitive biases through choice architecture.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon behavioral strategy and prospect theory, this paper presents two studies: quasi-experiments with 146 senior business students and experiments in the field (replication using random assignment and extension) with 84 senior decision makers. Both studies use a one-way between-subjects design and chi-square analysis.

Findings

Findings support the proposition that, although cognitive biases can act as barriers to transformation, they can be re-framed through strategic interventions. Specifically, in both studies, there was a drastic increase in adoption simply by changing the way the choice was presented. Findings in the lab were cross-validated in the field. Observed shifts in preferences provide evidence that embedding the right reference point within communications can frame a decision choice more favorably. Findings also support that a bias for an implicitly perceived status quo can be overruled through an explicitly stated reference point.

Research limitations/implications

It is an assumption of behavioral strategy that most individuals simply respond to the gains/loss framing without being influenced by other psychological or contextual factors, and though these effects dissipate through aggregation, it is a limitation nonetheless. Indeed, using an individual construct to explain an organizational phenomenon is a well-debated topic in the field of strategy, with proponents on both sides. The distinguishing factor, here, is that behavioral strategists are only interested in results at the aggregated level.

Practical implications

Practitioners attempting to roll out telework adoption, or any transformation, now have proven strategies for designing frames of reference that intervene against and harness the power of loss aversion and the status quo.

Social implications

This paper measures micro processes that have an effect at the macro level. It explains systematic aversion to adoption as an aggregation of decision-making behavior that is seemingly subconscious. In doing so, it highlights the impact of bounded rationality perpetuated through social systems, while measuring effective interventions designed to make systematic behavior more predictable.

Originality/value

A novel contribution is made in designing/testing a new frame for systematic resistance to change that frames the status quo as the losing prospect. In this frame, the perceived loss is in the choice not to change, and loss aversion proves to be an effective tool for facilitating systematic change.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2019

Jinesh Jain, Nidhi Walia and Sanjay Gupta

Research in the area of behavioral finance has demonstrated that investors exhibit irrational behavior while making investment decisions. Investor behavior usually…

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1577

Abstract

Purpose

Research in the area of behavioral finance has demonstrated that investors exhibit irrational behavior while making investment decisions. Investor behavior usually deviates from logic and reason, and consequently, investors exhibit various behavioral biases which impact their investment decisions. The purpose of this paper is to rank the behavioral biases influencing the investment decision making of individual equity investors from the state of Punjab, India. This research would provide valuable insight into the different behavioral biases to investors and other participants of the capital market and help them in improving investment decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is conducted on the individual equity investors of Punjab, India. Fuzzy analytic hierarchy process was applied to rank the factors influencing the decision making of individual equity investors of Punjab. The primary factors considered for the study are overconfidence bias, representative bias, anchoring bias, availability bias, regret aversion bias, loss aversion bias, mental accounting bias and herding bias.

Findings

The three most influential criteria were herding bias, loss aversion bias and overconfidence bias. The five most influential sub-criteria were “I readily sell shares that have increased in value (C61),” “News about the company (Newspapers, TV and magazines) affects my investment decision (C84),” “I invest each element of my investment portfolio separately (C71)” and “I usually hold loosing stock for long time, expecting trend reversal (C52).”

Research limitations/implications

Although sample survey conducted in the present study was based on a limited sample selected from a particular area that truly represented the total population, it is considered as the limitation of this study.

Practical implications

The outcome of this research provides investors with a better understanding of behavioral biases that influence their decision making. This study provides them a guideline on different behavioral biases that they should consider while making investment decisions.

Originality/value

The research model is based on the available literature on behavioral finance and the research results and findings would add value to the existing knowledge base.

Details

Review of Behavioral Finance, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2021

Jinesh Jain, Nidhi Walia, Manpreet Kaur and Simarjeet Singh

The advocates of behavioural finance have denounced the existing literature on investors’ rationality in the decision-making process and questioned the existence of…

Abstract

Purpose

The advocates of behavioural finance have denounced the existing literature on investors’ rationality in the decision-making process and questioned the existence of efficient markets and rational investors. Although diversified research has been conducted in the area of behavioural finance, yet there is a need of further explorations into the field as the available knowledge base is confined to one or a few behavioural biases confronted by investors while making investment decisions. Hence, this study aims to develop a comprehensive, reliable and valid scale to measure the behavioural biases affecting investors’ decision-making process.

Design/methodology/approach

To develop a comprehensive, reliable and valid scale for measuring the behavioural biases affecting investors’ decision-making process, rigorous multi-stage scale development methodology has been followed. Stage one started with an extensive review of the literature followed by interviews from experienced stockbrokers to clarify construct and getting novel insights about dimensions of behavioural biases. In stage two, 52 items measuring the dimensions of behavioural biases were generated and got evaluated from panel of judges. Pilot testing was done in the third stage which gave a set of 39 items. Finally, in fourth stage, data were collected from 332 individual equity investors on a 7-point Likert scale using the snowball sampling technique.

Findings

The results of the study highlighted that behavioural biases is a multidimensional phenomenon that significantly affects investors’ decisions and has different dimensions, namely, Availability Bias, Representativeness Bias, Overconfidence Bias, Market Factors, Herding, Anchoring, Mental Accounting, Regret Aversion, Gamblers’ Fallacy and Loss Aversion. The present research has developed a comprehensive, reliable and valid scale for measuring behavioural biases affecting equity investors’ decision-making process.

Originality/value

Behavioural finance is an emerging area in the field of research particularly in the Indian context which needs further exploration. The present research concentrates on rendering an empirically tested scale to the researchers for measuring the behavioural biases and its impact on investor’s decision-making. Such an instrument can contribute to making progress in the area of behavioural finance and other research studies may also find it useful to achieve their goals.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Nurcan Deniz

Expert evaluation is the backbone of the multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) techniques. The experts make pairwise comparisons between criteria or alternatives in this…

Abstract

Purpose

Expert evaluation is the backbone of the multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) techniques. The experts make pairwise comparisons between criteria or alternatives in this evaluation. The mainstream research focus on the ambiguity in this process and use fuzzy logic. On the other hand, cognitive biases are the other but scarcely studied challenges to make accurate decisions. The purpose of this paper is to propose pilot filters – as a debiasing strategy – embedded in the MCDM techniques to reduce the effects of framing effect, loss aversion and status quo-type cognitive biases. The applicability of the proposed methodology is shown with analytic hierarchy process-based Technique for Order-Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution method through a sustainable supplier selection problem.

Design/methodology/approach

The first filter's aim is to reduce framing bias with restructuring the questions. To manipulate the weights of criteria according to the degree of expected status quo and loss aversion biases is the second filter's aim. The second filter is implemented to a sustainable supplier selection problem.

Findings

The comparison of the results of biased and debiased ranking indicates that the best and worst suppliers did not change, but the ranking of suppliers changed. As a result, it is shown that, to obtain more accurate results, employing debiasing strategies is beneficial.

Originality/value

To the best of the author's knowledge, this approach is a novel way to cope with the cognitive biases. Applying this methodology easily to other MCDM techniques will help the decision makers to take more accurate decisions.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Investment Traps Exposed
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-253-4

1 – 10 of over 2000