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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Lorraine Paterson and Boon Low

This paper aims to provide quantitative and qualitative data on students' use of mobile devices and to consider the benefit of academic mobile library services to students.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide quantitative and qualitative data on students' use of mobile devices and to consider the benefit of academic mobile library services to students.

Design/methodology/approach

Initial mobile library research included an online survey that attracted 1,716 participants. This was followed up with two discussion groups of six undergraduate and five postgraduate students. The survey followed‐on from an earlier survey conducted by the University of Edinburgh's Information Services (IS) in March 2010.

Findings

The dramatic growth of smartphone ownership among students in an eight‐month period was surprising: a 17 per cent increase between March and November 2010. In addition, 68 per cent of students who plan to change their mobile handset would upgrade to a smartphone.

Research limitations/implications

As students were unable to provide feedback on University of Edinburgh's own mobile library services, their feedback is speculative and subject to change.

Practical implications

The paper provides evidence for libraries to determine the value of developing their own mobile services. It also demonstrates the proliferation of mobile device usage within the university and library context and indicates which services students would find most useful on a mobile device.

Originality/value

The paper provides insight into a rapidly moving area of technology as demonstrated through the research. The increasing use of mobile devices among students is important to acknowledge. The role of the academic library is to embrace changing student behaviour by providing services optimised for mobile devices.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 January 2009

Frank Crowther

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Cara Berg

The purpose of this paper is to highlight an assessment tool that can be used for all information literacy classes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight an assessment tool that can be used for all information literacy classes.

Design/methodology/approach

The assessment was designed and data were stored using Google Forms. Questions were basic, general questions about student confidence after attending a library instruction class. The assessment was piloted in the Fall 2015 semester, improved on and reissued in the Spring 2016 semester and is now in its current iteration as a tool to be used by most librarians.

Findings

The first two implementations were successful, but issues arose in distribution and in the type of questions. Tweaks to the distribution that would work in any computer lab on any campus were beneficial to librarians and students. The content of the questions were also modified after the first two implementations; questions about recalling resources were condensed and changed to questions on what the students learned and what they were still unsure of. All implementations showed positive results from the students on their confidence level after library instruction.

Originality/value

This tool and the implementation methods are versatile enough to be used at any kind of institution and with any general learning objective. Assessment is essential in library instruction; this tool provides a way for all librarians to quickly assess their class without taking much additional class time. In addition to the individual librarian, this is also useful for reporting statistics to the college administration if data are needed on the assessment of library instruction.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2010

Sharon Q. Yang and Kurt Wagner

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and compare open source and proprietary discovery tools and find out how much discovery tools have achieved towards becoming the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and compare open source and proprietary discovery tools and find out how much discovery tools have achieved towards becoming the next generation catalog.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper summarizes characteristics of the next generation catalog into a check‐list of 12 features. This list was checked against each of seven open source and ten proprietary discovery tools to determine if those features were present or absent in those tools.

Findings

Discovery tools have many next generation catalog features, but only a few can be called real next generation catalogs. Federated searching and relevancy based on circulation statistics are the two areas that both open source and proprietary discovery tools are missing. Open source discovery tools seem to be bolder and more innovative than proprietary tools in embracing advanced features of the next generation catalog. Vendors of discovery tools may need to quicken their steps in catching up.

Originality/value

It is the first evaluation and comparison of open source and proprietary discovery tools on a large scale. It will provide information as to exactly where discovery tools stand in light of the much desired next generation catalog.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Leading Local Government: The Role of Directly Elected Mayors
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-650-1

Abstract

Details

The Study and Practice of Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-617-9

Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Lorraine Eden

The digital economy, which heralds the start of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (IR4), is upon us. What can history teach international business scholars about how firms…

Abstract

The digital economy, which heralds the start of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (IR4), is upon us. What can history teach international business scholars about how firms are likely to respond to this new form of technological change? Who are the likely winners or the likely losers? For 30 years, the author has lived through, studied, and written about the Third Industrial Revolution and other major environmental shocks, ranging from new entrants to academia to regional integration to outbreak of war, looking at the fundamental issues of how individuals, firms, communities, and countries respond to and are affected by life-changing events. In this chapter, the author tells seven brief stories about living through and studying “shocks and responses.” Perhaps, some of these stories may provide useful lessons to the scholars of IR4.

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Maureen Charlebois, Lois Cormack, Imtiaz David, Kevin Leonard, Lorraine Pederson, Bonnie Painter and Flavian Pinto

Describes a project undertaken to study the communication preferences of primary care physicians (PCPs) when they interact with Community Care Access Centres (called…

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Abstract

Describes a project undertaken to study the communication preferences of primary care physicians (PCPs) when they interact with Community Care Access Centres (called CCACs; they provide a brokering role coordinating community providers of health services). Specifically, examines how information technology can be utilized to enhance communication between these two types of health care providers. At present, physician notification of client admission to a CCAC is done inconsistently and often, due to confidentiality issues, only the client name and other notification data are faxed to the family practitioner. With a majority of the referrals originating directly from hospitals, CCACs wish to improve this communication link with PCPs in order to enhance the coordination of client care as well as the management of their clients’ health outcomes.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-0756

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1974

Tom Schultheiss, Lorraine Hartline, Phyllis Rosenstock, Jean Mandeberg and Sue Stern

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to…

Abstract

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to supplement the RSR review column, “Recent Reference Books,” by Frances Neel Cheney. “Reference Books in Print” includes all additional books received prior to the inclusion deadline established for this issue. Appearance in this column does not preclude a later review in RSR. Publishers are urged to send a copy of all new reference books directly to RSR as soon as published, for immediate listing in “Reference Books in Print.” Reference books with imprints older than two years will not be included (with the exception of current reprints or older books newly acquired for distribution by another publisher). The column shall also occasionally include library science or other library related publications of other than a reference character.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Babak Vaseghi, Noureddine Takorabet and Farid Meibody‐Tabar

The purpose of this paper is to present a study and analysis of insulation failure inter‐turn fault in induction machines (IMs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a study and analysis of insulation failure inter‐turn fault in induction machines (IMs).

Design/methodology/approach

A time stepping finite element method (FEM) analysis is performed for the study of IM with inter‐turn fault and determining the machine parameters (self and mutual inductances) after occurring fault. A simple dynamic model for IM with inter‐turn fault is presented. The model parameters are obtained by FEM analysis. An experimental test is also carried out to verify the results.

Findings

The behavior of IM is studied under various insulation failure inter‐turn fault conditions and severity using FEM. The paper's results help the machine designers to improve the fault tolerance as well the overall design of the machine drive system. It can also be useful for predict and detection of fault in IM.

Practical implications

Predicting and detection of turn faults in IM are in industry very helpful because it avoids the fully damage of IM and it is more easy to repair the machine. Designing a fault tolerant IM is required in some applications for increasing the reliability.

Originality/value

By using FEM for studying the fault, the machine parameters which are calculated with FEM and the study's results are very precise and accurate because the flux fluctuation after occurring fault has been taken into account. On the other hand, the fault model is very fast, global and accurate. It can be used in model‐based health monitoring systems.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

Keywords

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