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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Emma Charlotte Maskell and Lorna Collins

The purpose of this paper is to provide a general review of “student engagement” with a focus on the measurement of student engagement in UK higher education. A wide…

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1001

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a general review of “student engagement” with a focus on the measurement of student engagement in UK higher education. A wide variation in how the construct is measured has made it difficult for institutional researchers to compare findings across studies. This study seeks to understand more about the measurement of student engagement by examining the reliability and validity of three national student surveys: National Survey of Student Engagement, National Student Survey and UK Engagement Survey.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a narrative review of literature, each survey method is examined to identify the strands of student engagement they can be applied, to determine to what extent survey results can be benchmarked across institutions, and to explore their potential use in institutional led research. Kahu’s (2013) four perspectives of engagement are adopted as a framework for analysis as they represent student engagement as a fluid, multifaceted and, at times, abstract construct.

Findings

Findings support the notion that a single instrument cannot examine all facets of this complex construct and that student surveys currently collect information on limited and discrete perspectives of engagement. The use of these three surveys provides a depth and breadth of information about student engagement; however, institutions need to maintain an open dialogue about the construct to ensure its validity, and how to measure and understand it.

Originality/value

Student engagement as a construct continues to evolve and change. This paper adds to the call for institutional researchers to continue to engage in debate about the validity of the construct. The need to maintain essential knowledge of the construct and its many facets is necessary, as is the need to incorporate such knowledge into ongoing work to provide accurate, actionable data to guide improvement and enhancement research.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Lorna Collins, Barbara Murray and Ken McCracken

This paper is a conversation piece which highlights the ways in which succession planning in large company might be handled. The discussion focuses on Christopher Oughtred…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a conversation piece which highlights the ways in which succession planning in large company might be handled. The discussion focuses on Christopher Oughtred the former Chairman of William Jackson Food Group, one of the largest family businesses in the UK. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a conversation with a panel of leading family business experts and a family business owner. The paper presents latest thoughts on family business research, insights into a real family business succession project and reflections from a former Chairman on the succession process.

Findings

Findings highlight possible stages and requirements of a successful transition and succession plan. Also suggestions for areas of further research are presented.

Originality/value

The conversation recorded in this paper represents a rare opportunity to obtain reflections and insights on a succession process and how it was managed in a large family business. The conversation also highlights the kinds of challenges often experienced by family businesses during transition and succession. As a case study this is an exemplar of how succession might be planned.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Lorna Collins

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231

Abstract

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Lorna Collins

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355

Abstract

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Lorna Collins, Ken McCracken, Barbara Murray and Martin Stepek

This paper is the first in a regular series of articles in JFBM that will share “a conversation with” thought leaders who are active in the family business space. The…

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270

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is the first in a regular series of articles in JFBM that will share “a conversation with” thought leaders who are active in the family business space. The world of family business is, like many other arenas, constantly evolving and as the authors learn more about how and why families “do business” the approaches and tools for working with them also evolve. The purpose of this paper is to stimulate further new research in areas that practically affect family businesses and to “open the door” to practical insights that will excite researchers and provide impetus for new and exciting study. The specific purpose of this paper is to explore “what is strong governance.” There has been much interest in governance lately yet there is a tendency to treat governance in a formulaic way such that, at the moment, the notion that every family business must have a family council or a formal structure in order to be considered “effective” and “successful” predominates. The authors’ panel challenges and discusses this notion drawing on the experience and knowledge as family business advisors, consultants and owners.

Design/methodology/approach

The impetus for this particular conversation is a result of a brainstorming conversation that Lorna Collins and Barbara Murray held in February 2014 where they focussed on “how JFBM can encourage and stimulate researchers to engage in aspects of research that makes a difference to the family business in a practical way.” This paper reports a conversation between Barbara Murray (Barbara), Ken McCracken (Ken) and Martin Stepek (Martin), three leading lights in the UK family business advising space, all of whom have been involved in running or advising family businesses for more than three decades, held in August 2015. The conversation was held via telephone and lasted just over 60 minutes. Lorna Collins acted as moderator.

Findings

Strong governance is not just about instituting a “family council” or embedding formal governance mechanisms in a family business. Evolutionary adaption by family members usually prevails such that any mechanism is changed and adapted over time to suit and fit the needs of the family business. Many successful family businesses do not have recognized “formal” governance mechanisms but, it is contended, they are still highly successful and effective. Future areas of research in governance are also suggested.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the family business discourse because the debate it reports challenges the basic assumptions upon which much consulting and advisory practice is conducted. It also challenges the notion of “best practice” and what is “new best practice” and how is it that any “best practice” is determined to be “best.” Furthermore, the panel provides insights in to the “impact of family dynamics on governance” and “the impact of family dynamics on advisors.” The paper content is original in that it provides an authentic and timely narrative between active family business practitioners who are also scholars and owners.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Haya Al-Dajani, Zografia Bika, Lorna Collins and Janine Swail

This editorial aims to investigate the interface between gendered processes and family business by exploring the extent to which gendered processes are reinforced (or not…

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1497

Abstract

Purpose

This editorial aims to investigate the interface between gendered processes and family business by exploring the extent to which gendered processes are reinforced (or not) in family business operations and dynamics. This approach will complement the agency and resource-based view theoretical bases that dominate family business research (Chrisman et al., 2009) and further contribute to extending gender theories.

Design/methodology/approach

Acknowledging that gender is socially constructed, this editorial discusses the interface between gendered processes and family business within entrepreneurship research.

Findings

Despite a growing interest in gender and family business, there is limited literature that explores gender theory within family business research. A gender theory approach embracing family business research contributes to a needed theoretical deconstruction of existing perspectives on the operations, sustainability and succession of family businesses in the twenty-first century.

Originality/value

This editorial makes a contribution to extant scholarship by extending gender theories through an exploration of the gendered processes in family business research.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Lorna Collins and Nicholas O’Regan

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220

Abstract

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Jennifer Martinez Ferrero, Lázaro Rodríguez-Ariza and Manuel Bermejo-Sánchez

This paper considers the association between family firms and managerial discretion, hypothesising that a higher degree of family ownership may decrease the conflict of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper considers the association between family firms and managerial discretion, hypothesising that a higher degree of family ownership may decrease the conflict of interest between owners and managers, thus avoiding the risk of discretionary actions by the latter.

Design/methodology/approach

Our empirical analysis is based on a large sample of international listed companies from 20 countries including the Special Administrative Region of Hong Kong and covers the period 2002–2010. Methodologically, we use a logit model with marginal effects on the panel data.

Findings

Our analysis shows that family ownership is associated with greater control and monitoring of managerial decisions, thus avoiding information asymmetries and, therefore, the risk of discretionary actions. In other words, family owners impose a stronger discipline and dissuade non-family managers from using managerial discretion to act in their own interest. Finally, we clarify the inconclusive results reported previously about the effects of family ownership on discretionary practices.

Originality/value

Our paper contributes to the family firm literature by providing evidence of the impact of ownership structure on the level of discretionay practices. Furthermore, we explore the differences between family and non-family firms as each group has its own varied characteristics. Moreover, in contrast to most previous studies, which have focused on only one country, we extend the analysis to include an international sample of 20 countries. This leads to potentially more powerful and generalizable results.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Archie Lockamy, Charles M Carson and Franz T Lohrke

The purpose of this study is to identify the key determinants which inhibit intra-family business succession. The study also explores the effects these determinants have…

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1469

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify the key determinants which inhibit intra-family business succession. The study also explores the effects these determinants have on preventing intra-family business succession. Finally, the study explores the probability that intra-family business succession does not take place based upon the effects of the identified determinants.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 250 surveys were mailed to family business owners across the United States, yielding 68 usable responses (27.2% response rate). Factor analysis was used to determine the most influential factors which inhibit intra-family business succession, and Bayesian Networks were constructed to determine the probability that intra-family business succession does not occur based on these factors.

Findings

The study results indicate that there are four key constructs comprised of 23 variables which have the most influence on deterring intra-family business successions. The results also suggest managerial actions that can be taken to improve the probability of intra-family business succession.

Research limitations/implications

A possible research limitation is that the survey respondents may not represent the entire cross-section of family-owned business in the United States. Additionally, the impact of company size, age, industry, and other demographic factors were not considered in the analysis of results. Finally, the selection of the key determinants was made based upon the highest value extracted from the principle components analysis. Combining these variables with other relatively high values may lead to different results.

Originality/value

The empirical findings contained in this study demonstrate that process, context, and governance factors have the largest effect on increasing the probability that intra-family succession does not take place. Additionally, the results of this study suggest several managerial actions that can be taken to improve the probability of intra-family business succession. Thus, the results of this study can be used by practitioners to assist them in intra-family business successions. The results can also be used by researchers as a basis for conducting additional empirical studies in this area.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Manon Deslandes, Anne Fortin and Suzanne Landry

The objective of this study is to explain family firm payout decisions based on socioemotional wealth (SEW) considerations.

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to explain family firm payout decisions based on socioemotional wealth (SEW) considerations.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of publicly listed Canadian companies is examined for the period from 2003 to 2008. Distinguishing family firms from nonfamily firms, a Probit regression is used to analyze the likelihood of making a payout. For payout firms, regressions are used to analyze the relationship between payout level (dividends and share repurchases) and payout mix and family firms.

Findings

Results indicate that family firms are more likely to make a payout than nonfamily firms. Among payout firms, the level of payout among payout firms is lower for family firms than for nonfamily firms and their portion of payout in the form of dividends is higher. Lone founder family firms have a lower likelihood of making payouts than other family firms. However, among payout firms, they pay out more than other family firms and have a smaller percentage of their total payout in dividends than other family firms.

Research limitations/implications

Results are impacted by the definition of what constitutes a family firm. Family ownership was used as a proxy for the underlying SEW considerations. Future research could involve interviews with family firm representatives to investigate the relative importance of SEW considerations in their payout decisions.

Originality/value

In providing an alternative theoretical framing of family firms’ payout policies, the study suggests that payout differences between family and nonfamily firms may be driven in part by SEW considerations.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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