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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2017

Lori Weeks, Stephanie Chamberlain and Janice Keefe

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of homelikeness from the perspective of family members and friends of nursing home residents across different models of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of homelikeness from the perspective of family members and friends of nursing home residents across different models of nursing homes.

Design/methodology/approach

This mixed-methods study examined survey data collected from 397 family members and friends of residents living in 23 nursing homes representing three models of care (traditional, new augmented, and full scope). Participants completed a homelikeness scale and a measure of the importance of nursing home spaces to family members and friends. This study also involved conducting three focus groups with 20 family members and friends to provide further insights into the findings.

Findings

Analysis of survey data indicated quite high levels of homelikeness overall. Significant differences did emerge between traditional model nursing homes compared to new full-scope and new augmented models for all items in the homelikeness scale and for many items about nursing home spaces. Qualitative results provided insights into how homelikeness can be fostered through public and private spaces and through care and relationships.

Research limitations/implications

As this study was conducted in one Canadian province, the results may not be applicable to other geographic areas. In addition, there are limitations in survey response rate.

Practical implications

Homelikeness can be supported across models of care by fostering relationships between residents and staff, ensuring that that family and friends feel welcome, and creating public and private physical spaces that are conducive to new and ongoing relationships.

Originality/value

The results provide evidence to nursing home decision makers about how to foster a homelike environment in various models of nursing homes.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Lori Weeks

This research examined how moving to a residential care home, a specific form of long‐term care facility, influences the quality of the relationship between seniors and…

Abstract

This research examined how moving to a residential care home, a specific form of long‐term care facility, influences the quality of the relationship between seniors and their family members and how policies in these homes can facilitate relationships between residents and their family members. In this exploratory study, a total of five non‐spousal family members participated in a focus group discussion, and an additional 10 family members participated in face‐to‐face interviews. The two main themes that emerged identified that admission to a long‐term care facility had no influence on family relationships, or it had a positive influence on family relationships. The respondents identified how policies in the home can maintain or enhance family relationships. In particular, they appreciated very flexible policies that included few restrictions on when and where they could interact with their relatives and appreciated facilities providing private spaces to accommodate family interaction. The results of this study, and future research, will aid administrators in long‐term care facilities to develop policies that most support and enhance the experience of seniors and their ongoing relationship with their family members.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Lori Weeks and Karen Roberto

Although older women are at disproportionate risk of falling and becoming injured, little is known about the effect of falling on their quality of life. In this…

Abstract

Although older women are at disproportionate risk of falling and becoming injured, little is known about the effect of falling on their quality of life. In this qualitative study, we examined the perceived causes of falling among older women, identified how older women's quality of life is influenced by falls, and explored how women can be empowered to prevent falls from occurring in their lives. Women who participated in focus groups indicated that the consequences of falling ranged in severity and duration and encompassed physical and psychosocial domains. The women took some ownership of preventing falls in their lives and believed that falls were caused by factors in the physical environment and personal health factors and practices. The results allow us to gain insight into the consequences of falls on the lives of older women, and that older women can influence change by preventing falls from occurring in their lives.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Lori Weeks, Olive Branton and Thomy Nilsson

We addressed how family factors influenced the future housing preferences of seniors. A total of 100 adults ranging in age from 65 to 98 participated in face‐to‐face…

Abstract

We addressed how family factors influenced the future housing preferences of seniors. A total of 100 adults ranging in age from 65 to 98 participated in face‐to‐face interviews. The vast majority of the respondents had no plans to move, and most wanted to remain living in close proximity to family. The results showed several linkages between family support currently provided and the future housing preferences of seniors. The results of this study have implications for developing programmes and services to support seniors and their family members to accommodate ageing in place. Further research is needed to understand more completely how family factors influence seniors' housing preferences.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Ron Iphofen

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Ron Iphofen

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2021

John T. Fleming and Lauren Lawley Head

Abstract

Details

Ultimate Gig
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-860-7

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Danielle Barbe, Lori Pennington-Gray and Ashley Schroeder

The purpose of this paper is to understand the online communication strategies used by destination management organizations (DMOs) during a terrorist attack. In…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the online communication strategies used by destination management organizations (DMOs) during a terrorist attack. In particular, this study analyzes Twitter use during seven terrorism incidents in six European cities (Paris, Brussels, Nice, Berlin, London and Barcelona) between 2015 and 2017.

Design/methodology/approach

Twitter content was collected via NCapture, a web browser extension of NVivo, one week prior to the attacks, the day of, and two weeks following to determine the timeframe in which DMOs communicated about the crisis, the types of messages being communicated, and whether these messages are effective. This study uses Coombs’ Situational Crisis Communication Theory as a guide to analyzing the effectiveness of the crisis communication strategies.

Findings

The findings of this paper indicate that DMOs are not effectively using Twitter during a terrorist attack. Few tweets relating to the attacks provided tourists with information regarding their safety, with the remaining only communicating as victims. Many DMOs went offline in the days immediately following the attacks and each DMO’s crisis communication on Twitter only lasted up to one week following the attacks.

Originality/value

This study provides insight into the ways DMOs are using social media for crisis communication. These results inform DMOs on their responsibility in communicating information during a terrorist attack. Messages of support are useful in the recovery stage, but tourists need information on how to stay safe and Twitter is often the first source people go to for information (Simon et al., 2014).

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2022

Lori Czop Assaf, Kristie O'Donnell Lussier and Meagan Hoff

To deconstruct colonizing ideologies and expand our understanding of global meaning making (Tierney, 2018) in this chapter, we describe a qualitative study that explored…

Abstract

To deconstruct colonizing ideologies and expand our understanding of global meaning making (Tierney, 2018) in this chapter, we describe a qualitative study that explored how a cohort of teacher candidates (TCs) from a large Southwestern university in the United States made sense of a community mapping project as part of their international service-learning program in rural South Africa. The TCs observed, collected, and reflected on various literacy activities and artifacts. Findings suggest that the TCs grappled with colonizing perspectives and practices specifically related to language, literacy, and cultural hegemony. They identified and struggled with the power and privilege they noticed bolstering Western literacies and the English language in the local community to the extent that it overshadowed local languages and local cultural norms. They questioned the historically situated use of certain spellings in local texts and how such spellings are connected to Apartheid policies still influencing this rural community. By engaging in the community mapping project, the TCs also recognized that literacy is socially informed and is more than just reading and writing but employs a range of semiotic tools such as images, movement, and music. The transformative process of participating in the community mapping project helped TCs develop a deeper understanding of the relationships between community and school literacies and grapple with the broader impact of Western epistemologies in the Global South.

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Tsovinar Harutyunyan, Anahit Demirchyan, Michael Thompson and Varduhi Petrosyan

The purpose of this study is to focus on the performance of select facilities in Lori and Shirak provinces in Armenia in Spring 2008. This is in response to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to focus on the performance of select facilities in Lori and Shirak provinces in Armenia in Spring 2008. This is in response to the deterioration of the primary healthcare sector in Armenia.

Design/methodology/approach

The performance assessment focused on the status of several performance indicators, both current and as recalled for 2006. The interviewer‐administered questionnaire addressed access to care, provider relations with community and clients, environment, management, and primary and secondary prevention at the facilities. For each domain, a summative score that ranged from 0 to 3 was computed and a mean score for each facility derived.

Findings

The project has had significant positive impact on facilities' performance. Access to care scores increased from 2.0 in 2006 to 2.5 in 2008; provider relations with community improved from 1.1 to 1.4; environment scores improved from 1.3 to 1.9, facility management improved from 1.4 to 1.7; and prevention efforts increased from 1.3 to 1.9. The overall mean facility score increased from 1.4 to 1.8. Although the scores for small rural clinics increased, their scores were lower than the scores for other facility types.

Originality/value

In the chronic absence of administrative surveillance data, this paper provides valuable information on the status of primary healthcare services in Armenian provinces. It demonstrates the value of interviewer‐administered performance assessments in obtaining data across project sites when internal monitoring of progress is unavailable.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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