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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

Mohd Rafi Yaacob and Loong Wong

This paper aims to problematise the notions of both “corporate social responsibility” and “stakeholder theory”. In particular, it seeks to challenge the promises it claims…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to problematise the notions of both “corporate social responsibility” and “stakeholder theory”. In particular, it seeks to challenge the promises it claims to hold regarding social responsibility and community engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a discussion of indigenous stakeholders’ activism in Sarawak, Malaysia.

Findings

It is shown that despite the rhetoric of corporate social responsibility and stakeholderism, there is a clear failure of the state government and corporations to actively involve local affected communities. In so doing, both the state and corporations have rendered the local indigenous peoples, a significant and legitimate stakeholder, powerless, redundant and inevitably compromised both the development and management process. The paper also suggests that community engagement can be problematic for indigenous peoples and for it and stakeholderism to be efficacious, they need to involve the discourse of rights and activism within Sarawak and Malaysia.

Originality/value

The paper offers insight into the indigenous peoples at Sarawak resistance against the state Government and corporations, Focusing on stakeholder activism.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2011

Loong Wong and Henriett Primecz

This paper seeks to explore the migration dynamics that have characterized Chinese immigration in Budapest and the migrants' understanding of their own position in…

1423

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore the migration dynamics that have characterized Chinese immigration in Budapest and the migrants' understanding of their own position in relation to the Chinese diaspora. The paper also aims to discuss the interaction of the local economy and resources of the Chinese migrants to form viable network communities.

Design/methodology/approach

The ideas of market embeddedness and the critical role of market opportunities are critically evaluated in the context of local practices. The paper seeks to show that the “new” entrepreneur is an active and creative social actor able to utilize, mobilize and control resources in different countries to achieve business opportunities and growth for him/herself.

Findings

It is shown that globalization has spawned “new” transnational spaces and enabled migrant Chinese entrepreneurs to thrive and grow their businesses. This is a new trend and clearly suggests that a qualitatively different migration trajectory is evolving; and theoretically, analysts of globalization and entrepreneurial development have to better account for the different trajectories of entrepreneurial forms.

Originality/value

The paper suggests that this “new” migrant entrepreneurship trend is qualitatively different and marks a “new” development and it is a consequence of economic globalization and the transnationalization of business and economic activities.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2008

Loong Wong

Although researchers and multilateral agencies recognize that no single model of corporate governance exists, this has not stopped the push for a one best corporate…

Abstract

Although researchers and multilateral agencies recognize that no single model of corporate governance exists, this has not stopped the push for a one best corporate governance model. Research recognized institutional factors, including culture, affects the nature of corporate ownership structure and consequently on disclosure, transparency and enforcement practices. Drawing on East Asian examples, the chapter argues that a focus on ‘market’ principles alone fails to account for the contextual effects of Asian political, historical and institutional forms which moderate corporate governance systems and practices. This chapter suggests that there is the need to consider the extant effects of ‘culture’ on corporate governance.

Details

Institutional Approach to Global Corporate Governance: Business Systems and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-320-0

Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2009

Loong Wong

Financial markets have become a central aspect of our daily lives. This is due to the liberalization of global capital markets during the last two decades. This has led to…

Abstract

Financial markets have become a central aspect of our daily lives. This is due to the liberalization of global capital markets during the last two decades. This has led to increased liquidity and enhanced volatility within the financial system as the amounts traded daily, monthly, annually are sometimes larger than total global GDP. This has affected our daily lives profoundly and indeed, as the current global financial crisis, leaves no country untouched. In examining the present financial crisis, the paper argues that we have enough regulations and systems but we do not have effective regulative practices to enable compliance, control, and oversight. Indeed, the regulatory response to current developments in the financial sector has been both slow and inadequate. The paper starts by providing a context and the evolution of the “new” financial system and its attendant practices. The paper argues that the crisis could have been averted had there been a proper and effective governance mechanism and appropriate instruments employed to effect such compliance. Such mechanisms and instruments would also need to critically interrogate the epistemological foundations of accepted practices and wisdom. The paper suggests that the present crisis provides a circuit broker for a radical rethink of the present financial system and practices.

Details

Credit, Currency, or Derivatives: Instruments of Global Financial Stability Or crisis?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-601-4

Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2005

Loong Wong

Recent spectacular collapses globally have sparked renewed public interest in corporate governance and the pursuit of a new global model. The prevailing dominance of an…

Abstract

Recent spectacular collapses globally have sparked renewed public interest in corporate governance and the pursuit of a new global model. The prevailing dominance of an American model has overshadowed constructive attempts to derive a model that is more appropriate for ‘non-western’ and developing countries. In this paper, I examine the discourse of corporate governance in China. I argue that rather than being a mere captive of the American model, it could have crafted and developed an alternate and more appropriate model that takes into account the economic and social needs of China instead of a corporate governance model developed for other countries.

Details

Corporate Governance: Does Any Size Fit?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-342-6

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Loong Wong

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of education, in particular, the Master of Business Administration (MBA), on China's continual development and economic…

1193

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of education, in particular, the Master of Business Administration (MBA), on China's continual development and economic growth. This paper concerns itself with the “software” necessary to effect a qualitative transformation – education. MBA education's growth in China is reflective of the significant shortages of managerial expertise, but the MBA's roots in and transfer to China does not necessarily make it an agent of economic transformation and modernisation. This paper suggests that the MBA education's conceptual base and preoccupation, as well as Chinese managerial practices, may render management in China more rational and even, more efficient, but not necessarily more creative.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a critique of MBA education and the critical role played by communities in fostering creativity in building its claims, and presents an overview based on analysis of research materials.

Findings

This paper stresses the importance of keeping up with creativity and the emerging new global paradigms of the business environment. Managing and developing for “creativity” has become an important strategic instrument for firms and states to improve their competitiveness and create wealth. The paper examines the impact of education, in particular, the MBA on China's continual development and economic growth and argues that there is a preoccupation with techniques and assumes that creativity can be uni‐linearly transferred. The paper further points out that a “creative” economy and society needs appropriate infrastructures, strategies and mechanisms. Educational institutions offering business education need to be mindful of the limitations of their educational models and practices. Similarly, the Chinese need to be more reflective in their engagements with MBA education.

Practical implications

Critical areas are suggested that decision makers in government agencies, enterprises and international funding agencies need to address with respect if they are to effect “creativity” in China. Understanding that “creativity” is not one‐dimensional and uni‐linear will assist in enabling new possibilities and avenues of knowledge to be opened up and also in the development and nurturing of new institutions and practices necessary for creating a more dynamic and creative economy and society.

Originality/value

This paper critically assesses the transfer of “software” mechanisms into China which seek to transform its economy, and provides some observations and insights on creativity and its implications for China.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Loong Wong

This paper aims to examine the current financial crisis, suggesting that most analyses have attributed the crisis to a lack of business ethics, the rise of greed and lax…

3748

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the current financial crisis, suggesting that most analyses have attributed the crisis to a lack of business ethics, the rise of greed and lax regulation. Prescriptions offered to address this crisis draw accordingly on the need for greater regulation of market behaviour, business practices and boardroom pay. Whilst these reforms are necessary, they fail to recognise that such business practices have their roots in an extreme political and economic ideology – neoliberal market fundamentalism. This paper seeks to suggests that a greater appreciation of the nexus between politics, philosophy and economics is critical in order to develop a different practice. As such, the author provides a socio‐historical and political context for understanding the present crisis before offering a critique and reform of the business educational agenda. The author argues that such a context would engender greater understanding of business practices and systems for both students and practitioners and would go some way in enabling them to fashion a more critical reflexive and engaged practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a critical‐historical review of the literature on the crisis. In so doing, the paper opens up the analysis to philosophical and political approaches to understanding financial crises.

Findings

The paper finds that explanations for the crisis can be found through a critical appreciation of philosophical and political texts. This finding also suggests that current business and management education and practices can benefit from an incorporation of these historical strands of thought.

Research limitations/implications

In drawing on various strands in philosophy, politics, economics and sociology, the paper finds that a singular account for the crisis is flawed. The paper also finds that a richer and deeper appreciation of the crisis can be found through a critical‐historical positioning of the crisis. This necessitates an understanding of politics and philosophy in business practices and education.

Practical implications

In explaining the crisis, the paper suggests that many of the current financial “innovations” are problematic and a more critical approach is needed to engage with these “new” innovations.

Originality/value

The paper seeks to open up new vistas for business education and practices. Through a critical‐historical interrogation of the crisis, the paper opens up new spaces for understanding international economics and business practices. This reflexivity is often missing in international business studies and most management practices.

Details

Critical perspectives on international business, vol. 5 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Loong Wong

This paper seeks to examine the activities and consequential effects of a transnational corporation in a developing country. Via an examination of the industrial accident…

3447

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the activities and consequential effects of a transnational corporation in a developing country. Via an examination of the industrial accident in Bhopal and a discursive examination of the firm's strategies, the paper seeks to contest the firm's claims that it has been acting responsibly. The paper further suggests that the contexts and development of the relationships, and claims by Union Carbide and its supporters, and its place within the global economy, must be critically examined and subjected to a systemic analysis if corporate social responsibility is to have any significant resonance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper seeks to integrate a wide range of epidemiological and social science literature relating to Bhopal. It seeks to examine Bhopal within the context of power discourse and the relationships engendered via its manifestations and practices. This discursive approach enables the researcher to disentangle various strands of practice within the context of the transnational firm and local communities

Findings

The paper finds that a more systemic approach to corporate governance and corporate social responsibility (CSR) is necessary, if developing countries and local communities are to be treated as critical in the development process and as stakeholders in the debate on CSR.

Originality/value

By its examination if this case, the paper emphasises the need for a more systemic approach to corporate governance and CSR.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Theatre
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-336-9

Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2005

Kala Saravanamuthu

The papers compiled in this special issue have been presented at the conference on “Corporate Governance and Ethics: Beyond Contemporary Perspectives” that has been held…

Abstract

The papers compiled in this special issue have been presented at the conference on “Corporate Governance and Ethics: Beyond Contemporary Perspectives” that has been held in June 2004 in Sydney, Australia.1 The conference has brought together the three disciplines that impact on governance issues: accounting, management, and law. This issue reflects this interdisciplinary approach to the subject matter.

Details

Corporate Governance: Does Any Size Fit?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-342-6

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