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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Helen S. Du, Xiaobo Ke, Samuel K.W. Chu and Lok Ting Chan

The purpose of this paper is to present a statistical analysis of research into emergency management (EM) using information systems (IS) for the period 2000-2016.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a statistical analysis of research into emergency management (EM) using information systems (IS) for the period 2000-2016.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, research trends in the area of EM using IS are analysed using various parameters, including trends on publications and citations, disciplinary distribution, journals, research institutions and regional cooperation. Through a keyword co-occurrence analysis, this study identifies the evolution of the main keywords in this area, and examines the changes and developments in the main focus of scholars in this period. The study also explores the main research orientations in the field by analysing and integrating the results of two cluster analyses conducted from keyword- and reference-based perspectives, respectively.

Findings

The area of EM using IS has received increased attention and interest by researchers and practitioners. It is suggested that more cooperation among research institutions is required to help facilitate the further development of the area. Six main research orientations are identified: namely Web 2.0-enabled research, geographic information technology (IT), IT-based research, the contextual use of IT, crisis collaboration research and mass media communication research, since the research area first became popular in 2006.

Originality/value

This study is the first to comprehensively map the landscape of EM by conducting a bibliometric analysis of the research using IS. The authors’ findings can help academics and emergency managers gain a comprehensive understanding of the research area, and guide scholars towards producing more effective findings.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2019

Kenneth Ka Lok Chan

To fill the gap in the existing literature on the 20th anniversary of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR), the purpose of this paper is to critically…

Abstract

Purpose

To fill the gap in the existing literature on the 20th anniversary of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR), the purpose of this paper is to critically reflect upon the continuities and changes of the city’s relations with the world.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper has adopted a generic approach to shed light on the factors behind the evolution of the international status of Hong Kong from a by-product of geopolitics to a global city in its own right, to understand how the city has been perceived by traditional western partners after 1997 and to investigate how China has made use Hong Kong’s international status.

Findings

It has shown that Beijing’s strategy toward Hong Kong has been marred by the inherent tensions between “becoming Chinese” and “remaining global.” The official discourse of functionalism, according to which economic and professional ties are both the most acceptable and therefore the least resisted pathways available for the development of Hong Kong’s external relations, has the opposite effect of expanding Beijing’s control over the city.

Originality/value

In contrast to the HKSAR Government’s belief that Hong Kong will certainly benefit from the emergence of China, the city has found itself on a shorter leash than ever. It has therefore pinpointed the pitfalls of the logic of functionalism which has dominated the existing literature as much as the policy-making process.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Joseph Lok-Man Lee, Noel Yee-Man Siu and Tracy Jun-Feng Zhang

Can we always expect that service recovery justice leads to satisfaction? Literature has shown that a number of moderating factors impact the recovery justice-satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

Can we always expect that service recovery justice leads to satisfaction? Literature has shown that a number of moderating factors impact the recovery justice-satisfaction link in different cultures. However, there is a dearth of research that has indicated the key cultural variables that play a moderating role. This study aims to attempt to fill the research gap by investigating the moderating role of concern for face, belief in fate and brand equity in the relationship between perceived justice and satisfaction in Chinese culture during service recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypothesized relationships are tested using data from interviews with 600 persons who have recently complained about their telecommunications services. Structural equation modeling is applied in analyzing their responses.

Findings

Concern for face is found to strengthen the relationship between interactional justice perceptions and satisfaction, but to weaken the relationship between distributive justice perceptions and satisfaction. Belief in fate weakens the link between perceptions of interactional justice and satisfaction. Brand equity positively moderates the relationship between perceptions of interactional justice and satisfaction, but it negatively moderates the relationship between perceptions of distributive justice and satisfaction.

Practical implications

The cultural variables, namely, face, fate and brand equity, are found to serve as a moderating role in the relationship between recovery justice dimensions and satisfaction. They are more salient when it is related to social element. Face and brand equity, as interpersonal constructs, aggravate the impact of interactional justice on satisfaction. Fate, as non-social factor, weakens the impact of interactional justice on satisfaction. It is argued that managers should provide staff training in product knowledge and customer service as a preventive measure against damage to the brand. Regular customer satisfaction research and benchmarking exercises should be conducted to understand how customers perceive interactional justice.

Originality/value

This has been the first research to examine the impact of concern for face, belief in fate and brand equity in the relationship between justice perceptions and post-recovery satisfaction during service recovery.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2020

Rosalinda Lok Ting Suen, Dickson K.W. Chiu and Jeff K.T. Tang

Virtual Reality (VR) has become a popular topic recently, and the quality of immersive experience nowadays is beyond our imagination. While VR applications for…

Abstract

Purpose

Virtual Reality (VR) has become a popular topic recently, and the quality of immersive experience nowadays is beyond our imagination. While VR applications for entertainment are common, it is a new and popular trend in academic libraries. Although many academic libraries in the West have started to provide VR services to catch up with the trend, the deployment is not quite popular in the East. This research aims to identify the reasons behind such phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

This research explores this phenomenon by studying two selected cases through interviews, site visits, and website/document analysis: the CAVE of the City University of Hong Kong Library and the VR Experience Zone of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University Library.

Findings

The findings indicated that VR library services are well-received and meeting user needs. However, the major limitations of using VR in academic libraries are technical capability, space and budget, causing libraries to hesitate in introducing and developing VR services.

Originality/value

Scant studies focus on the development, management and user feedback of VR services in academic libraries, especially in the East. Based on the findings, possible solutions for academic libraries interested in taking part in this trend are suggested.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2019

Chi Keung Charles Fung and Chi Shun Fong

Many scholars would agree that the international status of Hong Kong is one of the crucial factors that contribute to the continued success of Hong Kong. However, few of…

Abstract

Purpose

Many scholars would agree that the international status of Hong Kong is one of the crucial factors that contribute to the continued success of Hong Kong. However, few of them explain the origin of Hong Kong’s international status. The purpose of this paper is to fill this literature gap through the case study of Hong Kong’s admission to an international organization – the Asian Development Bank (ADB) – in the late 1960s.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on declassified archives, a historical approach has been adopted to trace the origin of Hong Kong’s international status.

Findings

The findings suggest that Cold War geopolitics, both local and regional level, explain why Hong Kong, even though remained as a dependent territory of Britain, became a member of an international organization independent from the British influence. While geopolitics at local level incentivized the colonial government to “go out” for external support, geopolitics at the regional level provided an opportunity for Hong Kong to acquire membership of the ADB.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first academic study on the origin of Hong Kong’s international status.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1973

‘MOST people should by now accept the need to take account of people as well as machines in the design and organization of work. Yet this need is in fact overlooked under…

Abstract

‘MOST people should by now accept the need to take account of people as well as machines in the design and organization of work. Yet this need is in fact overlooked under the pressure of more immediate problems.’ These words are used by the Secretary of State for Employment to introduce an important report prepared for the Department and just issued by HMSO.

Details

Work Study, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Liisa Mäkelä

Women are, in increasing numbers, participating in the labour market and are an important part of an organisation’s human resource pool. Nevertheless, women still face…

1040

Abstract

Women are, in increasing numbers, participating in the labour market and are an important part of an organisation’s human resource pool. Nevertheless, women still face inappropriate treatment at work. One cause of this is family‐related issues. In particular, pregnancy and child birth present special challenges for working women. Discrimination towards pregnant women is commonplace in work settings. Problems are often related to individual work relationships, for example, the one between the pregnant follower and her manager. It is important to understand problems that impact on women in working life that can disturb their job satisfaction, their performance and willingness to give their best for the organisation. Therefore, for the benefit of both employer and employee, existing practices in leader follower relationships during pregnancy are worth studying in more depth. In leadership studies, the Leader‐Member Exchange (LMX) theory is focused on dyadic leader‐follower relationships and is thus used here to understand this phenomenon. In the present article, the literature on pregnancy and work as well as on LMX is re viewed. On the basis of these reviews, a future research agenda is offered.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 24 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2019

Wai Yin Chan

The purpose of this paper is to map out the connection between paradiplomacy, policy instruments and soft power and propose a theoretical framework for consideration.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to map out the connection between paradiplomacy, policy instruments and soft power and propose a theoretical framework for consideration.

Design/methodology/approach

This research adopted a qualitative research approach involving in-depth interviews with government officials from the Hong Kong Economic and Trade Offices and two Hong Kong film directors.

Findings

The research has discovered that the government of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) lacks a holistic strategy and policy to boost Hong Kong’s visibility in the global context. The HKSAR Government exhibits an incomplete understanding of the concept of soft power and ignores the values cherished in the civil society.

Practical implications

This investigation provides a background against which Hong Kong’s policymakers could devise a paradiplomatic strategy. This study suggests that political and social actors in Hong Kong must help to strengthen the city’s global position through strategic investments and the deployment of its soft power at home and aboard. The paradiplomacy of Hong Kong can serve as one of the effective tools to improve the legitimacy of “One Country, Two Systems.”

Originality/value

There is no study on the application of soft power under the framework of paradiplomacy. This paper represents a new direction of research in the area of Hong Kong, international status and its external affairs.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Wayne H. Decker, Thomas J. Calo, Hong Yao and Christy H. Weer

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether Chinese and US students differ in preference for group work (PGW) and whether the factors contributing to PGW differ in…

1876

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether Chinese and US students differ in preference for group work (PGW) and whether the factors contributing to PGW differ in the two countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample included 412 Chinese and 423 US college students who completed a survey measuring cultural values and motives. Hierarchical regression and simple-slope analyses were used to examine main effects and interactions.

Findings

Overall, the US and Chinese students did not differ in PGW. Although US men exceeded US women in PGW, no gender difference occurred in China. PGW was positively associated with others focus (concern for what others think) and helping others in both countries, but the association was stronger in China. In China, but not in the USA, PGW was positively associated with extrinsic motivation and need for achievement. Therefore, despite the general acceptance of group work in the USA, participation in groups is not seen as critical in attaining rewards as it is in China.

Research limitations/implications

Other populations, including practicing managers, should be studied to better represent the workforce of each country. Also, other variables, including personality traits, may impact PGW.

Practical implications

Managers and educators should pay attention to how cultural values and motives of group members vary. Business education should offer more opportunities to increase exposure to cultural differences, including experience working in culturally diverse groups.

Originality/value

The study supports some traditional assumptions concerning the impact of culture upon PGW, but also suggests that a global business orientation can mitigate the impact of traditional national cultures.

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

Trudie Honour, Jim Barry and Sneha Palnitkar

Considers the implications of 30 per cent quota innovation for women politicians in Mumbai (formerly Bombay) and other area of India since the 1990’s. Uses a survey to…

Abstract

Considers the implications of 30 per cent quota innovation for women politicians in Mumbai (formerly Bombay) and other area of India since the 1990’s. Uses a survey to explore the influence of women on policy and compares this with some previous research in London. Suggest ways this representation may be sustained.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

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