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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Kristina Liljestrand

The purpose of this paper is to expand understandings of how logistics can reduce food waste in food supply chains (FSCs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand understandings of how logistics can reduce food waste in food supply chains (FSCs).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a research framework that associates causes of food waste with logistics solutions, a multiple-case study was conducted in three Swedish FSCs of meat, fruit and vegetables, and ambient products, respectively, and involving industrial producers, wholesalers, and retailers. Data were collected during 19 semistructured interviews and four site visits, and logistics solutions were analysed according to logistics activities, actors involved and their stages in the FSC, and coordination mechanisms.

Findings

A joint analysis of nine logistics solutions revealed that to efficiently reduce food waste in FSCs, solutions have been implemented at three stages of FSCs, as well as that those solutions differ in their integration of six logistics activities and four coordination mechanisms. The findings moreover indicate that the solutions are interlinked, thereby implying that coordination is necessary both within solutions as well as among them.

Research limitations/implications

The chief limitation is that the potential of the identified logistics solutions is not quantified.

Practical implications

The paper makes recommendations for reducing food waste in FSCs by developing new solutions and modifying existing ones.

Social implications

The paper suggests ways to reduce significant environmental impacts of food waste.

Originality/value

By building upon previous research explaining causes of food waste, this paper focusses on logistics solutions for reducing such waste.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Maria Giuffrida, Riccardo Mangiaracina, Alessandro Perego and Angela Tumino

The purpose of this paper is to support companies’ risk-informed selection of a logistics solution to operate in China via cross-border e-commerce (CBEC).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to support companies’ risk-informed selection of a logistics solution to operate in China via cross-border e-commerce (CBEC).

Design/methodology/approach

Decision theory is applied to the recent field of CBEC. This theoretic setup involves a decision maker who must choose among a set of alternatives, whose consequences depend on uncertain factors (Savage, 1954). The study develops an activity-based model to calculate logistics costs in a deterministic setting. Simulations and probabilistic sensitivity analyses are later performed to evaluate the impact of uncertainty.

Findings

There are four main solutions to enter China, determined by the adopted international transport mean and the presence of a local warehouse. The most important risk factors affecting the choice of the logistics solution are change of CBEC regulation, product value, expected service level and demand level.

Originality/value

From a theoretical perspective, this study improves CBEC literature, so far characterised by descriptive papers, often lacking industry focus or empirical exploration. It also provides new application opportunities for decision theory, whereas previous contributions have proposed different theoretical approaches, such as transaction cost or institutional theory. From a practical viewpoint, the paper is the first to compare the costs of the main logistics solutions to sell online to China, by taking uncertainty into account. The results can be used to better understand the differences among solutions and identify the most critical parameters. Finally, this research provides some observations for policy implementation.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Guillem Sanz, Rafael Pastor and Bruno Domenech

City logistics is a challenge in many cities. Literature works focus on the analysis of large or local-scale solutions to increase the efficiency of freight transport…

Abstract

Purpose

City logistics is a challenge in many cities. Literature works focus on the analysis of large or local-scale solutions to increase the efficiency of freight transport. However, store deliveries from the perspective of practitioners, particularly retail stores, are still an issue. In this context, the purpose of this paper is to propose a decision framework to assist logistics managers in defining efficient re-shelving solutions for store deliveries, according to the emplacement characteristics, city administration constraints and social issues.

Design/methodology/approach

An iterative step-by-step decision framework is developed, which allows taking decisions in a clear and structured way, including the preferences of key stakeholders. Moreover, a “what if” procedure is proposed, aiming to modify some initial conditions of the target store to achieve more efficient solutions.

Findings

The proposed decision framework is applicable in practice and helps users (mainly logistics managers) to identify solutions for efficient re-shelving in urban settings.

Research limitations/implications

The decision framework is applied by the logistics manager of two Spanish food retail stores, but it could be used in different logistics sectors and cities/regions, although adapting the decisions taken at each phase.

Practical implications

Logistics managers have a support tool when addressing re-shelving solutions for store deliveries.

Social implications

A balance can be found between company interests (minimise costs) and citizens quality of life (less contamination, noise, traffic, etc.).

Originality/value

This study simultaneously deals with large- and local-scale decisions faced by logistics managers in their day-to-day activity, considering details about the store location, its surroundings and the company it belongs.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 48 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Kari Tanskanen, Jan Holmström, Jan Elfving and Ulla Talvitie

The purpose of this paper is to describe the challenge of managing logistics at corporate level in construction industry; and to present and evaluate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the challenge of managing logistics at corporate level in construction industry; and to present and evaluate vendor‐managed‐inventory (VMI) as a potential solution for small item logistics.

Design/methodology/approach

The study has a design science approach. It describes and tests a possible solution design for small item logistics in construction.

Findings

The paper finds that VMI is an efficient solution for small item logistics at construction sites, provided that it is well designed and movable. When the construction company owns the solution, it can more potentially be a corporate‐wide solution.

Research limitations/implications

The VMI solution is tested at only three pilot sites, so there might be many situational factors affecting its feasibility that could not be observed.

Practical implications

The proposed solution is potentially a major step in moving from site‐by‐site logistics towards corporate level logistics management in construction industry.

Originality/value

The VMI solution presented in this paper is unique for construction industry. The study indicates that it improves significantly the effectiveness of small item logistics in construction. More generally, the value of the paper is in combining horizontal integration (across sites) and vertical integration (supply chain) views in designing logistics solutions for construction industry.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 58 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2020

B. Puente-Mejia, C. Orellana-Rojas and C. Suárez-Núñez

With the increasing urbanization rates in emerging countries such as the ones in Latin America and the Caribbean, urban logistics solutions and initiatives are widely…

Abstract

With the increasing urbanization rates in emerging countries such as the ones in Latin America and the Caribbean, urban logistics solutions and initiatives are widely needed. Urban planners often consider only passenger transportation and leave freight transportation unattended, thus increasing externalities and degrading the transportation of goods. This chapter presents three urban logistics solutions, which intend to tackle problems related to urbanization and last mile delivery operations challenges by evaluating location models for loading and unloading bays, urban transfer centers location models, and freight trip generation models. The presented solutions were proposed by several researchers of the Institute of Innovation in Productivity and Logistics CATENA-USFQ over the last four years and remain theoretical at the moment. However, we present estimated results of potential implementations in three districts of Quito: Historic Center, Entertainment District, and Corporate District. This chapter not only presents the mentioned urban logistics solutions in Quito but also gives an overview of the followed methodology, which can be replicated in countries and cities of similar characteristics of the region.

Details

Supply Chain Management and Logistics in Emerging Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-333-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1998

Mauro Caputo and Valeria Mininno

This work presents the results of the survey “Organisational structures and logistics in the branded product history of the grocery section in Italy” developed with the…

Abstract

This work presents the results of the survey “Organisational structures and logistics in the branded product history of the grocery section in Italy” developed with the aim of pointing out the organisational structures for the logistics co‐ordination of successful firms. Starting from a review of the literature on the main logistics organisation theories, this paper presents an organisational analysis of 118 industrial firms, working in Italy in the grocery sector, carried out for the main logistics activities. On the basis of this anlaysis, a classifying model of the organisational configurations presently adopted in Italy for internal integration is proposed. According to the model, six different organisational solutions have been singled out: integrated logistics, partially integrated logistics, bipartite logistics, distribution logistics, manufacturing logistics, and split logistics.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Alexandra Lagorio, Roberto Pinto and Ruggero Golini

The last decades have witnessed an increased interest in urban logistics originating from both the research and the practitioners’ communities. Sustainable freight…

Abstract

Purpose

The last decades have witnessed an increased interest in urban logistics originating from both the research and the practitioners’ communities. Sustainable freight transports today are on the political, social and technological agenda of many actors operating in urban contexts. Due to the extent of the covered areas and the continuous progress in many fields, the resulting body of research on urban logistics appears quite fragmented. From an engineering management perspective, the purpose of this paper is to present a systematic literature review (SLR) that aims to consolidate the knowledge on urban logistics, analyse the development of the discipline, and provide future research directions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the main evidence emerging from a SLR on urban logistics. The corpus resulting from the SLR has been used to perform a citation network analysis and a main path analysis that together underpin the identification of the most investigated topics and methodologies in the field.

Findings

Through the analysis of a corpus of 104 articles, the most important research contributions on urban logistics that represent the structural backbone in the development of the research over time in the field are detected. Based on these findings, this work identifies and discusses three areas of potential interest for future research.

Originality/value

This paper presents an SLR related to a research area in which the literature is extremely fragmented. The results provide insights about the research path, current trends and future research directions in the field of urban logistics.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 46 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2014

Hans Quak and Nina Nesterova

Electric freight vehicles (EFVs) are one of the solutions to improve city logistics’ sustainability. EFVs, that are electric powered light and heavy vehicles with a number…

Abstract

Purpose

Electric freight vehicles (EFVs) are one of the solutions to improve city logistics’ sustainability. EFVs, that are electric powered light and heavy vehicles with a number plate, have the potential to make zero emission city logistics possible within the urban area. However, although trials have been undertaken for the last years, large-scale usage of EFVs in city logistics does not occur yet. EFVs are technically possible, but the implementation of EFVs in practice is relatively limited.

Design

This chapter examines by reviewing current and past EFV implementations, what are the challenges, barriers and success factors for EFVs in city logistics operations. EFVs have especially positive environmental effects, but are overall usually more expensive (especially in procurement) than conventional vehicles. Besides, other technical and operational issues remain to be solved, and many uncertainties still exist on long-term usage.

Findings

Three main barriers for large-scale EFV uptake are identified. The current logistics concepts are developed for conventional vehicles and should be redesigned to fit EFVs better. Local authorities’ support is essential in order to find a positive (or not too negative) business case. And EFV implementation requires companies that want to be sustainable. This contribution presents examples of how some companies or authorities deal with these barriers.

Value

This chapter concludes by identifying elements that are necessary for acceleration of EFV uptake in city logistics operations.

Details

Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Árni Halldórsson and Tage Skjøtt‐Larsen

This paper considers third party logistics (TPL) from a resource and competence perspective. New competencies are developed in the relationship between the shipper and the…

Abstract

This paper considers third party logistics (TPL) from a resource and competence perspective. New competencies are developed in the relationship between the shipper and the TPL provider. A typology of TPL relationships is developed going from market exchanges to joint logistics solutions. Here, the article will concentrate on the highest level – joint logistics solutions. The theoretical grounding of competence development will be outlined. Two case examples will illustrate the learning process in TPL arrangements. Finally, the article will discuss managerial implications and implications for future research in TPL.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 March 2021

Laurence Saglietto

This study aims to review the literature on sharing economy logistics and crowd logistics to answer the three following questions: How is the literature on sharing economy…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to review the literature on sharing economy logistics and crowd logistics to answer the three following questions: How is the literature on sharing economy logistics structured? What are the main trends in sharing economy logistics and crowd logistics? What are the future research options?

Design/methodology/approach

Bibliometric analysis is used to evaluate 85 articles published over the past 12 years; it identifies the top academic journals, authors and research topics contributing to the field.

Findings

The sharing economy logistics and crowd logistics literature is structured around several disciplines and highlights that some are more scientifically advanced than others in their subject definitions, designs, modelling and innovative solutions. The main trends are organized around three clusters: Cluster 1 refers to the optimal allocation of costs, prices, distribution and supplier relationships; Cluster 2 corresponds to business related crowdsourcing and international industry practices; and Cluster 3 includes the impact of transport on last-mile delivery, crowd shipping and the environment.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on data from peer-reviewed scientific journals and conferences. A broader overview could include other data sources such as books, book chapters, working papers, etc.

Originality/value

Future research directions are discussed in the context of the evolution from crowd logistics to crowd intelligence, and the complexities of crowd logistics such as understanding how the social crowd can be integrated into the logistics process. Our results are part of the crowd science and engineering concept and provide some answers about crowd cyber-system questions regarding crowd intelligence in logistic sector.

Details

International Journal of Crowd Science, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-7294

Keywords

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