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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Alan C. McKinnon

In a previous paper (McKinnon, 2013), the author questioned the principle and practice of journal ranking and discussed its effects on logistics research. Since then…

Abstract

Purpose

In a previous paper (McKinnon, 2013), the author questioned the principle and practice of journal ranking and discussed its effects on logistics research. Since then several important developments have occurred prompting a fresh review of the issues. The paper summarises the results of this review with the aim of stimulating further discussion on the subject.

Design/methodology/approach

New literature on the journal ranking debate has been reviewed. The validity of the journal ranking as a proxy measure of paper quality is explored using data from the UK Research Excellence Framework (REF) assessment. Changes to the ranking of ten logistics/supply chain management (SCM) journals in four listings are analysed, and possible reasons for the relatively low status of the journals are examined.

Findings

The influence of journal rankings on the academic research process is strengthening while the debate about their legitimacy has intensified. UK REF data cast doubt on the reliability of the journal ranking as an indicator of a paper’s merit. Logistics/SCM journals continue to occupy mid-to-lower tier positions in most listings, though there has been some improvement in their standing.

Research limitations/implications

The paper aims to alert those managing and undertaking logistics research to the dangers of overreliance on journal rankings in the measurement of research quality and productivity.

Practical implications

The paper may help logistics/SCM scholars to defend the position of their discipline and resist journal-ranking-induced pressures to marginalise it and devalue its outputs.

Social implications

In this paper, academic recruitment, promotion and motivation are considered.

Originality/value

The paper sheds new light on the relationship between journal ranking and individual paper quality, on recent changes in the rating of logistics/SCM journals and on the wider debate about the use of bibliometrics in assessing research quality.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 47 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

David Eriksson

The purpose of this study is to convey lessons learned from a long-term research project and present a coherent approach for researching relevant areas, ranging from…

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1026

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to convey lessons learned from a long-term research project and present a coherent approach for researching relevant areas, ranging from ontology to quality.

Design/methodology/approach

A PhD process is used as a case to present conceptual ideas on performing research in logistics/supply chain management (SCM).

Findings

The research integrates different views on knowledge and the world and how to perform research in logistics/SCM. Models explaining micro and macro abduction, and the relationship between research, the context and researcher subjectivity are suggested.

Research limitations/implications

Knowledge on why and how critical realism can be used in logistics/SCM research is advanced. Abduction is presented as a micro/macro process, which should not have any specific “finish line”, and is supported with both ontological and epistemological arguments.

Practical implications

Research in logistics/SCM can be improved by connecting different aspects of viewing and creating knowledge. Reflecting on how exactly a publication is related to a project, researchers can better describe how they contribute to knowledge creation, and also understand the relationship between micro and macro abduction.

Originality/value

Through presenting an approach to knowledge creation in the context of a PhD thesis, this research distinguishes itself in a field with a growing need to define its own views of the world and of knowledge. The paper advances current understanding of knowledge creation in logistics/SCM, expanding on earlier models and presenting a broader view of the research process and the associated dilemmas. The paper also contains novel considerations of the differences between publication types and how these affect the presentation of the research.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2012

Michael S. Garver, Zachary Williams, G. Stephen Taylor and William R. Wynne

Much of the research conducted in logistics/SCM has focused on satisfaction/retention of customers. This has left a critical gap for managers: before customers can be…

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1956

Abstract

Purpose

Much of the research conducted in logistics/SCM has focused on satisfaction/retention of customers. This has left a critical gap for managers: before customers can be satisfied and ultimately retained, a purchase choice of logistics services has to occur. To date, very little research has addressed how logistics customers make purchase choice decisions about logistics services. The purpose of this paper, using logistics research methods, is to introduce adaptive choice modelling (ACM) to address this gap and put forth a research method that is useful for academic researchers and logistics/SCM managers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides an overview of ACM, along with a discussion of its important research advantages, limitations, and practical applications. Additionally, an empirical demonstration of this research technique is provided to illustrate how academic researchers and logistics managers can use ACM to better understand the decision‐making process of customers when selecting logistics services.

Findings

In order to demonstrate this research technique, a research project was designed and implemented that analyzed the choice process of consumers selecting parcel carriers to ship a textbook. The results show that price, speed of delivery, and tracking are the three most important variables in the selection decision. The results also show that consumers are not homogeneous, but can be divided into five distinct need‐based segments. Recognizing and understanding the nature of these segments should help managers better meet the needs of parcel shippers.

Research limitations/implications

The main research limitation with this study is that it is based on a convenience sample; thus future research will need to replicate this study to confirm the research findings. However, the ultimate purpose of the study is to present a new research method and discuss how to apply this method, so that logistics/SCM practitioners and academic researchers can better understand customers of logistics/SCM services. Thus, while the nature of the sample is a limitation, it should be viewed in this context.

Originality/value

While conjoint analysis has existed for decades, this technique has rarely been implemented by logistics/SCM researchers and practitioners. Instead, logistics/SCM researchers and practitioners have focused more on retention methods and have virtually ignored modelling the actual purchase choice of logistics/SCM services. New advancements in conjoint analysis, specifically the ACM approach, have many important and unique advantages and applications for logistics/SCM researchers and practitioners. ACM has not been used in a logistics/SCM context.

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Yen‐Chun Jim Wu

The purpose of the study is to provide readers with an overall picture of contemporary logistics curricula from an international perspective.

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3825

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to provide readers with an overall picture of contemporary logistics curricula from an international perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Comparative analyses of logistics education are performed among Europe, North America, and Asia, between developing nations and developed nations, and between continental nations and island nations.

Findings

The findings of the study are of value in identifying additional educational needs of logistics professionals as well as in hiring new professionals.

Originality/value

Little research has been done to understand contemporary logistics education in a comprehensive way. This paper is the first empirical study to use data available on the web sites of academic logistics programs to provide descriptive analyses of logistics courses offered at universities around the world.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2019

Daniel Taylor, Sebastian Brockhaus, A. Michael Knemeyer and Paul Murphy

Since the emergence of e-commerce uprooted traditional brick-and-mortar retail in the early 2000s, many retailers have reacted by first independently servicing both the…

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2086

Abstract

Purpose

Since the emergence of e-commerce uprooted traditional brick-and-mortar retail in the early 2000s, many retailers have reacted by first independently servicing both the online and in-store channels (multichannel retailing) and subsequently integrating both channels to provide a seamless front-end customer interface (omnichannel retailing). Accordingly, firms had to adjust their logistics and supply chain management (SCM) processes from fulfilling orders for each channel separately to integrating channels on the back-end (omnichannel fulfillment). This development is mirrored by an emerging stream of academic publications. The purpose of this paper is to provide a snapshot of the current state of omnichannel fulfillment research via a systematic literature review (SLR) in order to identify omnichannel fulfillment strategies and to establish an agenda for future inquiry.

Design/methodology/approach

This SLR is based on 104 papers published in peer-reviewed journals through December 2018. It employs a six-step process, from research question to the presentation of the insights.

Findings

All selected manuscripts are categorized based on demographics such as publication date, outlet, methodology, etc. Analysis of the manuscripts suggests that the integration of fulfillment channel inventory and resources is becoming an important objective of fulfillment management. Appropriate omnichannel strategies based on retailer attributes are not well understood. Industry specific research has been conducted necessitating generalized extension for retailers. These findings provide a clear opportunity for the academic community to take more of the lead in terms of knowledge creation by proposing paths for industry pursuit of channel integration to successfully implement omnichannel fulfillment. Opportunities for future inquiry are highlighted.

Originality/value

This manuscript proposes a definition of omnichannel fulfillment strategies and identifies fulfillment links that are used interchangeably across channels as the key delimiter between omnichannel fulfillment strategies and related concepts. Six omnichannel fulfillment strategies from the extant literature are identified and conceptualized. Future research opportunities around omnichannel fulfillment, potential interdependencies between the established strategies and their impact on related SCM issues such as distribution and reverse logistics are detailed.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Alex Ellinger and R. Glenn Richey Jr

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289

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2013

Alex Ellinger and R. Glenn Richey Jr

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1

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2014

Nathalie Fabbe-Costes, Christine Roussat, Margaret Taylor and Andrew Taylor

The purpose of this paper is to explore the empirical reality of environmental scanning (ES) practices in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) contexts. In…

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4276

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the empirical reality of environmental scanning (ES) practices in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) contexts. In particular it tests a conceptual framework proposed in 2011 by Fabbe-Costes et al.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data for this research were obtained from 45 semi-structured interviews with key informants, combined with a discussion of the main results with a focus group of supply chain experts. These data are compared with the literature and brought to bear on the framework.

Findings

The research finds both breadth and depth in the scope of sustainability scanning practices of the respondent group and provides evidence of multi-level scanning, with all respondents describing scanning activity at the societal level. It further demonstrates the adoption of multiple and diverse scanning targets at all levels in the conceptual framework. The articulation and ranking of scanning targets for SSCM at all levels informs the development of priorities for practice. The paper also makes some observations about the boundaries of the scanning process.

Practical implications

The results provide managers with concrete guidance about what to scan in sustainable supply chain contexts. The validated framework can serve as a practical tool to assist managers with the organization and prioritization of their ES activities.

Originality/value

The paper is among the first to address the role of ES in sustainable supply chain contexts. It highlights the need for a multi-level framework for such scanning activities and opens up a debate about their implementation.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Herbert Kotzab and Andreas Otto

Academic discussion in the field of supply chain management is influenced by descriptive, case‐oriented and consultancy‐driven research outcomes. The debate is often…

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5332

Abstract

Academic discussion in the field of supply chain management is influenced by descriptive, case‐oriented and consultancy‐driven research outcomes. The debate is often limited to the search for valid definitions and models of observable facts. The present research makes an alternative effort. This article deals with the question of whether there are any common suggestions that can be condensed to nine process‐based principles that contribute to the management of such chains. The applicability of these principles was evaluated using Thomas and Tymon's notions of “necessary properties of relevant research”.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Ana M. Mejías, Enrique Paz and Juan E. Pardo

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the best way to implement sustainable practices in the Logistics Social Responsibility field. Using the best practices (BPs…

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2804

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the best way to implement sustainable practices in the Logistics Social Responsibility field. Using the best practices (BPs) approach, the authors have answered the question about how logistics function can take on board the principles of sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review has been applied, with an analysis of 194 papers from relevant logistics/supply chain management (SCM)-related journals over a 20-year time frame.

Findings

The authors have identified a first set of traditional BPs that are still relevant in the sustainability context, a second set of innovative sustainable BPs and a third set that can be considered sustainable BPs evolved from the traditional cost-efficiency approach, serving as a link between the other ones. This proposed taxonomy of BPs charts a progressive path toward integration of sustainable principles in SC-logistics operations.

Research limitations/implications

The methodological approaches applied entail inherent limitations. However, the authors have set out to ensure rigor by following a structured process approach.

Originality/value

The work contributes by filling two recurring gaps identified in the literature: the need to integrate social and environmental issues and develop more practical tools for implementing sustainable SCM. The progressive way of implementing sustainable BPs has advantages for logistics managers, especially when companies have limited resources for transforming their logistics process into a sustainable process. Additionally, future academic research topics are proposed.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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