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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Michele Rene Gregory

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between “locker room” hegemonic masculinities at work and the construction of homophobia, particularly the use of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between “locker room” hegemonic masculinities at work and the construction of homophobia, particularly the use of the word “fag” to describe gay men – real or perceived. Although research indicates that men are more homophobic than women, examples are presented which examine some of the reasons why women use the word “fag” at work. Although equal opportunities at work have improved for sexual minorities over the past two decades, studies indicate that some forms of anti‐lesbian, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) behaviour continue, which raises the question whether a hierarchy of inequality exists in some organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used to analyze this under‐researched phenomenon come from the author's observations working for three multinational corporations in the USA.

Findings

The paper shows how men and women engage in locker room culture to construct homophobic narratives.

Research limitations/implications

The issues raised in this article will be useful for empirical studies which examine the relationship between competitive sports and sexuality in the construction of masculine hegemonies in the workplace. Additionally, research should address the workplace experiences of sexual minorities who are also ethnic minorities, and disabled.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the largely invisible research on the role of sports culture, especially the locker room, and gender and sexuality in non‐sports work environments. It also contributes to the study of masculine embodiments by focussing on sports culture such as the locker room, heteronormative‐masculinities and homophobia.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 October 2012

Caroline Fusco

Purpose – The purpose of the chapter is to introduce queer feminist cultural studies methodologies. For illustrative purposes, the chapter draws upon one specific study of…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of the chapter is to introduce queer feminist cultural studies methodologies. For illustrative purposes, the chapter draws upon one specific study of locker room space undertaken by the author.

Design/methodology/approach – The design of the locker room study is delineated, including methods of data collection and analysis: self-reflective narratives, interviews, text and discourse analysis. Issues of contextualisation and insight into the use of queer feminist cultural studies methodologies to study normative geographies are foregrounded.

Findings – Findings acknowledge the systems of knowledge production that cohere around gendered and (hetero)sexed normative and non-normative bodies in locker room spaces.

Research implications – There is no quintessential queer methodology, which is a drawback to researchers trying to forge their way in this area. Instead, all interrogations and interpretations start from a critique of the (hetero)normative discourses and practices of gender and sexuality that take place at the expense of non-normative experiences.

Originality – The chapter provides an overview of queer feminist cultural studies theories and methodologies, for those unfamiliar with this post-positivist and counter-hegemonic approach. The author suggests that queer feminist cultural studies methodologies provoke us to ask the following questions: What new thoughts does my work make possible to think? What new emotions does my work make possible to feel? What new sensations and perceptions does it open up for diverse subjectivities? Such questions take researchers in new and exciting directions.

Details

Qualitative Research on Sport and Physical Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-297-5

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Mark Edward

The over-arching purpose of this paper is to provide a reflexive personal narrative of the inequalities experienced as the author grew up with a desire to dance; personal…

Abstract

Purpose

The over-arching purpose of this paper is to provide a reflexive personal narrative of the inequalities experienced as the author grew up with a desire to dance; personal experiences which influenced the author to become an educator and eventually led the author to engage in some active research on the issue of boys and dance in secondary schools in the north of England.

Design/methodology/approach

This project is based on narrative interviews with young males, as the researchers seek to assess the current landscape of dance education within the UK. Interviews were conducted within two high school settings. Yet, this paper does not focus on the data produced in such interviews. Instead, it adopts a reflective methodology in terms of auto-critiquing the inquiry, exploring themes such as dancing negativity, homophobia and homonormativity.

Findings

The paper offers a brief critique of the literature around long-standing cultural ingrained discrimination experienced by boys who dance. Finally, and importantly, the paper offers a personal and intimate account reflecting on the author's experiences of engaging in research on male dancers in secondary schools.

Originality/value

This paper is a semi-autobiographical reflective inquiry which assesses the current issue of masculinities and dance, within adolescent educational settings. It is important in generating an awareness of the importance of individual and subjective reflective starting points for conducting research and the paper concludes how ethnographic research is never really neutral.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Hilde Rossing and Susie Scott

This chapter reports on the interaction dynamics of a workplace exercise group for beginners. Dramaturgical stress occurred here as individuals who already knew each other…

Abstract

This chapter reports on the interaction dynamics of a workplace exercise group for beginners. Dramaturgical stress occurred here as individuals who already knew each other as competent colleagues felt embarrassed about encountering one another in this low ability exercise group. To resolve this role conflict, participants sought to define themselves as familiar strangers (which they were not) through minimal interaction in non-binding relationships. This was achieved through three types of facework strategy: not only the defensive and protective kinds that Goffman identified as saving individual faces, but also collective strategies, which sought to repair the face of the whole group. Paradoxically, therefore, in attempting to deny their “groupness,” these actors actually displayed and reinforced their solidarity as a performance team.

Details

Revisiting Symbolic Interaction in Music Studies and New Interpretive Works
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-838-9

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 3 March 2021

Susan J. Sample

Abstract

Details

Voices of Teenage Transplant Survivors
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-519-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1967

THE appointment of a Vice‐Chancellor for the University of Warwick was announced towards the end of 1962. The Registrar was next appointed and then the librarian, who…

Abstract

THE appointment of a Vice‐Chancellor for the University of Warwick was announced towards the end of 1962. The Registrar was next appointed and then the librarian, who arrived on the scene in July 1963. The building which is described in this article was envisaged in a programme handed to the architects, Messrs. Yorke, Rosenberg and Mardall, early in December 1963.

Details

New Library World, vol. 68 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Abstract

Subject area

Hospitality and Tourism.

Study level/applicability

Senior undergraduate level and graduate level.

Case overview

This case study charts out the development of a business plan for Ch’ulel Mendoza, a hypothetical all-villa resort nestled against the Andes Mountains, where guests enjoy luxurious wine-infused spa treatments. The business plan has to be comprehensive because it should become the basis of a turnkey project for potential investors. Ch’ulel Mendoza is surrounded by the lush vineyards of some of the most famous wine estates in Argentina. The spa, facilities and services pay homage to the wine-growing heritage of the region, promoting wine to its guests as both pleasurable for consumption and conducive to healthy living. The architectural design speaks directly to the vines themselves: the earth-covered spa is where guests soak up the healing nutrients in the vinotherapy and water treatments, much like the roots are nourished by the elements and water in the soil; the resort area embraces the outdoors with decks, open patios and pools where guests can bask in the sun and enjoy other natural elements, just like the grape plants themselves. Once it becomes operational, Ch’ulel Mendoza will symbolize a blend of wellness, recreation and the charm of the Latin American culture.

Expected learning outcomes

Develop a comprehensive business plan for a new business, understand the business environment, prepare a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and weaknesses analysis, develop functional (marketing, finance, human resources, operations, etc.) plans and understand the opportunities and challenges in the new product development process.

Subject code

CSS: 12: Tourism and Hospitality.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Lesley Bywater

Applies an approach to improving cleaning cost efficiency, outlinedin an earlier article in Facilities, to a multi‐site organisation.Suggests a standard cleaning…

Abstract

Applies an approach to improving cleaning cost efficiency, outlined in an earlier article in Facilities, to a multi‐site organisation. Suggests a standard cleaning specification to enable tendering to be carried out on an area basis and to establish guidelines for improvements in the quality and cost effectiveness of all cleaning operations.

Details

Facilities, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Judy Hodge Sackett

Presents suggestions to be considered in planning a new or renovated academic library. Examples are based on the William T. Young Library, central library at the…

Abstract

Presents suggestions to be considered in planning a new or renovated academic library. Examples are based on the William T. Young Library, central library at the University of Kentucky. The article is based on a presentation given at the American Library Association Annual Conference, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, July 1999, as part of the program “2001 a Space Odyssey: Rethinking Library Buildings in a Digital Age”.

Details

New Library World, vol. 102 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Lynn Aguilera and Erica Dickey

Abstract

Details

A Guide to Healthcare Facility Dress Rehearsal Simulation Planning: Simplifying the Complex
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-555-5

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