Search results

1 – 10 of over 96000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Nicholas Wise, Jelena Đurkin Badurina and Marko Perić

There is a need to rethink destination competitiveness research, which tends to overlook local impacts of events and new developments. Conducting pre-event research…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a need to rethink destination competitiveness research, which tends to overlook local impacts of events and new developments. Conducting pre-event research challenges researchers to move beyond analyzing competitiveness as an end (concerning strategy, tangible outcomes, economic deliverables and value for visitors) to assessing competitiveness as a beginning (through perceptions of place management and local impacts).

Design/methodology/approach

Survey research with local residents explores competitiveness pertinent to perceptions of place management and local impacts. Participation, enthusiasm and information availability are independent variables to assess whether statistically significant differences exist among residents’ perceptions. In total, 454 surveys were collected; the analysis involved exploratory factor analysis and t-test.

Findings

Factor analysis revealed two factors for place management (organizational competencies; managing awareness) and local impacts (awareness of social benefits; local interest and support). Enthusiasm and information availability have stronger influences on residents’ perceptions than participation in pre-event activities.

Practical implications

More emphasis needs put on ensuring information availability promotes enthusiasm, to help encourage participation. These three variables are a necessary basis for exploring residents’ pre-event perceptions – a key starting point to guide decision-making through later stages of an event life-cycle.

Originality/value

Events and competitiveness studies focusing specifically on information availability and enthusiasm of residents is little-explored. By exploring these variables and extending insight on participation, this paper contributes to the literature by assessing pre-event resident perceptions of place management and local impacts (with data collected as event developments were being realized).

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Slah Bahloul and Nawel Ben Amor

This paper investigates the relative importance of local macroeconomic and global factors in the explanation of twelve MENA (Middle East and North Africa) stock market…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the relative importance of local macroeconomic and global factors in the explanation of twelve MENA (Middle East and North Africa) stock market returns across the different quantiles in order to determine their degree of international financial integration.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use both ordinary least squares and quantile regressions from January 2007 to January 2018. Quantile regression permits to know how the effects of explanatory variables vary across the different states of the market.

Findings

The results of this paper indicate that the impact of local macroeconomic and global factors differs across the quantiles and markets. Generally, there are wide ranges in degree of international integration and most of MENA stock markets appear to be weakly integrated. This reveals that the portfolio diversification within the stock markets in this region is still beneficial.

Originality/value

This paper is original for two reasons. First, it emphasizes, over a fairly long period, the impact of a large number of macroeconomic and global variables on the MENA stock market returns. Second, it examines if the relative effects of these factors on MENA stock returns vary or not across the market states and MENA countries.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Hei‐Chia Wang, Ya‐lin Chou and Jiunn‐Liang Guo

The paper's aim is to propose a core journal decision method, called the local impact factor (LIF), which can evaluate the requirements of the local user community by…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's aim is to propose a core journal decision method, called the local impact factor (LIF), which can evaluate the requirements of the local user community by combining both the access rate and the weighted impact factor, and by tracking citation information on the local users' articles.

Design/methodology/approach

Many institutions with a limited budget can subscribe only to the most valuable journals for their users. The importance of a journal to a local community can be calculated in many ways. This paper takes both global and local access frequency and journal citations into consideration. The method of weighted web page link analysis is adopted.

Findings

This paper finds that the weighted page rank may be used efficiently in the core journal decisions. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed LIF can effectively suggest journals to local users better than existing methods (i.e. impact factor or the local journal rank).

Research limitations/implications

This research requires the determination of the thesis scores, which needs authorisation from the authors. If the scores are not available, the scores may be subjectively assigned or retrieved from the other resources.

Practical implications

A case study in National Cheng Kung University was conducted to show that the LIF can be used to help library managers evaluate the real demands of local community users.

Originality/value

Rather than existing research, this paper focuses on the utilisation and requirements of local community users and also finds the contributions of citation information to be significant and critical.

Details

Program, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Bernard G. Hounmenou and Fabrice D. Degbedji

This paper aims to study the impact of municipalities’ own resources on their investments‘ expenditure.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the impact of municipalities’ own resources on their investments‘ expenditure.

Design/methodology/approach

Panel data analysis. A sample of 34 municipalities in Benin. Econometrics tests for the panel data models – estimation of the fixed-effect and random-effect models. Hausman test to identify the best model to explain the impact of the explanatory variables on local investments’ expenditures. Heteroskedasticity, normality and autocorrelation tests.

Findings

The results establish a positive and significant impact of own resources, state transfers and demographic variables on local investments’ expenses.

Research limitations/implications

As an implication, the results show the importance of local resources’ mobilization for the municipalities’ investment capacity building. They also show that the central government transfers continue to play a major place in local investments’ finance, even in a decentralization context. Limitation: Available data do not allow to well evaluate the impact of the electoral variable on municipalities’ investments’ expenditure. This situation does not allow to well analyze the public choice considerations in local authorities’ behaviors.

Practical implications

Local mobilization of financial resources must be encouraged to raise municipalities’ investments’ capacities. Strategies must be developed to reinforce local capacities in local resources mobilization.

Social implications

The results show the importance of local resources in local investments. They show the importance of citizens’ participation in their well-being construction, through local resource mobilization (ex: local fiscality).

Originality/value

Many authors assert in the literature that financial autonomy has a real impact on local development. However, empirically, it was not demonstrated. This paper contributes to correct this lack.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Carrie Blanchard Bush, Ellen M. Key and Robert D. Eskridge

This research explores the role of political ideology in local policy formation by assessing the impact of the city manager's ideology on local expenditures. While…

Abstract

This research explores the role of political ideology in local policy formation by assessing the impact of the city manager's ideology on local expenditures. While previous studies have identified nuanced and overlapping roles between administration and politics, here we extend those investigations by positing that ideology may influence a manager's role in the policy formation of the budget. Although some conceptualizations of city managers assume them to be largely apolitical in a partisan sense, we find a significant effect of ideology on local expenditures among city managers. This adds to the literature that suggests that city managers may not merely passively implement policies created by elected officials; rather city managers may influence policy in multifaceted ways, thereby driving a need to further investigate individual influences upon policy formation.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 September 2018

Terry David Gibson, Aka Festus Tongwa, Sarwar Bari, Guillaume Chantry, Manu Gupta, Jesusa Grace Molina, Nisha Shresha, John Norton, Bhubaneswari Parajuli, Hepi Rahmawati and Ruiti Aretaake

The purpose of this paper is to individually examine the findings from eight case studies presented in this special issue and comparatively identify the findings regarding…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to individually examine the findings from eight case studies presented in this special issue and comparatively identify the findings regarding local learning and action.

Design/methodology/approach

Underlying research questions regarding power and powerlessness in regard to addressing underlying risk factors affecting local populations form the basis for the discussion. Proceedings of a collaborative workshop conducted with the contributing authors are analysed qualitatively to identify learning relating to the research questions emerging from the case studies individually and collectively.

Findings

A number of strategies and tactics for addressing underlying risk factors affecting local populations were identified from the case studies, including collaboration and cohesion. Campaigning, lobbying, communications and social mobilisation in an attempt to bridge the gap between local concerns and the decision-making of government and other powerful actors. Innovation and local mobilisation to address shortcomings in government support for disaster reduction and development. Communications as a first base to influence behaviour of both communities and government. Social change through empowerment of women to act in disaster reduction and development.

Research limitations/implications

The outcomes of the action research conducted by the authors individually and collectively highlight the necessity for bridging different scales of action through a range of strategies and tactics to move beyond local self-reliance to influence on underlying risk factors. The action research process employed may have wider applications in gathering and formalising local-level experience and knowledge.

Practical implications

The case studies and their analysis present a range of practical strategies and tactics to strengthen local resilience and address underlying risk factors which are replicable in other contexts.

Originality/value

Practitioners are activists and do not often engage in critical reflection and analysis. The method presented here offers a means of achieving this in order to generate learning from local-level experience. The findings contribute to the consideration of cross-scale action to address underlying risk factors which impact local communities.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Florian Kriechbaumer

This paper aims to provide an overview of how trends encompassing SOLOMO (social, local, mobile) factors impact marketing activities in small and medium-sized hospitality…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of how trends encompassing SOLOMO (social, local, mobile) factors impact marketing activities in small and medium-sized hospitality enterprises (SMEs). It explores the relevancy of these factors and their application in the industry and synthesizes them in the context of Dubai’s path toward Expo 2020 by collecting practitioner input.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides continuity with the author’s previous WHATT article exploring SME website implementation by expanding its scope by analyzing literature on SOLOMO adoption in the hospitality industry, drawing from a range of journals and applicable industry sources. It collects informal commentary from practitioners with relevant local experience to contextualize the findings within Dubai’s digital roadmap.

Findings

Several aspects of SOLOMO in the context of hospitality have been examined by researchers; however, their successful applicability to the SME sector (which is still struggling with the fundamentals of website implementation) lacks comprehensive consideration. There is a dearth of academic and governmental guidance for industry executives. At the same time, trends beyond SOLOMO, particularly around data analytics, are emerging and require incorporation into a digital SME roadmap.

Practical implications

Executives in the hospitality SME domain are encouraged to continue focusing on the fundamentals of website implementation while they take into consideration the trends around SOLOMO identified in the study. A holistic, result-driven view of digital marketing is required to ensure focused resource usage. Closer collaboration between private sector, policymakers and academia will support Dubai’s initiatives to leverage its high degree of technological readiness for marketing innovation in the SME sector.

Originality/value

This manuscript provides a practically oriented and engaging overview of the applicability of SOLOMO concepts for hospitality SMEs, with a local focus on the Dubai ecosystem.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Imon Chowdhooree and Ishrat Islam

Enhancing community flood resilience is a critical aspect of flood risk management that requires a systematic process of capacity building through incorporating mitigation…

Abstract

Purpose

Enhancing community flood resilience is a critical aspect of flood risk management that requires a systematic process of capacity building through incorporating mitigation measures. The inhabitants of South Rishipara, a riverside settlement of Bangladesh, are accommodating themselves in a flood-prone location through modifying their built environment. The purpose of this study is to conduct a detailed investigation regarding the built environment development and find out roles of different actors and contributing factors for enhancing community flood resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study-based post-positivist research uses multiple lines of inquiries, which include focus group discussions, transect walks, in-depth semi-structured interviews, pair-wise comparisons and a questionnaire survey, mostly in a participatory appraisal manner to obtain data about community experiences and perceptions.

Findings

About 66.7 per cent of respondents identified themselves as severely affected by flood before the recent development with increased elevation of land, flood protection walls, reclaimed land from the river, underground drainage system, a new layout of plots and houses of better quality. In the post-development situation, not a single respondent identified him/ her in that condition. “Coordination and cooperation among GOs, NGOs and donor agency” (GO: governmental organization; NGO: nongovernmental organization) and “awareness about the flood vulnerability” were identified as key factors and the NGO was identified as the key actor for enhancing community flood resilience by the survey participants.

Originality/value

This research, through exploring the nuanced relationship between built environment development and community resilience, will contribute to address uncertainties associated with community capacities to respond to risks.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Taylor Witte, Eric A DeVuyst, Brian Whitacre and Rodney Jones

Farm Credit is a major provider of credit to agricultural producers in Oklahoma and nationally. The decision to place a new Farm Credit office reduces borrower search and…

Abstract

Purpose

Farm Credit is a major provider of credit to agricultural producers in Oklahoma and nationally. The decision to place a new Farm Credit office reduces borrower search and travel costs and should increase loan volume. The purpose of this paper is to model the new loan volume as function of distance from east central Oklahoma county centroids to Farm Credit offices. The model is then used to predict the impact of placing new offices in underserved areas.

Design/methodology/approach

County aggregate new loan volume is regressed on distances to Farm Credit branch and field offices and other variables expected to impact agricultural loan volume. The estimated model is used to predict new loan volume impact of adding additional branch and field offices in counties that did not have these offices. Confidence intervals are used to measure the significance of predicted loan volumes.

Findings

Distances from county centroids to both branch and field offices were found to significantly reduce new loan volume. The results were used to simulate the addition of new branch and field offices. The simulation predicted the added annual new loan volume associated with office additions.

Practical implications

Using spatial models, Farm Credit of east central Oklahoma and other agricultural lenders can better plan for expansion (or consolidation). These models indicate counties where annual new loan volume will likely be higher (or lower for consolidation) than other nearby counties. The result can be improved borrower access and system financial performance.

Originality/value

While spatial modeling has been utilized in other sectors, little has been done relative to agricultural credit access and impact on loan volume. The model here explicitly models the impact that distance to Farm Credit offices have on annual new loan volume.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 75 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 October 2018

Ahmed Maher khafaga Shehata and Metwaly Ali Mohamed Eldakar

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a study to explore the Egyptian social science scholars’ academic writing behaviour in local and international…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a study to explore the Egyptian social science scholars’ academic writing behaviour in local and international context. Understanding the challenges that scholars in social science and humanities face while publishing in the international outlets would help to suggest strategies to improve academic writing in non-Arabic journals.

Design/methodology/approach

This study deployed mixed methods approach. The quantitative data were collected using an online questionnaire. Interviews were conducted with a group of scholars in the five faculties to elucidate the publishing behaviour of the sample.

Findings

The interviews and the questionnaire showed that social science scholars in Egypt prefer local publishing outlets. The number of scholars who publish internationally is very low compared to scholars who publish locally. Scholars who tried to publish internationally faced many challenges, such as language barriers, lack of academic writing skills and lack of appropriate training.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in one university in Egypt. While the results can be generalised to Egyptian and Middle East universities, it cannot be generalised to non-Arab communities because of the differences in culture and education system.

Originality/value

This study provides insight on publishing practices in the international context among social science scholars in Egypt using a mixed methods approach. This helped to capture the scholarly publishing practices and the attitude toward international publishing and the main challenges that scholars face who attempt to publish in international outlets.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 96000