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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2008

Gemma Burges and Sarah Monk

This paper presents the findings of recent research exploring how local authorities are delivering affordable housing through the planning system, focusing on their use of…

Abstract

This paper presents the findings of recent research exploring how local authorities are delivering affordable housing through the planning system, focusing on their use of Section 106 (S106) of the Town and Country Planning Act (1990). Policy and practice vary between local authorities. While the amount of affordable housing delivered through S106 has increased, there is pressure on local authorities to improve performance further as affordability has worsened across the country. This paper highlights the issues that local authorities face, and makes some recommendations for good practice.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2019

David Manase and Valentah Siamuzwe

Literature reveals that local authorities in Scotland are required under the Housing (Scotland) Act 2001 to undertake housing need and demand assessment. Local authorities

Abstract

Purpose

Literature reveals that local authorities in Scotland are required under the Housing (Scotland) Act 2001 to undertake housing need and demand assessment. Local authorities are required to ensure that their local housing strategies are evidenced with an assessment of housing need and demand. The housing needs and demand assessment (HNDA) framework was designed to help local authorities in Scotland provide the evidence base for local strategies. Since its introduction in 2014, there is a limited literature highlighting whether or not the framework has been effective. To this end, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the HNDA framework as set in Scottish local authorities; this paper aims to highlight those factors that have been effective in the framework.

Design/methodology/approach

An evaluation to asses empirically the effectiveness of the HNDA framework in Scotland was conducted. The research involved a review of literature on the current HNDA framework in Scotland. A measure of the effectiveness of the HNDA framework was conducted via a questionnaire survey to get the practitioner’s perception from 32 Scottish local authorities. This was conducted to advance specific features that have been effective in the HNDA framework. The features were then ranked in terms of their degree of effectiveness.

Findings

The research in this paper identifies initial findings cited in literature of effective factors that impact on the effectiveness of typical projects and contextualises them in the HNDA framework in Scotland, the HNDA framework having all hallmarks of a project. Results from this study identified effectiveness factors that have a greater influence on the HNDA framework’s general effectiveness. These factors include amongst others: clearly defined and detailed scope; project monitoring and control; competent and experienced project managers; and sufficient and well-allocated resources.

Research limitations/implications

By examining the factors individually, it can be stated that overall and based on literature and survey, the HNDA framework as used in Scotland has largely been successful. The success, however, is on a case by case basis. For example, those in remote-based local authorities expressed reservations on whether some of the identified effectiveness factors in the framework were effective while those in more metropolitan or larger local authorities were more upbeat with the HNDA framework.

Originality/value

No similar study has been carried out on effectiveness factors in the HNDA framework used in Scottish local authorities. The findings in this research, therefore, contribute to the literature that seeks to understand the mechanisms of an effective HNDA in general and the HNDA framework in Scotland in particular. Overall, it contributes to the housing debate by offering a Scottish perspective. The study is a precursor to the mechanism for the housing need and demand and funding success in Scotland.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Peter Wyatt

The theoretical case for land value capture is well-known, but the effectiveness of affordable housing delivery as a capture mechanism is not so well-documented. Building…

Abstract

Purpose

The theoretical case for land value capture is well-known, but the effectiveness of affordable housing delivery as a capture mechanism is not so well-documented. Building on the earlier theoretical and empirical work of Whitehead (1991, 2007) and Crook and Whitehead (2002), the purpose of this paper is to consider the provision of affordable housing from a land value capture viewpoint, focusing on the process by which the amount of affordable housing is determined between landowners/developers on the one hand and local planning authorities on the other.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a mixed-mode approach for the data collection. Two surveys of local planning authorities were undertaken, together with a series of case study interviews.

Findings

The paper evaluates whether land value capture has been an effective mechanism for delivering affordable housing by focusing on three principal areas: first, the political agenda in relation to land value capture and the supply of affordable housing; second, the nature and motivation of the stakeholders involved in affordable housing decision-making; and third, the use of economic models as decision tools for determining the amount and type of affordable housing are negotiated.

Originality/value

The research provides some insight into the effectiveness of local authority affordable housing targets as a means of capturing the uplift in land value that results from the grant of planning permission.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Michel Vols and Alexandre Copeland Belloir

In 2011, Dutch municipalities requested supplementary legal enforcement instruments to tackle rogue landlords and substandard housing. The national government implemented…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2011, Dutch municipalities requested supplementary legal enforcement instruments to tackle rogue landlords and substandard housing. The national government implemented new legislation granting municipalities’ local authorities more legal instruments in 2015. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the application and effectiveness of these instruments.

Design/methodology/approach

Using both quantitative and qualitative (legal) empirical research methods, this study establishes the frequency these instruments are used and the manner they are applied in practice to determine their role in limiting abusive practices of rogue landlords.

Findings

By comparing legislation and policies with their enforcement, the authors pinpoint differences between the law in the books and the law in practice and argue that the legal instruments have a stronger effect on the informal power than on formal power of local authorities. Moreover, the paper shows that the shift of responsibility from the Public Prosecutions Office to local authorities has left the Public Prosecutions Office disinterested, feeling that it no longer has to deal with substandard housing violations at all, therefore leaving the repeat offenders free to continue their activities with minor consequences.

Originality/value

The paper presents original data on the ways governments address substandard housing and rogue landlords. This is the first study that analyses the fight against substandard housing in the Dutch context. Although centred on legislation and procedures in The Netherland, the paper’s findings are relevant in other jurisdictions facing similar issues.

Details

Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9407

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Book part
Publication date: 14 May 1997

Lynn C. Todman

Abstract

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Government for the Future
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-852-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1983

David Hughes LLB

Property managers in the private domestic sector will be aware of the problems which beset that seemingly inexorably shrinking part of the housing market. The complexities…

Abstract

Property managers in the private domestic sector will be aware of the problems which beset that seemingly inexorably shrinking part of the housing market. The complexities deriving from the Rent Acts, and the facts that (a) owner occupiers paying mortgages receive mortgage interest relief; (b) public sector tenants receive assistance with their housing costs in the form of exchequer subsidies; and (c) private sector tenants can receive a ‘hidden’ subsidy in the form of ‘fair rent’ restrictions, while the private landlord himself receives no such help with his housing costs or tax burden — all these combine to make the lot of the lessor of private rent accommodation a less than happy one.

Details

Property Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Rosanna Duncan and Julianne Mortimer

The main aim of this study is to ascertain the progress in implementing the actions contained within the BME Housing Action Plan for Wales, by the Welsh Assembly…

Abstract

Purpose

The main aim of this study is to ascertain the progress in implementing the actions contained within the BME Housing Action Plan for Wales, by the Welsh Assembly Government (WAG) and social landlords in Wales.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was carried out between December 2004 and May 2005. This paper discusses some of the main findings from the systematic review of BME housing strategies and action plans covering 22 local authorities and 32 housing associations in Wales.

Findings

It was clear from all aspects of the research that the WAG's BME Housing Action Plan for Wales is having a positive impact on the profile and awareness of BME housing issues in Wales. However, the degree and extent of progress varied throughout Wales.

Research limitations/implications

BME housing issues have a high profile in the social housing sector in Wales. It is important that this positive profile is maintained and does not lose momentum due to increasing and competing priorities.

Practical implications

Currently, the lack of incentives for compliance (and penalties for non‐compliance) presents a potential disincentive to the long‐term sustainability of the present enthusiasm and momentum on BME housing issues in Wales.

Originality/value

This research is the first to evaluate the progress made by social landlords in implementing the WAG's BME Housing Action Plan for Wales.

Details

Property Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Francine Baker

The paper will aim to examine the contemporary origins and development of the planning system and housing regulation in England and Ireland. One objective is to broadly…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper will aim to examine the contemporary origins and development of the planning system and housing regulation in England and Ireland. One objective is to broadly explicate how the regulation of housing in England began, with reference to Ireland, and its relationship with the planning system. The other is to outline the swing in England from a hotchpotch decentralised system to a centralised, and back again sharply to decentralised approach to planning and the provision for housing, a swing unparalleled in Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is to consider the main influences on the regulation of planning and housing, with reference to historical, social and legal regulatory developments, and to broadly assess the role of centralised and decentralised systems.

Findings

The regulation of housing was an incidental product of the regulation of public health. The use of town and country planning principles could have assisted such regulation, but were unpopular until the development of a centralised system of planning in the 20th century. This has led to problems in Ireland for the delivery of local services. The change in England under the Localism Act to decentralized system is unlikely to achieve an effective use of local resources. It is unlikely that unwieldy new systems of decision‐making and funding arrangements will improve the provision of housing for low incomes and the poor. A balance between the use of both systems is required.

Originality/value

This paper assesses the impact of social, historical, administrative and legal changes that have impacted on the progress of the relationship between planning and housing regulation in England and Ireland over the last two centuries until the present day.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Patricia Ng

The purpose of this paper is to explore the appropriateness of mediation as a homelessness prevention tool for statutorily homeless people who are in need of emergency…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the appropriateness of mediation as a homelessness prevention tool for statutorily homeless people who are in need of emergency housing assistance from local authorities in England. It is argued that although mediation is potentially an effective method for facilitating communication as a homelessness prevention tool, caution needs to be exercised in its use in attempting to prevent immediate homelessness.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth interviews were carried out with five housing law practitioners and six mediators. The paper also draws on observations made by commentators on homelessness legislation as well as ADR. Government papers, including guidance and policy papers and statutes, have been examined.

Findings

Mediation could potentially offer effective assistance to homeless people, although it is questionable whether immediate homelessness could genuinely be prevented. In addition, in order to prevent potentially unlawful decisions being made, local authority officers need to take into account their reactive duties under Part VII of the Housing Act 1996 as amended by the Homelessness Act 2002.

Research limitations/implications

Findings from the research address homelessness mediation, an area that requires discussion. More research is needed on the benefits of mediation to homeless people.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to discussions between a range of academics and practitioners interested in the potential benefits of mediation in the context of homelessness work.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Laura Dawson, Jacquetta Williams and Ann Netten

Extra care housing enables older people to remain in their ‘own home’, while providing appropriate housing and access to health and social care services that are…

Abstract

Extra care housing enables older people to remain in their ‘own home’, while providing appropriate housing and access to health and social care services that are responsive to their needs. This type of provision is very much in line with the government policy of fostering people's sense of control and independence, and is a priority area for expansion. We explored the current levels of development and expansion of extra care housing in terms of the numbers of schemes and places and factors that contributed to and were problematic in its development.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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