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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

F.P. Baker

Considers the role of marketing in an increasingly profit‐orientedlocal authority. Discusses the problems involved when a public serviceespouses marketing principles, but…

Abstract

Considers the role of marketing in an increasingly profit‐oriented local authority. Discusses the problems involved when a public service espouses marketing principles, but concludes that only marketing can make most effective use of the scarce resources available to local authorities.

Details

Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2538

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Stephanie Snape and John Fenwick

During the last 15 years, local authorities in many OECD countries have been introducing competition for the provision of services, placing less emphasis on the direct…

Abstract

During the last 15 years, local authorities in many OECD countries have been introducing competition for the provision of services, placing less emphasis on the direct provision of services and more on the strategic planning of service provision. Often this has involved encouraging both private firms and voluntary organizations to become providers of local government services. Analyses the emergence of enabling in two European countries, Ireland and the UK, and argues that local authorities in both countries are reluctant enablers. With reference to the UK, examines the implications of the CCT legislation, the key factor in the development of enabling and compares this to the emergence in Ireland of a trend towards contracting out.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Annika Schneider and Grant Samkin

The purpose of this paper is to assess the extent and quality of intellectual capital disclosures (ICDs) in the annual reports of the New Zealand local government sector.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the extent and quality of intellectual capital disclosures (ICDs) in the annual reports of the New Zealand local government sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper makes use of an ICD index constructed through a participatory stakeholder consultation process to develop a disclosure index which measures the extent and quality intellectual capital reporting in the 2004/2005 annual reports of 82 local government authorities in New Zealand. The final index comprised 26 items divided into three categories: internal, external and human capital.

Findings

The results indicate that the reporting of intellectual capital by local government authorities is varied. The most reported items were joint ventures/business collaborations and management processes, while the least reported items were intellectual property and licensing agreements. The most reported category of intellectual capital was internal capital, followed by external capital. Human capital was the least reported category.

Research limitations/implications

There are a number of limitations associated with this study. First the research covered only one year (2004/2005) which makes it difficult to draw any trend conclusions. Second, differing legal reporting requirements may make it difficult to compare findings of this research with findings of research conducted in other jurisdictions. The final limitation of this study is its exploratory nature of this research and the use of a disclosure index to measure disclosure levels.

Practical implications

The results in this paper indicate that local authorities are disclosing some aspects of intellectual capital in their annual reports. However, there is no consistent reporting framework and many areas of ICDs do not meet stakeholder expectations.

Originality/value

This paper is unique in that it is the first study to make use of an ICD index to examine intellectual capital reporting by local government authorities.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Paul R. Drake and Bethan M. Davies

This paper is the sequel to the authors' earlier paper in this journal and aims to present the “future research” outlined in that paper.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is the sequel to the authors' earlier paper in this journal and aims to present the “future research” outlined in that paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The approaches being employed by Welsh local authorities in commissioning home care from the independent sector are surveyed to see how a mixed economy of care is being implemented. The observed differences are analysed to see what can be learnt for the benefit of public sector managers concerned with the development of commissioning practices. Semi‐structured interviews have been performed with home care managers and commissioning officers in 13 (60 per cent) of the local, unitary authorities in Wales. Managers at independent home care providers have been interviewed also. The study has been ongoing since September 2004. For comparison, Barnet in England has been included because, unlike any Welsh authority, it has implemented 100 per cent outsourcing of home care. Croydon has been included as it has a good practice brokerage that has helped it to expand its provision from the independent sector.

Findings

Great diversity is seen in the approaches adopted by the Welsh local authorities when commissioning home care from the independent sector. They differ in the proportion of home care that is commissioned from the independent sector, what is commissioned, the number of independent providers and the contractual arrangements. These features are used to develop a taxonomy of home care strategies that reveals high levels of diversity. It is seen that in Wales there has been less political drive and compulsion to outsource home care than in England, but the natural desire to reduce costs in the face of a growing need for home care is now driving outsourcing in Wales.

Practical implications

This paper provides guidance to public sector managers in local authorities seeking best practice in the commissioning of home care from the independent sector.

Originality/value

The existing literature contains little research into good practice in the commissioning of home care by local authorities from the independent sector. This paper is a timely contribution to addressing this shortfall.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Tony Bovaird and Paul Davis

This article sets out the main conclusions of a research project into how UK local authorities are managing within limited resources (MLR). Frameworks are developed to aid…

Abstract

This article sets out the main conclusions of a research project into how UK local authorities are managing within limited resources (MLR). Frameworks are developed to aid authorities to plan their approaches to MLR and to situate what they have already done and what they plan to do within a wider portfolio of tactics and strategies. An evaluation is made of how well local government is learning its way through to getting “more from less” and of what local authority support agencies need to do to help authorities to accelerate their learning. Finally, the authors argue that existing learning systems like benchmarking and quality management, while developing rapidly in local government, need further, significant refinement if the costs and benefits of resource management strategies are to be systematically evaluated.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2008

Zorlu Senyucel

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of understanding the mutually constitutive relationships between the provider (suppliers of information…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of understanding the mutually constitutive relationships between the provider (suppliers of information communication technologies (ICTs)) and user (service departments of ICTs) groups in UK local authorities in order to see the changing work patterns of public sector employees during the modernization process.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the literature on the use of the ICTs in local authorities, as well as related literature on user‐provider relationship. Empirical research is gathered from a survey of 22 UK local authorities and five in‐depth case studies.

Findings

The framework shows how the use of ICTs changes the way public sector employee's work, especially when dealing with the Modernization Agenda. The framework highlights that the use of technology alters the roles of user and provider groups, in particular, their sanctioning behaviour, use of resources and barriers they face in their work routines.

Practical implications

The findings should be of value to policy makers who need to understand the changing work patterns in local authorities in order to plan new ways of public service delivery.

Originality/value

The paper illuminates the impact of the use of ICTs on the way different groups of employees work and interact with each other everyday during the time of public sector reform in UK local authorities.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part
Publication date: 18 October 2014

Emmanuel Auber, Elodie Chabaud, Automne Chabernaud, Clément Le Bras-Thomas, Etienne Longueville and Elena Suzat

Great Britain is a laboratory for new techniques of public management; it is therefore an interesting place to look at for people willing to get involved in large public…

Abstract

Purpose

Great Britain is a laboratory for new techniques of public management; it is therefore an interesting place to look at for people willing to get involved in large public organisations. The French ‘institute for local studies’, trains future professionals, selected after graduation or after a working experience, in order to take high positions in local authorities nationwide. Three pairs of trainees belonging to the 2012–2013 group spent two weeks in three local authorities in England, with the purpose of analysing the performance management in these organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

British and French scholars dedicated to public organisations provided the six trainees with a global view of local government and reforms in the United Kingdom. After that, each pair exchanged information with the local authority they would visit; during the two weeks they spent there, an officer followed their works. They interviewed numerous professionals, elected members and unionists, attended meetings and events. Back in France, they presented their findings in several documents. The original subject was measuring and managing performance; in fact, the three pairs went farther and looked over many aspects of the organisations’ functioning.

Findings

Local authorities are facing important budget reductions and appear fragile; they put forward the idea of resilience to express the necessity of using all their resources to deal with a difficult situation. Elected members have a role of political initiative, but they also focus a lot on control, which is much more developed in Britain than in France; managers experience a very difficult period, with a lot of threats on their jobs, teams and projects. In this context, professional networks are very important; peer review is an interesting example of the role of professional exchanges in the search for new solutions. At last, unions don’t seek conflicts but try to accompany changes, lessening their negative consequences on people.

Originality/value

This work is not an academic one but an approach of the reality of organisations analysed by professionals or future professionals of the public sector, in a kind of ‘peer review’ between different countries. This international dimension is interesting, seeing that few in-depth comparisons between local authorities are made, especially between France and Britain.

Details

European Public Leadership in Crisis?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-901-0

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2019

Kelly Maguire and Emmet McLoughlin

Events are a significant component of Ireland’s tourism offering. They are an important source of economic activity and an incremental driver of social change and…

Abstract

Purpose

Events are a significant component of Ireland’s tourism offering. They are an important source of economic activity and an incremental driver of social change and development throughout the country. However, the visual and physical impacts often created by event activities to the environmental and social resource base upon which, events depend, have begun to draw attention to the way events are planned and managed. Although the concept of sustainability has become the topic of much discussion and debate in event management literature, there exist many gaps in relation to its practical application in event management planning in Ireland. This is despite the statutory obligation of local authorities in Ireland to license events and to facilitate the process of planning for large-scale outdoor public events in Ireland. Yet, with the continued expansion of Ireland’s event industry, there is a fundamental need for an evidence-informed approach to planning for event management. Through the application of the European tourism indicator system (ETIS), the long-term sustainability and competitiveness of the national event industry in Ireland could be secured. This paper aims to examine and discuss the application of the ETIS as a possible tool to facilitate greater levels of sustainability and accountability within the events industry in Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a quantitative content analysis approach involving a complete population sample of local authorities in the Republic of Ireland to determine the application of the ETIS within the legal process of planning for event management in Ireland.

Findings

While the findings have identified a basic provision for event management within a number of local authority legally required County Development Plans, none, however, were using the ETIS to monitor the impacts of events at the local level. This lack of data collection and benchmarking highlights the need for greater levels of sustainability and accountability within the legal process of planning for event management in Ireland.

Originality/value

This study suggests the ETIS as an easy, cost effective and viable solution to facilitate an evidence-informed approach to planning for event management at the local level. However, the lessons learned from this study may also have implications for destination planners and event managers outside of Ireland.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Steve Martin

Draws upon detailed empirical work undertaken with elected members and senior officers from a sample of 30 UK local authorities. Its focus is on the ways in which…

Abstract

Draws upon detailed empirical work undertaken with elected members and senior officers from a sample of 30 UK local authorities. Its focus is on the ways in which authorities have responded to rapid changes in the economic, social and political contexts and the profound challenges which these present to traditional modes of policy making and public management. Suggests that existing theoretical frameworks give insufficient attention to implications of changing local governance for the roles of elected members and that, in practice, most councillors feel ill‐equipped to respond to these changes. Local authorities need therefore to develop training and support for local politicians in fulfilling their rapidly changing and increasingly demanding roles. In particular they should look at ways of supporting elected members in working with external agencies so that they bring the “added value” of locally accountable political leadership to the work of partnerships involving public, private and voluntary sectors agencies. This will require them to embrace new forms of communication and methods of learning which are likely to be one of the key ingredients in attempts to revitalize local democracy.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 10 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Erik Albæk

As the result of a major local government reform in 1970, most welfare functions in Denmark are dealt with at the local level of government, effectively turning the…

Abstract

As the result of a major local government reform in 1970, most welfare functions in Denmark are dealt with at the local level of government, effectively turning the extensive Danish "welfare state" into "welfare communes" as municipalities are called in the Scandinavian languages. With more than half of the country's total public expenditure being spent by local authorities, regulation of local govenment budgets has become a major concern in the economic policy of the Danish central government. Since the early 1980s the realization of the goal of limited growth in Danish local government spending has been quite successful. One explanation for this comparatively successful regulation of local government spending in Denmark can be foundin the combined effects of two factors: 1) Danish local authorities have the independent right to levy taxes, and 2) the regulation of local budgets is the result of a negotiated agreement between central and local government actors, known in Danish as "budgetary cooperation."

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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