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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2010

Ray Fisk, Stephen Grove, Lloyd C. Harris, Dominique A. Keeffe, Kate L. Daunt, Rebekah Russell‐Bennett and Jochen Wirtz

The purpose of this paper is to highlight important issues in the study of dysfunctional customer behavior and to provide a research agenda to inspire, guide, and enthuse…

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7447

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight important issues in the study of dysfunctional customer behavior and to provide a research agenda to inspire, guide, and enthuse. Through a critical evaluation of existing research, the aim is to highlight key issues and to present potentially worthy avenues for future study.

Design/methodology/approach

In reviewing recent and past advances in the study of customers behaving badly, an overview of existing research into customers behaving badly and addressing issues of terminology and definition is provided. Thereafter, three perspectives that provide the most opportunity and insight in studying the darker side of service dynamics are outlined. This leads to a review of some of the research design and methodological problems and issues that are faced when rigorously studying these issues. Subsequently, the paper devotes a section to the provocative idea that while dysfunctional customer behavior has many negative influences on customers, employees, and service firms, there are actually some positive functions of customers behaving badly.

Findings

A research agenda is provided that is believed to identify and discuss a range of projects that comprises not only insightful theoretical contributions but is also practically relevant.

Originality/value

The paper identifies a range of issues about which managers should be aware and proactively manage.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Kate L. Daunt and Lloyd C. Harris

This paper aims to examine the associations between individual factors (personality and demographic variables) and contextual factors (servicescape and situation‐specific…

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5184

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the associations between individual factors (personality and demographic variables) and contextual factors (servicescape and situation‐specific variables), and the motives that drive episodes of dysfunctional customer behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Self‐report data were collected from a survey of bar, hotel, and restaurant customers (n=380). Confirmatory factor analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis were utilized to analyze the data.

Findings

Analysis of the data revealed three clusters of motives labelled: financial egotists, money grabbers, and ego revengers. Statistically significant differences were revealed across the personality, servicescape, and situation specific variables for each motive. However, no differences were found concerning demographic variables.

Research limitations/implications

This research emphasizes the primacy of three customer behavior motivations. Future research might investigate the motives for dysfunctional customer behavior across different organizational contexts and the dynamics between such motivations.

Practical implications

The findings of the study indicate that service managers can proactively control and manipulate servicescape and situation‐specific variables that relate to customer misbehavior motives.

Originality/value

No existing scholarly research has developed a data‐grounded understanding of the motivations of dysfunctional customer behaviors. Moreover, to date, no study has explored the associations between customer's motives to misbehave and personality, situation specific, servicescape, and demographic variables.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2010

Lloyd C. Harris and Rebekah Russell-Bennett

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538

Abstract

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Lloyd C. Harris

Although there has been much academic discussion of employee behaviours as potential barriers to market orientation, comparatively little attention has been focused on…

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6243

Abstract

Although there has been much academic discussion of employee behaviours as potential barriers to market orientation, comparatively little attention has been focused on organizational barriers to market orientation. No single study has undertaken a holistic review of structural, strategic and systems impediments. The aim of this paper is to extend and synthesize existing research into the obstacles to market orientation by performing a holistic analysis of the organizational characteristics which influence the extent of market orientation in an organization. This paper begins with a brief review of existing research into the barriers to developing market orientation. After a discussion of research design and methodology, the summary findings of three in‐depth case studies are presented and eight hypotheses are forwarded. Thereafter, the results of a survey of organizational barriers to market orientation are presented and the findings are discussed. The paper concludes with a number of implications for both strategic marketing and management theory and practice.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 34 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Kate L. Reynolds and Lloyd C. Harris

Proposes responding to earlier calls for further research into “fraudulent” or “feigned” customer complaints, and providing insights which explore and describe the…

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8304

Abstract

Purpose

Proposes responding to earlier calls for further research into “fraudulent” or “feigned” customer complaints, and providing insights which explore and describe the motivations and forms of such deliberate “illegitimate” customer complaints.

Design/methodology/approach

Critical incident technique was utilized in analyzing 104 interviews with customers who had knowingly made an illegitimate complaint within the six months prior to the interview. Data collection stopped at the point of theoretical saturation and was subsequently analyzed according to the coding procedures advocated by Strauss and Corbin (open, axial and selective coding).

Findings

Two key insights emerged from data analysis. First, coding procedures revealed four distinct forms of customer complainants. These are labeled; “one‐off complainants”, “opportunistic complainants”, “conditioned complainants”, and “professional complainants”. Second, six main motives for articulating fraudulent complaints were uncovered during data analysis. These are termed; “freeloaders”, “fraudulent returners”, “fault transferors”, “solitary ego gains”, “peer‐induced esteem seekers”, and “disruptive gains”.

Research limitations/implications

The study is constrained by its exploratory design and qualitative methods employed. Subsequently, future studies could employ survey methods to improve empirical generalizability. Future studies could adopt a more inclusive approach and incorporate insights from employees, managers, and other relevant actors within service encounters.

Practical implications

Practical implications highlighted by the study include a need for businesses to examine and, in many cases, reevaluate their personnel training, customer complaint and service recovery procedures. Furthermore, managers may wish to enforce mechanisms wherein customer complaints are monitored and tracked in a manner that assists in the identification and challenging of re‐offending fraudulent complainers.

Originality/value

The study constitutes the first systematic attempt to explore and describe illegitimate customer complaining behaviors.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2010

Lloyd C. Harris and Mark M.H. Goode

The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss a conceptual model of purchase intentions, trust, and e‐servicescape that presents online physical environments as…

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18219

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss a conceptual model of purchase intentions, trust, and e‐servicescape that presents online physical environments as comprising three dimensions. It aims to develop and extend existing research into physical service environments through proposing, operationalizing, and testing a model of online servicescape.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilizes a survey approach to gather data regarding consumers' perceptions of online servicescape. Surveys were administered to 257 respondents regarding a broad range of web sites.

Findings

A measure of e‐servicescape is evaluated that comprises three dimensions and 52 items while relationships between the dimensions of e‐servicescape, trust, and purchase intentions are described.

Research limitations/implications

The first contribution of this study stems from the successful operationalization of a comprehensive multi‐item (in total 52 items), multi‐scale (nine scales), multi‐dimensional (three) measure of e‐servicescape. Second, a contribution is made through the finding that trust constitutes a key variable during online exchange. Third, we contribute insights into the antecedents of consumers' purchase intentions. Finally, the study reveals that consumers' interpretations of online environments exert a powerful influence over trust and purchase intentions.

Originality/value

The findings of this study also have numerous implications for both services managers and internet developers. The findings supply valuable insights into which factors practitioners should focus their attention to better tailor their approaches. This study strongly endorses the view that the loyalty intentions of online customers are linked to the extent to which they trust the service provider.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Lloyd C. Harris and Kate Daunt

In this study the authors aim to explore the impact of customer misbehavior on frontline employees and managers and to elucidate the management tactics and strategies that…

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8150

Abstract

Purpose

In this study the authors aim to explore the impact of customer misbehavior on frontline employees and managers and to elucidate the management tactics and strategies that managers employ in an attempt to minimize the impact of customer misbehavior on the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a discussion of the research design and methodology employed, the findings of 88 in-depth interviews are presented.

Findings

These data suggest that customer misbehavior impacts on frontline employees, managers, and managerial strategies. Three main effects of customer misbehavior on customer-contact employees are uncovered: physiological, cognitive, and attitudinal. These are connected with four main management challenges: conflicting pressures, recruitment and retention, counseling and motivation, and time expenditure. Finally, data analysis finds evidence of six main ways in which managers attempted to reduce or to alleviate harmful customer misbehavior: selective recruitment, changes to training and induction procedures, enhanced rewards, work-team design, increase counseling, and alterations to the servicescape.

Practical implications

The authors recommend that practitioners undertake a misbehavior audit that explores not only the extent of customer misbehavior but also the mechanisms, systems, and procedures the organization has for identifying, recording, and attempting to minimize the effects of dysfunctional customer behavior.

Originality/value

This study contributes insights into how customer-contact personnel and managers are both affected and cope with customer misbehavior. These insights are helpful for service managers faced with customer misbehavior and academicians interested in how employees respond to contemporary customers.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Lloyd C. Harris and Emmanuel Ogbonna

There has been considerable research into the barriers to the development of market orientation. However, whilst researchers have alluded to the importance of top…

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18097

Abstract

There has been considerable research into the barriers to the development of market orientation. However, whilst researchers have alluded to the importance of top management knowledge, skills and commitment, the issues of leadership style has been largely overlooked. This lacuna in marketing theory is despite numerous indirect references to the importance of leaders in developing a market oriented culture. The objective of this study is to explore and describe the role of top management leadership style in influencing the process of market orientation development. Begins with a review of existing definitions of and perspectives on the content and components of market orientation. Thereafter extant research into the barriers and processes of market orientation are examined and critically appraised. Following a discussion of the research methodology adopted, the findings of a survey of leadership style and market orientation are presented. Concludes with a discussion of the implications of this study for theory and practice, highlighting the importance of this avenue of research.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 35 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Lloyd C. Harris and Emmanuel Ogbonna

A theme emerging from research into the determinants, content and consequences of market orientation is that developing a market‐oriented culture exerts a profound…

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4171

Abstract

A theme emerging from research into the determinants, content and consequences of market orientation is that developing a market‐oriented culture exerts a profound influence on the organizational culture of a company. Explores and describes the manner and forms of front‐line employees’ responses to market‐oriented culture change initiatives. The paper begins with a brief overview of existing literature discussing the definition and components of a market orientation. Thereafter, extant research into the consequences of developing a market‐oriented culture is reviewed critically. After detailing the research design and methodology adopted in this study, the summary findings of two in‐depth case studies are presented. The findings indicate that front‐line employees respond differentially to market‐oriented culture change programmes. Concludes with a series of implications for both marketing and culture theorists and practitioners.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 34 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Lloyd C. Harris

In an era in which two‐thirds of interactions between firms and customers occur by telephone communications, the impact of customer telephone rage on employees'…

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2363

Abstract

Purpose

In an era in which two‐thirds of interactions between firms and customers occur by telephone communications, the impact of customer telephone rage on employees' service‐related attitudes and beliefs is worthy of study. Telephone or “phone rage” involves occurrences of employee‐ or firm‐oriented injurious speech, aggression, anger, or antagonism that customers undertake during customer‐firm telephone interactions. The aim of this paper is to develop a conceptual model of the direct and indirect links between perceived customer phone rage and employee‐customer rapport, functional quality delivery, customer service orientation, retaliation intentions, negative word of mouth, and affective commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the developed hypotheses, the author deemed a self‐administered postal survey the most appropriate data collection method. In total, 257 fully completed questionnaires were received and analyzed via structural equation modeling.

Findings

Of the eight hypothesized associations between phone rage and employee–customer rapport, functional quality delivery, customer service orientation, retaliation intentions, negative word of mouth, and affective commitment, seven are found to be significant. Three previously accepted associations are also found to be significant.

Originality/value

This study contributes in a number of ways. First, the paper develops a conceptual model that depicts service‐related dynamics, perceived customer rage, and employees' behavioral intentions. Second, this study also contributes methodologically through operationalizing, pretesting, applying, and testing a seven‐item scale of the level of perceived customer phone rage, from the perspective of the recipient (the employee). The third contribution of the study centers on the empirical insights gained. The study provides empirical evidence in support of the wider application of Huefner and Hunt's extension of Hirschman's framework.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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