Search results

1 – 10 of 12
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Liz McDowell, Linda Banwell and Gwen Marples

The paper aims to present some points for discussion around issues in qualitative evaluation to do with access to sites and individuals, and relationships between the…

1087

Abstract

The paper aims to present some points for discussion around issues in qualitative evaluation to do with access to sites and individuals, and relationships between the researcher/evaluator and participants. It is based on evidence from three projects in which the authors are, or have recently been, involved: JUBILEE (about monitoring and evaluating user behaviour in information seeking), EASE‐IT (about the encouragement of innovative teaching in engineering), and Virtual Gallery (a small scale local case study of a one semester option on a history of art course). The projects have encountered similar problems in relation to the collection of first hand qualitative data, and have relevance for the whole area of performance measurement in library and information studies, which is increasingly needing to also collect qualitative data as part of the evaluation of both projects and services.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

Susan Scoffield

This paper is an account of the proceedings of an Internet conference which was sponsored by Education + Training. The conference identified a number of issues and questions…

869

Abstract

This paper is an account of the proceedings of an Internet conference which was sponsored by Education + Training. The conference identified a number of issues and questions arising from the increasingly complex environment of Higher Education. The changing characteristics of the relationship between the providers of Higher Education and its various customer markets and publics are discussed in the proceedings. Views, opinions and examples of responses to change were shared during the conference.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1986

TONY WARSHAW

Pamela Graddon recently left BLRDD, having been promoted to head of the Industrial Property Section in the British Library's Science Reference and Information Service (SRIS). Her…

Abstract

Pamela Graddon recently left BLRDD, having been promoted to head of the Industrial Property Section in the British Library's Science Reference and Information Service (SRIS). Her responsibilities in BLRDD for information technology are now being dealt with by Derek Greenwood who previously workedin the SRIS. Dr Elizabeth Dron, who joined BLRDD earlier this year, has left the British Library on promotion to take up a post in the Department of Environment.

Details

New Library World, vol. 87 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

NEIL BOWYER

What is Electronic Publishing? Electronic Publishing (EP) is the application of communications technology to distribute information. In the context of libraries, it typically…

Abstract

What is Electronic Publishing? Electronic Publishing (EP) is the application of communications technology to distribute information. In the context of libraries, it typically means large, often textual databases, stored on powerful computers, from which information is selectively retrieved using terminals linked to the computers via the telephone system.

Details

New Library World, vol. 86 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Hannelore B. Rader

The following is an annotated list of materials dealing with orientation to library facilities and services, instruction in the use of information resources, and research and…

Abstract

The following is an annotated list of materials dealing with orientation to library facilities and services, instruction in the use of information resources, and research and computer skills related to retrieving, using, and evaluating information. This review, the sixteenth to be published in Reference Services Review, includes items in English published in 1989. A few are not annotated because the compiler could not obtain copies of them for this review.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Martin Quinn and Liz Warren

The purpose of this paper is to explore, if, similar to other management initiatives, new public management may be a repackaging of already existent concepts. Emerging in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore, if, similar to other management initiatives, new public management may be a repackaging of already existent concepts. Emerging in the 1970s and 1980s as an innovative way to manage public sector elements, new public management affected both the ownership and management of public sector companies, services and utilities. Minimal research has been undertaken previously, using historic archival sources of public entities, to explore if elements of the concept originated prior to the 1970s.

Design/methodology/approach

This research draws on archival records from a publicly owned electricity company, covering about three decades from 1946, during which a large investment project was undertaken by the company. This study draws on key tenets of what is today called new public management, examining prior research to ascertain if similar elements were present in the case organisation.

Findings

When reviewing the progress of the investment project, many of the key elements of new public management emerged, even during the early part of the project.

Originality/value

There is little historical research on the origins of new public management, and the findings here suggest that it may not be entirely new. While this does not at all invalidate existing research, it suggests that new public management may be to an extent a repackaging of previously extant techniques. This opens up possibilities for future historic research in terms of how and why it was repackaged, and also what was/was not repackaged.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Liz McDonnell, Lesley Murray, Tamsin Hinton-Smith and Nuno Ferreira

‘Living together apart’ (LTA) is the practice of remaining in close domestic proximity following the ending of an intimate relationship. Using the conceptual framework of families…

Abstract

‘Living together apart’ (LTA) is the practice of remaining in close domestic proximity following the ending of an intimate relationship. Using the conceptual framework of families in motion, in which families are re-envisioned as in flow, responding to all kinds of disruptions, chosen and unchosen, by ‘holding on’, adapting, adjusting and redirecting, this chapter explores the family practices involved in LTA. Using collaborative autoethnography – a research process in which the authors jointly explored data from their own lives – the authors were able to develop an understanding of LTA that was attentive to everyday life and the interconnections of time and space within families. The authors found that when families are living within less normative constellations, there are fewer scripts to rely upon and the potential for non-legitimacy and anxiety increases. The data also showed how deeply families are embedded in practices that are always in relation to an experienced past and imagined future. The importance of having a family story to tell that ‘works’ socially and emotionally, as well as having a home that can spatially encompass such new flows in family lives, is crucial.

Details

Families in Motion: Ebbing and Flowing through Space and Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-416-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2020

Liz Hassad de Andrade, Jorge Junio Moreira Antunes and Peter Wanke

The aim of this paper is to provide an approach to analyze the performance of TV programs and to identify what can be done to improve them.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to provide an approach to analyze the performance of TV programs and to identify what can be done to improve them.

Design/methodology/approach

The Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS), the Ng-model, Grey relational analysis (GRA), and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to evaluate the programs, using audience, share, and duration as the performance criteria.

Findings

By comparing TOPSIS to the Ng-model, PCA, and GRA, we verified that SVD and bootstrap SVD TOPSIS provide a good balance between equal-weights TOPSIS and the other models. This is because SVD and bootstrap SVD TOPSIS break down the data to a higher degree, but are less impacted by outliers compared to the long tail models.

Practical implications

To determine which TV programs should be replaced or modified is a complex decision that has not been addressed in the literature. The advantage of using a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) approach is that analysts can choose as many criteria as they want to rank TV programs, rather than relying on a single criterion (e.g., audience, share, target rating point).

Originality/value

This work represents the first time that robust MCDM methodology is applied to an audience data set to analyze the performance of TV programs and to identify what can be done to improve them. This study shows the application of a detailed methodology that is useful for the improvement of TV programs and other entertainment industry content.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Helen Edwards, Mary Courtney and Maria O'Reilly

This article describes a research study conducted in Brisbane, Australia, that sought to establish older people's views on what contributes to their quality of life in residential…

Abstract

This article describes a research study conducted in Brisbane, Australia, that sought to establish older people's views on what contributes to their quality of life in residential settings. Focus group interviews were used to explore the key aspects of residential life that equated with a high‐quality experience. A number of key themes were identified, particularly relating to issues about autonomy, control and staff‐resident interactions. The article concludes with recommendations for those working in, or providing, residential care.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2018

Corina Sheerin and Caitriona Hughes

This research aims to explore the role of social capital and specifically networks in role, and career development for women within two very distinct gender-segregated contexts of…

1087

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to explore the role of social capital and specifically networks in role, and career development for women within two very distinct gender-segregated contexts of the labour market, namely, investment management and human resource management (HRM).

Design/methodology/approach

This research is qualitative in nature, underpinned by an interpretivist philosophical stance. Thematic analysis is used to analyse the findings from 32 in-depth interviews with HR and investment management managers.

Findings

The findings advance our understanding of social capital and its development as a social process, which differs according to labour market contexts. The results indicate divergence among participants regarding how they access networks as well as the perceived role and benefits of networking and social capital accumulation in their career and personal development.

Practical implications

For human resource development (HRD) practitioners, there are implications in relation to the need to tailor development and support structures cognisant of the occupational context. Specifically, the findings of this study indicate the acute need to support network access for those “outsider” women in male-dominated spaces. A need to enhance awareness of the benefits of networks to both organisations and employees across the labour market is warranted. For organisations, networks underlie social capital accumulation, which in turn increases efficiency and generates business solutions. For the employee, networks are an important self-development and career advancement tool. Such connections need to be supported and developed. Within patriarchal spaces particularly, HRD professionals need to provide support to women in extending their networks both within and outside the organisation.

Originality/value

This research makes an essential contribution to the literature by examining the influence of context in the development of social capital within two polarized labour market locations. The findings highlight the difficulties women face when developing social capital in investment management in contrast to the relative ease, which HRM professionals experience. Such findings also bring to light the essential role of HRD professionals as advocates for change in such contexts.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 42 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

1 – 10 of 12