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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Ailsa Cameron, Eleanor K. Johnson, Paul B. Willis, Liz Lloyd and Randall Smith

This paper aims to report the findings of a study that explores the contribution volunteers make to social care for older adults, identifying lessons for the social care…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report the findings of a study that explores the contribution volunteers make to social care for older adults, identifying lessons for the social care sector and policymakers.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory multiple case study design was used to capture the perspectives and experiences of managers of services, volunteer co-ordinators, volunteers, paid care staff and older people. Seven diverse social care organisations took part in the study drawn from three locations in the South West of England.

Findings

This study identified three distinct models of volunteer contribution to social care services for older people. Although the contributions made by volunteers to services are valued, the study drew attention to some of the challenges related to their involvement.

Research limitations/implications

The organisations taking part in this small-scale study were all based in the South West of England, and the findings are therefore not generalisable but contribute to the growing evidence base related to this important field.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates the importance of the volunteer co-ordinator role and suggests that it is properly funded and resourced. It also confirms the importance of volunteers receiving appropriate training and support.

Originality/value

Given the increasing involvement of volunteers in the provision of social care, this paper provides lessons to ensure the role of volunteers in social care enhances rather than diminishes the quality of care provided.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Randall Smith, Robin Darton, Ailsa Cameron, Eleanor K. Johnson, Liz Lloyd, Simon Evans, Teresa June Atkinson and Jeremy Porteus

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the process of commissioning adult social care services in England. It reflects the literature on commissioning at…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the process of commissioning adult social care services in England. It reflects the literature on commissioning at the strategic level followed by a section on operational or micro-commissioning. The rest of the paper focusses on the emergence of ideas about outcomes-based commissioning (OBC) in the field of adult social care and ends with critical consideration of the effectiveness of OBC in adult social care as applied to support and care provided in extra care housing.

Design/methodology/approach

The review of strategic and operational commissioning in adult social care in England (and Scotland in brief) is based on both policy documents and a review of the literature, as are the sources addressing OBC in adult social care particularly in extra care housing settings.

Findings

The core of this paper focusses on the challenges to the implementation of OBC in adult social care in the context of provision for residents in extra care housing. Of central importance are the impact of the squeeze on funding, increasing costs as a result of demographic change and the introduction of a national living wage plus the focus on the needs of service users through the idea of person-centred care and resistance to change on the part of adult social care staff and workers in other relevant settings.

Originality/value

Addressing the implementation of OBC in adult social care in England in the context of extra care housing.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Liz Lloyd and Ailsa Cameron

A better understanding of experiences of the end of life in old age is important for practitioners, but there are considerable methodological and ethical challenges to…

Abstract

A better understanding of experiences of the end of life in old age is important for practitioners, but there are considerable methodological and ethical challenges to research in this area. An interdisciplinary team at the University of Bristol conducted a pilot study of 100 people aged over 80, over the course of a year. The study focused on significant events in the lives of participants, the vast majority of whom were living ordinary lives in the community. Data were gathered from participants and their relatives and, where relevant, from health and social care professionals. In this paper key findings are presented and the implications for research and practice considered.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Liz Lloyd, Albert Banerjee, Charlene Harrington, Frode F. Jacobsen and Marta Szebehely

– This study aims to explore the causes and consequences of media scandals involving nursing homes for older persons in Canada, Norway, Sweden, the UK and the USA.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the causes and consequences of media scandals involving nursing homes for older persons in Canada, Norway, Sweden, the UK and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a descriptive case-study methodology which provides an in-depth, focused, qualitative analysis of one selected nursing home scandal in each jurisdiction. Scandals were selected on the basis of being substantive enough to potentially affect policy. An international comparative perspective was adopted to consider whether and how different social, political and economic contexts might shape scandals and their consequences.

Findings

This study found that for-profit residential care provision as well as international trends in the ownership and financing of nursing homes were factors in the emergence of all media scandals, as was investigative reporting and a lack of consensus around the role of the state in the delivery of residential care. All scandals resulted in government action but such action generally avoided addressing underlying structural conditions.

Research limitations/implications

This study examines only the short-term effects of five media scandals.

Originality/value

While there has been longstanding recognition of the importance of scandals to the development of residential care policy, there have been few studies that have systematically examined the causes and consequences of such scandals. This paper contributes to a research agenda that more fully considers the media's role in the development of residential care policy, attending to both its promises and shortcomings.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 34 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Di Bailey

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Mustafa F. Özbilgin

Abstract

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2013

Randall Smith

The purpose of this paper is to trace the history of official policy on the regulation of care homes in respect of end of life care and to contrast this with the results…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to trace the history of official policy on the regulation of care homes in respect of end of life care and to contrast this with the results of research on this important theme, not least in terms of what is required to support care home staff in relation to dying residents and their relatives. A central concern is to argue for the open recognition that care homes now cater primarily for frail people towards the end of their lives. Good end of life care and a good death could become a positive “selling point”. The author concludes that the system of regulation has broadly failed to address a good death or good end of life care in a residential home. Death talk should no longer need to be avoided in care homes. The research suggests that appropriate support for care home staff in relation to dying residents needs careful identification and investment. A cultural shift is required.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a review of policy documents on regulation and standards of care in residential homes and a subsequent review of the research literature on death and dying in care homes, the paper illuminates the contrast between the ambitious aims in policy documents with very varied practice in everyday care of frail residents.

Findings

The recent systems of regulation have broadly failed to address a good death or good end of life care in residential homes. Open acknowledgement of death and dying should not be avoided in care homes. Appropriate support for care home staff in relation to dying residents needs careful identification and investment.

Originality/value

The focus of this paper is to contrast official policy with everyday practice. Whilst policy documents suggest recognition of the importance of dignity and respect from dying residents, the research literature indicates great variation in the practice of everyday care.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Liz King

Since the merger of Lloyds and TSB banks in 1995/96, the number of operational staff working within the company has increased two‐fold, paving the way for Lloyds TSB to…

Abstract

Since the merger of Lloyds and TSB banks in 1995/96, the number of operational staff working within the company has increased two‐fold, paving the way for Lloyds TSB to develop a new company training, programmes, aimed specifically at operational and support staff.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Marjorie Lloyd, Liz Lefroy, Stephen Yorke and Richard Mottershead

It is generally agreed that carers in mental health care play a vital role in helping people to maintain their place in the community and reducing the time clients spend…

Abstract

Purpose

It is generally agreed that carers in mental health care play a vital role in helping people to maintain their place in the community and reducing the time clients spend in hospital or residential settings. The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual approach to involving carers in higher education by acknowledging their contribution to improving practice and identify the impact upon student learning in mental health and social care professions.

Design/methodology/approach

A brief review of the policy and literature on involving carers in mental health services and education explored the historical and current influences upon practice. This was then applied to the experience of the authors when teaching nursing and social work students in a higher educational setting and evaluated as developing outcomes in carer involvement practice.

Findings

Relationships between carers and students in health and social care may be created in higher education settings that can develop supportive, informative and recovery‐focused care in practice. Creating such relationships in the higher educational setting helps students to prepare for developing relationships with carers in practice.

Originality/value

Involving carers in education may improve outcomes in recovery for the client and carer experience and the development of professional and self awareness skills in students. Developing involvement practices in higher education begins the process early in the experience of health and social care students, providing a safe environment in which to master such skills.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Gareth O'Rourke

The purpose of this paper is to build upon existing knowledge of personalisation through an improved understanding of how the use of personalised social care services can…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build upon existing knowledge of personalisation through an improved understanding of how the use of personalised social care services can support older people’s sense of self. It contains perspectives that are helpful to the development of personalisation policy and practice and to the future commissioning of social care services.

Design/methodology/approach

The research involved a qualitative study with eight participants in two local authority areas in England. A series of three in-depth interviews conducted with each participant over a four to six week period explored their experience of using (in one case refusing) a direct payment to meet their social care needs. Ethical approval was obtained prior to the start of fieldwork via the research ethics committee of the author’s home university.

Findings

Two inter-related themes emerge as findings of the research. First, that the locus of personalisation resides within the interpersonal dynamics of helping relationships; participants experienced personalisation when carers helped to meet needs in ways that validated their narrative of self. Second, whilst the experience of personalisation is not strongly related to consumer choice, it is important that older people are able to exercise control over and within helping relationships.

Research limitations/implications

This is a small scale qualitative study conducted with only eight participants. Whilst it offers valid insights into what constitutes personalisation and the processes by which it was achieved for the participants, caution is required in applying the findings more generally. With the exception of one case, the study is focused exclusively on first person accounts of older people. Future studies might usefully be designed to incorporate the accounts of other involved parties such as family members and paid carers.

Originality/value

The paper provides an alternative way of approaching personalisation of social care services for older people by exploring it in terms of its impact on self. It identifies the development of accommodations of “special requirements of Self” in helping relationships as a key mechanism of personalisation. This offers a balance to the current focus on consumer choice and control through the development of market like mechanisms.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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