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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1996

Tom Bourner, Liz Beaty, John Lawson and Suzanne O’Hara

Questions where and for whom action learning might not work and seeks to find the limits of the method. Suggests that by better understanding the situations in which…

1458

Abstract

Questions where and for whom action learning might not work and seeks to find the limits of the method. Suggests that by better understanding the situations in which action learning works least well, its more effective use will be more fully understood.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Tom Bourner, Paul Frost and Liz Beaty

Identifies the incidence of research degrees in business studiesand management compared with other subjects. Explores the role of theresearch degree within management and…

Abstract

Identifies the incidence of research degrees in business studies and management compared with other subjects. Explores the role of the research degree within management and, highlighting changes over the past two decades, advocates the research degree as a powerful vehicle for management development.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

John Lawson, Liz Beaty, Tom Bourner and Suzanne O’ Hara

The last in a series of four articles that seeks to answer questions about the domains of applicability of action learning. Aims to reach some conclusions about where and…

509

Abstract

The last in a series of four articles that seeks to answer questions about the domains of applicability of action learning. Aims to reach some conclusions about where and when action learning is most appropriate. The authors reflect on their own experience as action learning participants and set advisers to identify the conditions which best support action learning. Offers suggestions for those people who may be considering setting up action learning sets within their own organization. Concludes that action learning works best when the prevailing organizational culture is congruent with that of the action learning sets.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Liz Beaty John Lawson Tom Bourner and Suzanne O’Hara

The third in a series of four articles that seeks to answer questions about the applicability of action learning. Aims to look at what can be learned using action…

758

Abstract

The third in a series of four articles that seeks to answer questions about the applicability of action learning. Aims to look at what can be learned using action learning; and seeks to identify what can be best learned by action learning and what is best learned by other methods. Concludes that action learning is most likely to produce learning that is personal, situational and emergent. It is less likely to be learning that can be closely specified in advance or is skill based. Action learning is most valuable for higher level professional development (i.e. developing excellence) and less useful for the development of foundation skills (i.e. developing competence) where instruction and training remain more important.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Suzanne O’Hara, Liz Beaty, John Lawson and Tom Bourner

Examines recent changes in further education colleges and colleges’ greater responsiveness to the needs of employers and students. Explores the development of a model of…

639

Abstract

Examines recent changes in further education colleges and colleges’ greater responsiveness to the needs of employers and students. Explores the development of a model of responsiveness, the main ways in which responsiveness is changing and future directions for colleges. Concludes that colleges’ responsiveness to employer needs will continue to be influenced by financial and commercial decisions, and the needs of wider communities.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 April 2014

Peter Kandlbinder

This chapter explores the theorising practices of successful researchers in higher education. The biographical case studies use teaching and learning as their focus to…

Abstract

This chapter explores the theorising practices of successful researchers in higher education. The biographical case studies use teaching and learning as their focus to provide four succinct accounts of how the researcher’s thinking around their signature concepts evolved over time. They analyse the narrative that surrounds these signature concepts to understand what successful researchers do with their ideas to maximise their symbolic capital in the higher education research field. The researcher’s experiences of theorising highlight the contextual factors that have influenced them as they tried to explain how they achieved the outcomes of their research. The chapter concludes with an overview of the beneficial strategies used in these four cases, so potential researchers can appreciate the approaches to theorising that are compatible with higher education research traditions.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research II
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-823-5

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

19

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Karen Gillett, Liz Reed and Liz Bryan

The purpose of this paper is to describe the delivery of facilitated action learning sets as an integral component of a multidisciplinary end-of-life care course.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the delivery of facilitated action learning sets as an integral component of a multidisciplinary end-of-life care course.

Design/methodology/approach

The educational intervention described in this paper is delivered by specialist palliative care practitioners to those working with dying patients and their families in non-specialist settings. The programme consists of two components: the first taught/experience-based component takes place in a hospice. The second integral component involves action learning sets which are facilitated by specialist palliative care staff over a six-month period. This paper reports the challenges, learning and benefits of using action learning sets to improve end-of-life care.

Findings

Action learning sets provide support which enables staff to implement changes to end-of-life care. Participants in the successful action learning sets were motivated to change practice and identified themselves as change agents. Management support was vital to allow participants the authority to implement changes to practice.

Practical implications

Facilitators need to gain participant and management commitment to the action learning process before the programme begins if they are to be successful in achieving changes to end-of-life care.

Originality/value

Hospices and other health care organisations work in partnership to deliver this programme, and this paper demonstrates how action learning sets can increase mutual understanding and communication between specialist and non-specialist end-of-life care settings.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 1 May 2010

LeAnn Beaty

For 28 years Alaska, like the vast majority of the nation, has struggled with growing prison populations and shrinking budgets. In 1995, the Alaska Department of…

Abstract

For 28 years Alaska, like the vast majority of the nation, has struggled with growing prison populations and shrinking budgets. In 1995, the Alaska Department of Corrections, faced with sanctions unless they ameliorated their crowded prison conditions, looked to the popular practice of contracting out its correctional operations by sending 650 prisoners to a private out-of-state prison. But, as the costs of prisoner litigation and transportation mounted, the state began to consider building its own private prison, a decision which many state lawmakers and business entrepreneurs argued would allow the state to stretch scarce dollars by providing cheaper and better quality prisons, return millions of dollars to the state economy, and create permanent jobs. In this decision case, students are required to put themselves in the role of the Alaska Legislature to determine whether they should permit the building and operation of a private prison in one of Alaska's remote communities. The students must analyze and juggle the complex and often competing set of objectives, values, and political tensions intrinsic to all privatization decisions.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2022

Wen-Hwa Ko and Min-Yen Lu

This study aims to examine Taiwanese hospitality students’ self-reported professional competence in surplus food management and assess the usefulness of their university…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine Taiwanese hospitality students’ self-reported professional competence in surplus food management and assess the usefulness of their university training in this area. Using the importance-performance analysis (IPA) method, it is possible to obtain a clearer understanding of the priority order of the items that require improvement and to identify which surplus food management competence items should be strengthened in the school curriculum and which items should be enhanced by the students.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used the questionnaire survey method. It evaluated seven dimensions covering 29 items related to surplus food management competencies of the kitchen staff. The evaluation was done using IPA to determine the relationship between professional competence (performance level) and courses provided (importance level). The factor coordinates were completed according to the means of personal qualifications and courses provided.

Findings

According to students’ self-assessment, the dimensions of “Personal moral attitude,” “Food handling attitude,” “Education and training attitude” and “Culinary knowledge” were located in the “Keep up the good work” quadrant, meaning that the students think that their surplus food management competence is relatively high and the courses provided are sufficient. Thus, these items have better performance at the present and they hope to maintain the status. However, “Menu analysis” and “Sanitation knowledge” were found to have low importance and low level of performance. Therefore, these two dimensions require attention in the course design and educational training.

Research limitations/implications

The questionnaire responses were self-reported; this study assumed that all participants answered honestly. Future studies may include additional factors in the analysis, such as hospitality management, culinary skills, internship experience and work time that may affect the perceptions of students. Moreover, professional chefs could be surveyed to determine their professional competence and training needs.

Originality/value

The professional training that students receive determines, to a large extent, their performance in their jobs and the resulting stability of their employment. Therefore, improved competence gained through good-quality training can help students meet the demands of the hospitality industry.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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