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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Tahira Probst, Alina Chizh, Sanman Hu, Lixin Jiang and Christopher Austin

Despite a large body of literature on the negative consequences of job insecurity, one outcome – job creativity – has received relatively scant attention. While initial…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite a large body of literature on the negative consequences of job insecurity, one outcome – job creativity – has received relatively scant attention. While initial studies established a relationship between job insecurity and creativity, the explanatory mechanisms for this relationship have yet to be fully explored. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Using threat-rigidity theory and broaden-and-build theory as a conceptual foundation, the authors implemented a two-country temporally lagged research design (the USA (n = 390); China (n = 346)) to test two potential mediating mechanisms – cognitive failures and positive job-related affect – as explanatory variables between quantitative and qualitative forms of job insecurity and self- and other-rated measures of creative performance.

Findings

Results from both countries suggest that job-related affective well-being and employee cognitive failures both explained the relationship between job insecurity and creative performance. However, affective well-being was a better explanatory variable for the relation between job insecurity and self-rated creative performance, whereas cognitive failures better accounted for the relationship between job insecurity and performance on an idea generation task.

Research limitations/implications

The authors discuss the implications of these findings from measurement, theoretical and practical perspectives.

Originality/value

The authors extend prior research on the relationship between job insecurity and creativity by: considering both quantitative and qualitative job insecurity, examining their relationships with both self- and other-rated assessments of creative job performance, and testing cognitive and affective mediating mechanisms explaining these relationships.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2019

Tahira M. Probst, Lixin Jiang and Sergio Andrés López Bohle

The purpose of this paper is to test competing models of the relationship between job insecurity and two forms of impression management (self- and supervisor-focused) on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test competing models of the relationship between job insecurity and two forms of impression management (self- and supervisor-focused) on job performance. Specifically, does job insecurity lead to greater subsequent impression management; or, does preventative use of impression management subsequently lead to reductions in job insecurity? Additionally, how do these both relate to in-role performance?

Design/methodology/approach

Using two-wave survey data collected from 184 working adults in the USA and the two-step approach recommended by Cole and Maxwell (2003) and Taris and Kompier (2006), the authors tested cross-lagged relationship between job insecurity and both forms of impression management by comparing four different models: a stability model, a normal causation model (with cross-lagged paths from T1 job insecurity to T2 impression management), a reversed causation model (with cross-lagged paths from T1 impression management to T2 job insecurity) and a reciprocal causation model (with all cross-lagged paths described in the normal and reversed causation model).

Findings

Results were supportive of the reversed causation model which indicated that greater use of supervisor-focused impression management at Time 1 predicted lower levels of job insecurity at Time 2 (after controlling for prior levels of job insecurity); moreover, job insecurity at Time 1 was then significantly associated with more positive in-role behaviors at Time 2. Moreover, the test of the indirect effect between T1 impression management and T2 performance was significant.

Originality/value

These results suggest that impression management clearly plays an important role in understanding the relationship between job insecurity and job performance. However, employees appear to utilize impression management as a means of pre-emptively enhancing their job security, rather than as a tool to reactively cope with perceived job insecurity.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Abstract

Details

The Aging Workforce Handbook
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-448-8

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2016

Abstract

Details

The Aging Workforce Handbook
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-448-8

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Wanxing Jiang, Ji Li, Haifeng Yan, Hao Li and Mengyuan Chen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether, when and how customer orientation may contribute to success in introduction of new products (SINP).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether, when and how customer orientation may contribute to success in introduction of new products (SINP).

Design/methodology/approach

With a multi-phase and multi-source data collection approach, this study tested the proposed theoretical model by applying multiple regression with SPSS Process Macro.

Findings

Customer orientation positively influences cross-functional integration (CFI), which in turn facilitates SINP; a firm’s new product introduction (NPI) strategy moderates customer orientation–CFI link.

Originality/value

This study empirically tests whether, why and when customer orientation may contribute to SINP. By suggesting the important role of customer orientation in improving SINP, the mediating effect of CFI and the moderating effect of NPI strategy, the current study should enrich the extant literature on customer orientation, CFI and NPI.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2019

Junli Yu, Shelagh M.R. Campbell, Jing Li and Zhou Zhang

The Chief Financial Officer (CFO), despite being a critical organization member responsible for ensuring quality of financial reporting, audit and compliance, is…

Abstract

Purpose

The Chief Financial Officer (CFO), despite being a critical organization member responsible for ensuring quality of financial reporting, audit and compliance, is under-researched. Grouped as a member of top management teams (TMS) in studies, factors influencing decision making in this group rely on static measures of characteristics without regard for dynamic and longitudinal influences of career trajectories and industry occupational group memberships. The relationship between the high-tech industry as a site of notable reported internal control (IC) weakness and influences on CFOs requires closer examination. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws together the upper echelons theory and occupational communities (OCs) to explore the impact of shared values and behavioral norms from different sources on executive decision making. Internal and external sources of OC are proposed and their influence on activities with respect to corporate IC is tested. The sample of 1,573 firm/year observations includes high-tech firms listed on major US exchanges was developed using data from five distinct databases. Executives’ biographic information was manually collected.

Findings

Results indicate that senior financial executives belong not only to their firm and its culture but also to OCs that extend beyond the firm. Membership in professional credential granting occupational groups has less impact on effective IC than experience in the high-tech industry. In combination, multiple OCs show evidence of compound and counteracting effects on IC. The OC that arises in the high-tech industry makes a measurable positive difference in the quality of IC in sample firms, in contrast with the OC among credentialed accounting and financial professionals.

Research limitations/implications

This quantitative study of OC reveals the differential impact of different sources of OC and contributes to the literature on TMS a new framework for examining decision making. OC is typically studied through qualitative methods and, thus, potential exists to further explore the specific nature and dynamics of the OCs identified in this study.

Practical implications

The study highlights the role of broad affiliations and networks among senior financial executives which may have bearing on their ability to effectively manage IC. The role of these networks may also partially explain instances of CFO failure and thus dismissal. Knowledge of the role of OC may help boards of directors in the selection and promotion of senior financial officers of the firm.

Originality/value

The paper offers a different perspective on professional accounting expertise in one specific industry where incidence of IC weakness is high relative to other industries. Study results expand recent research on TMS to include sociological impacts of cohort groups. Despite generally weaker IC in the high-tech sector, this study demonstrates the value of exploring group membership within the industry as an important predictor of behavior. The result is a new perspective to CFO decision making which illustrates the relevance of OCs among upper echelons. The implications of findings for CFO recruitment and promotion are borne out in recent instances of senior financial executive failure in the sector.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Xiaochao Xian, Chenglong Nai, Lixin Li and Shuo Zhao

Immersion is one of the key steps during the preparation of silane-based hybrid films, which has important effects on the performance of films after curing. In this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Immersion is one of the key steps during the preparation of silane-based hybrid films, which has important effects on the performance of films after curing. In this paper, the formation process of Zr-doped silane film (i.e. the adsorption of silane and deposition of zirconium compounds) on carbon steel immersed in Zr(NO3)4/silane mixed solutions was investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The method of in situ monitoring the open circuit potential of a two-electrode system, consisting of carbon steel and saturated calomel electrode, was used. The effects of immersion conditions (i.e. the concentration of Zr(NO3)4 and pH of Zr(NO3)4/silane mixed solution) on the open circuit potential were investigated in detail. Furthermore, the surface coverage rate of different cured films (i.e. Zr cured film, silane cured film and Zr/silane composite cured film) after curing on carbon steel was calculated according to the results of polarization curves. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to study the self-healing property of Zr-doped silane cured film.

Findings

The results indicate that in Zr(NO3)4/silane mixed solutions, most zirconium compounds deposit on the surface of carbon steel at the initial immersing stage, then the adsorption of silane on the residual surface of carbon steel dominates the following immersing stage. EIS results show that the Zr-doped cured film has improved self-healing property.

Originality/value

First, the method of in situ monitoring the open-circuit potential of two-electrode system was applied to investigate the deposition of Zr and the adsorption of silane on carbon steel immersed in Zr(NO3)4/silane mixed solutions. Second, the formation process of Zr-doped silane film was proposed.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 64 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Hesheng Tang, Dawei Li, Lixin Deng and Songtao Xue

This paper aims to develop a comprehensive uncertainty quantification method using evidence theory for Park–Ang damage index-based performance design in which epistemic…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a comprehensive uncertainty quantification method using evidence theory for Park–Ang damage index-based performance design in which epistemic uncertainties are considered. Various sources of uncertainty emanating from the database of the cyclic test results of RC members provided by the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center are taken into account.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, an uncertainty quantification methodology based on evidence theory is presented for the whole process of performance-based seismic design (PBSD), while considering uncertainty in the Park–Ang damage model. To alleviate the burden of high computational cost in propagating uncertainty, the differential evolution interval optimization strategy is used for efficiently finding the propagated belief structure throughout the whole design process.

Findings

The investigation results of this paper demonstrate that the uncertainty rooted in Park–Ang damage model have a significant influence on PBSD design and evaluation. It might be worth noting that the epistemic uncertainty present in the Park–Ang damage model needs to be considered to avoid underestimating the true uncertainty.

Originality/value

This paper presents an evidence theory-based uncertainty quantification framework for the whole process of PBSD.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2019

Dong Xiaozhou

The purpose of this paper is to initially use a stochastic model to fit data of customer behavior stickiness and customer value, then estimate the corresponding parameters…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to initially use a stochastic model to fit data of customer behavior stickiness and customer value, then estimate the corresponding parameters and use Bayesian rule to calculate its mathematical expectation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use expectations of customer behavior stickiness as an independent variable, expectations of customer value as a dependent variable, motivations of consumption as moderator and conduct regression analysis to research the relationship among the three. First, we will use the data of behavior for customer network shopping in the questionnaire to establish the random probability model and forecast. Second, we calculate the expected customer behavior stickiness and customer value. Finally, we use resurvey data of 100 subjects after three months (selected randomly from 373 objects) to test the model prediction.

Findings

The findings show that customer behavior stickiness has a significant effect on customer value, and the moderating effect of the hedonic motivation of consumption on the relationship above is proved. The value of customers who hold high hedonic motivation of consumption is mainly driven from website’s single visit time, whereas the value of customers who hold low or middle hedonic motivation of consumption is mainly driven from a website’s visit frequency.

Originality/value

The paper proves and quantifies the effects of the customer behavior stickiness for customer value in times of behavior. The results prove the moderation role of consumer motivation of the customer for the path of customer behavior stickiness→customer value, and make clear that the hedonic motivation is a necessary condition of average site visit time that has a significant impact on customer value.

Details

Journal of Contemporary Marketing Science, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7480

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Shenglan Huang, Zhi Chen, Hefu Liu and Liying Zhou

This paper aims to examine the moderating effects of job alternatives and policy support on the relationship between job satisfaction and turnover intention.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the moderating effects of job alternatives and policy support on the relationship between job satisfaction and turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted in China. The study sample consisted of employees from organizations of different sizes, ownerships and industry types. Finally, 462 valid questionnaires were obtained.

Findings

Cognitive job satisfaction has a stronger negative effect on turnover than affective job satisfaction, and both effects depend on the factors related to ease of movement. Cognitive job satisfaction is more effective when job alternative is low and policy support is high, whereas affective job satisfaction leads to lesser turnover when job alternative is high and policy support is low.

Research limitations/implications

First, the demography of the respondents may have limited the generalizability of our findings. Second, this study has the limitation common to all cross-sectional studies. Third, this study focuses on turnover intention of employees rather than actual turnover rates. Finally, although the authors have identified specific factors related to ease of movement as the moderators by drawing upon the organizational equilibrium theory and current HRM literature, there may be other moderators that can affect the relationship between job satisfaction and turnover.

Practical implications

HRM managers should apply organizational HRM to the local institutional environment, especially to the human resource policies of local governments, which vary significantly across regions in China.

Social implications

HRM managers should be very cautious to approach career development task in China, especially when they have an attitude of whatever works in mature economies will surely work in organizations in Chinese society.

Originality/value

The findings extend previous career development literature that assumes unconditional effects of job satisfaction on turnover intention. With the objective of exploring the effects of conditional factors, the current study explores the special role of job alternatives and policy support in the job satisfaction – turnover relationship in the context of China. Additionally, the findings provide support for the application of organizational equilibrium theory in the context of China.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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