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Book part
Publication date: 18 October 2014

Paul Joyce and Ged Fitzgerald

The purpose of this paper is to advance the understanding of the choices and difficulties at a city level that faced public leaders who were trying to pursue economic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance the understanding of the choices and difficulties at a city level that faced public leaders who were trying to pursue economic regeneration while at the same time coping with austerity policies introduced by national government.

Design/methodology/approach

We are using a case study approach to assess both the type of strategic leadership being offered and the public governance issues faced by Liverpool City.

Findings

In terms of leadership, the mayor fitted what we describe in the paper as the pragmatic type of strategic leader (long-term perspective providing foresight, and inclusiveness in formulating strategy and plans). The directly elected mayoral system seemed to have a number of advantages, perhaps the key one being that the mayor, acted for the entire city, rather than being the leader of the city council as he was before. New channels of social dialogue had been opened up, especially with the business community. The major difficulties in governance were the overstretched entrepreneurial and strategic capacity of the centre of the council and a lack of coherence in terms of multi-level governance.

Social implications

The approach to public leadership in Liverpool represents a major break from the past; it was a widening of political inclusiveness to embrace people with a range of political perspectives. It was also a major break from the past in terms of building good relations between public leaders and business leaders. The prize was economic regeneration to create a better platform for social and economic inclusiveness.

Details

European Public Leadership in Crisis?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-901-0

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Alan Southern

This chapter explores the importance of place in the creation of new enterprise and wealth.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter explores the importance of place in the creation of new enterprise and wealth.

Methodology/approach

The chapter deploys a case study of the Liverpool city-region and provides a critical review of the conditions for small enterprise in the locality, with attention paid to enterprise in low income communities.

Findings

The argument here suggests that place and public investment are important contributory factors to help understand how enterprise can contribute to wealth creation.

Research limitations/implications

Further work is required to comprehend the wider aspects of enterprise in the context of place and particularly its relevance to low income communities.

Practical implications

Policy makers may acknowledge how enterprise as a tool of wealth creation can reinforce local dynamics of social and economic exclusion and that the nuance of place needs to be taken into account.

Social implications

Small enterprises have a wider potential beyond their economic role to impact local communities.

Originality/value

There are some studies in entrepreneurship that consider the propinquity between enterprise, place and wealth creation although placing this in the context of local economic decline and low income communities is a relatively under researched and misunderstood domain.

Details

Enterprising Places: Leadership and Governance Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-641-5

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Clare Kinsella

The paper aims to explore the relationship between rough sleepers, welfare and policy in the city of Liverpool, taking Liverpool City Council's Homelessness Strategy…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore the relationship between rough sleepers, welfare and policy in the city of Liverpool, taking Liverpool City Council's Homelessness Strategy 2008‐2011 as a starting point. The paper takes as its premise the notion of rough sleepers as among the most vulnerable and marginalised in society, and questions how well they are protected by policy.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach used is analysis and contextualisation of the strategy document in terms of welfare and criminological perspectives.

Findings

The paper posits that the city's European Capital of Culture Status for 2008 has acted as a springboard for further consumerist and regeneration‐driven aspirations, facilitated by restriction of entitlement to access city space for groups such as rough sleepers. The piece explores responses to rough sleepers and other “undesirable” city centre space users in Liverpool and contends that their behaviour and activities are criminalised. Ultimately, it is argued that the city, whilst it prioritises its goal of becoming a “world‐class city”, fails to deliver in terms of its welfare obligations.

Originality/value

It is argued that the failure of the strategy to adequately consider the direct needs of rough sleepers renders them subject to other approaches, namely criminalisation. The article is valuable to both academics interested in aspects of social justice and practitioners engaged in policy making, in that it highlights some of the ways in which policy can fail to meet its basic requirements.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 31 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Yi-De Liu

This paper aims to explore the effectiveness of a key branding campaign, based on a case study of Liverpool as the 2008 European Capital of Culture. Branding is a popular…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the effectiveness of a key branding campaign, based on a case study of Liverpool as the 2008 European Capital of Culture. Branding is a popular practice adopted by many cities in the context of intensified tourism competition.

Design/methodology/approach

This study looks at quantitative data collected from an on-street face-to-face survey in 2008. In total, 611 questionnaires were distributed to and collected from local residents, visitors from the immediate hinterland, domestic tourists and overseas visitors.

Findings

The analysis is done, first by investigating respondents’ impression on the Liverpool 08 brand and the branding campaign, and then by exploring the effects of the campaign. The positioning of Liverpool compared with other similar cities is addressed in the end.

Originality/value

Event marketers need to be aware that visitor perceptions of the event’s branding are unlikely to be homogeneous. This could have significant implications on the design of brand and branding campaign and, then, affect whether the city could be effectively marketed.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2019

Charlie Smith

Community libraries now constitute a significant proportion of library provision in the UK; however, there is relatively little research on how the transfer to this model…

Abstract

Purpose

Community libraries now constitute a significant proportion of library provision in the UK; however, there is relatively little research on how the transfer to this model has affected those libraries and the wider balance of provision. The purpose of this paper is to broaden the discourse and understanding about the impact of changing libraries to community models.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a qualitative evaluation of all the libraries transferred to community-managed models within a large city council region in the UK. Structured research visits were made to appraise each library. These are discussed in the context of published literature and data, both specific to the study area and nationally.

Findings

Transferring the management of libraries to community organisations is often reactive and perceived with negative associations. This study uncovers increases in use and diversification of services following transfer; however, support from the local authority and the previous experience of managing organisations are significant factors. The paper also reveals how the successful transfer of a library to a community organisation led to more being moved out of local authority control, but that the support they receive from the local authority can be inconsistent between them.

Originality/value

The paper provides a study of community-managed libraries across a large city council area, affording an in-depth understanding of their impact on overall provision over one region. It will be of value to those involved in library management and service provision at both local and strategic levels, including local authorities and community groups considering library transfer.

Details

Library Management, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Vishwas Maheshwari, Ian Vandewalle and David Bamber

The aim of this research is to examine the place brand construct and to establish its role in the sustainable development of a place. This research reviews the evolution…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to examine the place brand construct and to establish its role in the sustainable development of a place. This research reviews the evolution, development and effectiveness of the place branding concept from the perspectives of regeneration, growth and sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

The main research focus is on establishing key facets responsible for driving the brand of a place and examining the relationship between them in terms of achieving sustainability. A place‐specific branding campaign (using the Liverpool '08, European Capital of Culture status) was considered and data collected from the key stakeholders in Liverpool.

Findings

The findings suggest that place branding plays an important role in the sustainable development of a place, provided that the momentum of progress is maintained. In turn, these sustainable developments help promote the place and thereby create stronger place brands.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst some of the facets identified in this study are place‐specific (Liverpool is a port, for example), there is much of a generic nature here and the facets identified in this research could provide useful practical constructs for place branding practices and may therefore become the basis of a formal place brand framework which has a more generic application in terms of sustainable development.

Originality/value

This research paper provides better understanding of place branding and further explores its role into sustainable development through relationship framework.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1955

GEORGE CHANDLER

Just over two years ago Liverpool City Council established a Technical Library as part of its pioneer policy of assisting the development of new industries on Merseyside…

Abstract

Just over two years ago Liverpool City Council established a Technical Library as part of its pioneer policy of assisting the development of new industries on Merseyside. The City Council recognized that the lack of adequate technical information facilities was undoubtedly a reason why some scientific discoveries were not applied as rapidly to industry as they might be. Hence it established a number of services in the Technical Library, aiming at forging a dynamic link between new scientific knowledge and its potential user.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Anthony J. Evans

The purpose of this paper is to use a case study of Liverpool, UK, to perform a public choice analysis of the governance of Chinatown. This case study is a theoretical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use a case study of Liverpool, UK, to perform a public choice analysis of the governance of Chinatown. This case study is a theoretical application of clubs and interest group theory to ethnic economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on fieldwork conducted in the Chinatown of Liverpool, England. It utilises interviews, surveys and observation to capture the emergence of the organisation of the community.

Findings

The paper demonstrates how the availability of regeneration funds can create incentives for voluntary community associations to switch into predatory rent‐seeking collectives. The characteristics of a Chinese community are predisposed towards being an effective interest group.

Originality/value

The paper presents new primary data and is a rare attempt to chart the evolution and development of “ethnic enterprise governance”. It extends the existing literature on the economic organisation of Chinatown into a theory of the political representation of ethnic communities, utilising the tradition of rational choice political science.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Ian Stenton and Rachael Hanmer-Dwight

This paper aims to study the development of the Liverpool Knowledge Quarter Sustainability Network (KQSN). It outlines the sectors included in the collaborative…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the development of the Liverpool Knowledge Quarter Sustainability Network (KQSN). It outlines the sectors included in the collaborative knowledge-sharing, the nature of the work it facilitates, and considers how the network can transform its existing objectives around the shared vision of the United Nations sustainable development goals (SDGs).

Design/methodology/approach

The KQSN operates in a collaborative cross-sectoral forum to support, facilitate or coordinate projects around sustainability, with core leads sitting in higher education and health care.

Findings

The KQSN supports projects through collaborative activity and enables members to access specialist advice available through the network. Through its membership, the KQSN is primed to develop metrics for demonstrating Knowledge Quarter SDG-aligned activity. The KQSN has scope to increase its level of implementation arising from its shared values, with a renewed focus around the SDGs.

Practical implications

This paper contributes to the 2018 EAUC Annual Conference theme of “Collaborations for Change” and the need for transformative partnerships that are prepared to align their mission to the SDGs.

Originality/value

Unlike discipline- or sector-specific networks, the KQSN has an inclusive membership, making it an original multi-disciplinary sustainability platform for neighbouring organisations in and around Liverpool's Knowledge Quarter. This case study can support other knowledge cluster communities to replicate its model. This case study also presents a diverse range of small projects, which are easily replicable and hopefully will inspire others to do something similar.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 20 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

K.G.B. Bakewell

Resource sharing is an important element inthe national planning of library andinformation services to meet the needs ofinformation, education and culture of thewhole…

Abstract

Resource sharing is an important element in the national planning of library and information services to meet the needs of information, education and culture of the whole community at all levels. An overview of resource sharing practices is presented, with particular reference to the British scene. It is also argued that, with the approach of the Single Market in 1992, resource sharing should now be considered on a European scale. In conclusion, some problems associated with the practice of resource sharing are considered.

Details

Library Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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