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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Ed Chung

Examines two important streams of migrant consumer research, specifically the contributions made by the study of cultural values and migrant acculturation. Noting the…

Abstract

Examines two important streams of migrant consumer research, specifically the contributions made by the study of cultural values and migrant acculturation. Noting the inadequacies of focusing on just one single perspective, reports an interpretative research conducted with ethnic Chinese migrant consumers. Emergent themes are extracted to illustrate the lived worlds of migrant consumers as they negotiate their way in a new society.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1982

DONALD VANDENBERG

This paper serves as a response to the interchange between Sungaila and Riffel in the Journal in May and October, 1979. In this paper the writer applies some of his…

Abstract

This paper serves as a response to the interchange between Sungaila and Riffel in the Journal in May and October, 1979. In this paper the writer applies some of his earlier methodological ideas about phenomenology and educational research to the study of educational administration in a way that might be of interest to the readers of the Journal. The main argument is that the kind of phenomenology that should be used in the study of educational administration is the kind the experienced practitioner would employ to articulate and conceptualise the insights she or he has gained through administrative experience. This would establish the basic concepts regarding the phenomena perceived in the administrator's lived world, thereby furnishing the appropriate context to guide the application of specific theories, strategies, and research results.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Richard Beach, Michelle M. Falter and Jennifer Jackson Whitley

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to make the case for the value of fostering collaborative sensemaking in responding to literature. Drawing on examples of classroom…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to make the case for the value of fostering collaborative sensemaking in responding to literature. Drawing on examples of classroom interactions in 6th-, 8th-, 11th- and 12th-grade classrooms, it proposes methods for teachers to foster collaborative sensemaking.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on theories of “participatory sensemaking” (Fuchs and De Jaegher, 2009), transactional literary response (Rosenblatt, 1994) and “comprehension-as-sensemaking” pedagogy (Aukerman, 2013), this paper conceptualizes collaborative sensemaking to illustrate how teachers foster making sense of texts through sharing responses based on lived-world experiences, understanding the use of literary techniques and understanding events in students’ own lives.

Findings

Given that this is not an empirical study, there are no findings. The discussion of students’ sensemaking practices in responding to classroom texts, suggests the importance of teachers creating open-ended response events in which students collaboratively support each other in making sense of characters’ actions and events, as opposed to having to conform to teachers’ predetermined agendas.

Practical implications

Analysis of the classroom discussions suggests the importance of building students’ trust in the process of sensemaking itself, fostering adoption of alternative perspectives as central to sensemaking and using activities for students’ translating or rewriting events in texts to co-create texts with authors.

Originality/value

This paper explores the importance of teachers engaging students in open-ended, sensemaking response events based on attending to “in-between,” dialogic meanings through sharing emotions, alternative perspectives and related experiences to enhance students’ engagement in responding to literature.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Book part
Publication date: 30 May 2017

Ângela Cristina Salgueiro Marques and Luis Mauro Sá Martino

This chapter elaborates a phenomenological framework for the concept of “communication” by drawing mainly on the notion “lifeworld,” created by Husserl and developed by…

Abstract

This chapter elaborates a phenomenological framework for the concept of “communication” by drawing mainly on the notion “lifeworld,” created by Husserl and developed by Habermas. The concept of “lifeworld” is approached as a communication-grounded idea.

The chapter is a theoretical essay, grounded mainly on bibliographical research. Main sources are the two volumes of Habermas’ The Theory of Communicative Action (Habermas, 1987), seconded by other works by the German philosopher and some commentators as Stein (2004) e Pizzi (2006). The chapter endeavors to show that the phenomenological notion of “lifeworld” might be key to a critical understanding of main constructivist approaches in communication theory. It could be particularly illuminating where the focus is on a “reality,” which results from intersubjective interactions in everyday life. Most communication theories are media-centered, which means that they regard the “media,” both in its technical and institutional aspects as the main focus of the communication process. This chapter argues that the “lifeworld” is a far broader way to understand communication as a form of social interaction, whether mediated by media technologies or not. The chapter discusses the concept of “lifeworld,” framing its relational and communicative aspects as fundamental to the notion of “reality” as an interactive social creation. It also proposes the understanding of “communication” grounded on this phenomenological notion. Finally, it discusses some problems and limits of this approach, offering an alternative approach to conventional communication theory.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

William L. Waugh and Wesley W. Waugh

Phenomenologists are among the strongest opponents of logical positivism. Mostly associated with Edmund Husserl, phenomenology is essentially an analytical method or…

Abstract

Phenomenologists are among the strongest opponents of logical positivism. Mostly associated with Edmund Husserl, phenomenology is essentially an analytical method or framework for describing and explaining social relationships and psychological orientations. Phenomenologists attempt to account for the subjective qualities which logical positivists and empiricists assume to be unreal or are mistakenly treated as objective observable phenomena. The authors note that phenomenology has been absorbed into the literature and the language of the field especially in terms of how people do and do not relate to bureaucratic organizations and government programs.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 31 March 2017

Outlook for Brazilian agriculture.

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DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB219954

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Sue Monk and Elizabeth Mackinlay

The purpose of this paper is to explore their experiences as singers in a community choir called Arrkula (a Yanyuwa word meaning “one voice”) based in the School of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore their experiences as singers in a community choir called Arrkula (a Yanyuwa word meaning “one voice”) based in the School of Education at the University of Queensland as performance of song, self, social justice and seeing beyond boundaries. Performing at “gigs” inside and outside the university, Arrkula has been singing together since 2011, and despite an environment replete with neo-liberal ideals of individualism, competitiveness and capitalist driven research agendas, at the centre of their song remains a yearning for social connection, equality and renewed consciousness.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors take an autoethnographic creative approach and bring performance of song together with their stories and interviews with choir members to link the “secret space” of the rehearsal with the “public space” of staged performances.

Findings

The authors’ aim is to think and perform the potential the voice and voices of Arrkula hold in terms of heightening senses of agency, provoking and empowering a pursuit of freedom and transforming lived worlds through song.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is the authors’ take up of Maxine Greene’s (2005, p. 38) question, “if we can link imagination to our sense of possibility and our ability to respond to other human beings, can we link it to the making of community as well?” to consider what singing for democracy and difference might mean individually and collectively in the current climate of higher education.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Book part
Publication date: 30 May 2017

Abstract

Details

Brazil
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-785-4

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Jonna Bornemark

What happens when we limit our understanding of reason to a calculating competence? In this chapter, I will approach the contemporary introduction of New Public Management…

Abstract

What happens when we limit our understanding of reason to a calculating competence? In this chapter, I will approach the contemporary introduction of New Public Management (NPM) in the Swedish public sector from the point of view of the fifteenth century philosopher Nicholas of Cusa and his critical analysis of reason and not-knowing. Cusa emphasises not-knowing as something which we cannot and should not avoid. As such it is central to every creation of knowledge. Reason, as the process to gaining knowledge also includes the capacity to relate to not-knowing. In modernity, the understanding of not-knowing has decreased and accordingly changed our understanding of reason. Reason became a calculating capacity, what Cusa calls ratio, rather than a reflecting capacity, what Cusa calls intellectus. The introduction of NPM in the Swedish public sector can, from this point of view, be seen as a kind of ratio-organisation, and I will point out three characteristics of this ratiofication: First, it includes a ‘concept imperialism’, as concepts from outside of the public service-activities displaces concepts that come from within. In this displacement, easily measurable concepts and concepts that frame a measurement-culture displace concepts that belong to the intellect. Second, we can see an ‘empaperment’ when every act has to be documented in order to be counted as complete, and where the empapered world of ratio becomes more central than the lived world with its constant presence of not-knowing. Third, this also results in a ‘remote controlling’ of activities when the acts of the staff are governed from the outside, and the competence to listen to the not-knowing of each situation is not valued.

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Donovan Cox, Anne Wilcock and May Aung

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new measure for organization health. It is proposed that the Donohue tripartite paradigm model can be used to pierce the veneer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new measure for organization health. It is proposed that the Donohue tripartite paradigm model can be used to pierce the veneer of the satisficing account to identify the moral appraisal stakeholders have made of corporate strategies based on external (i.e. economic, etc.) standards.

Design/methodology/approach

A cognitive mapping process through narratives is used to operationalize a tripartite paradigm framework to measure human capital. An existential‐phenomenological approach is adopted to ensure the figural integrity of data.

Findings

This paper can be viewed as the prototypical development phase for a methodology to support future real‐time ethical inquiry concerning social responsibility within the corporate world.

Research limitations/implications

The tripartite paradigm model expressed by Donohue was intended for “real‐time” application. This study, however, proposed a retrospective analysis of stakeholder decision‐making within a firm as a means of unearthing any deficiencies that might block the operationalization of Donohue's generalist theory.

Practical implications

This appraisal can identify the conflict of conscience that characterizes a stakeholder's “lived‐worlds” based on their participation and exposure to company decision making. This diagnostic tool can assist stakeholders in identifying evidence of decline early enough in the history of an organization for proactive remedial action to be taken.

Originality/value

It is the hope of this study that the proposed cognitive mapping process can derive a measure of organizational health through an existential‐phenomenological approach to ensure the integrity of the data. Ultimately, the aim is that this will be a tool that can explore the phenomenon of misrepresentation and its effect on social cooperation within a market culture.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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