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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Philip Morgan and Jackie Lawson

Since 2010, Dorset HealthCare University NHS Trust has been running a Hidden Talents project seeking to better understand how mental health services can value the lived

Abstract

Purpose

Since 2010, Dorset HealthCare University NHS Trust has been running a Hidden Talents project seeking to better understand how mental health services can value the lived experience of their staff. The purpose of this paper is to inform discussions on how clinicians and other staff can share their lived experience of mental health problems to improve the experience of people who access services, their carers and supporters and promote the wellbeing of all staff.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion paper was developed through the use of qualitative data collected through three focus groups. One of the focus groups represented people who are part of the Hidden Talents Project, one focus group had representatives of the different professional bodies and the third represented people who access services.

Findings

It was identified that there were two differing considerations between sharing personal experience one was sharing with people who access services, the other was sharing with colleagues and managers. It was identified that in order to safely share personal experience it needed to happen in an supportive organisational culture. A number of suggestions were made as to considered why, when, how and what to share with people who access services.

Research limitations/implications

This is not a formal piece of research, rather it is an exploration of a range of views and set out into a discussion document. Further action and research is required to explore this topic area in more detail.

Originality/value

At present a number of mental health services are beginning to address the value of lived experience in the workforce. Very little has been published exploring how people can share their live experience. This paper provides a starting point for these discussions.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Book part
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Gayathri Wijesinghe

This chapter examines how hospitality and tourism researchers can use ‘expressive text’ (or writing) to express the lived quality of an experience in order to ‘show what…

Abstract

This chapter examines how hospitality and tourism researchers can use ‘expressive text’ (or writing) to express the lived quality of an experience in order to ‘show what an experience is really like’ rather than ‘tell what it is like’. Expressive text refers to written language forms such as narrative, poetry and metaphor that can be used as tools in research to vividly represent the meaning and feeling conveyed in an experience. The expressive text-based approach to researching lived experience provides a textual link between experience and its expression. For this reason, it is especially useful when working with lived experience accounts of phenomenological and hermeneutic research.

The expressive text-based approach suggested here is still a relatively under explored arena within hospitality and tourism research. As a relatively under explored arena, the rich insightful knowledge that can be gained from understanding practitioner experience is rarely a central focus of scholarly writings about the workplace in hospitality and tourism contexts. However, in order to be fully appreciated as a discipline in its own right and to advance knowledge of the field, understanding the typical and significant attributes of hospitality and tourism work will be decidedly helpful.

One of the difficulties of working with lived experience accounts is finding a suitable research approach that helps to both retain the lived elements of the experience and ensure the rigour of the inquiry. An expressive text-based methodological framework that has a phenomenological and hermeneutic philosophical underpinning is argued to be suitable for this purpose. Therefore, the focus of this study is to discuss such a methodology and explain the reasons for its content, style and structure in researching lived experience. The approach that is proposed here consists of a five-tiered textually expressive methodology that is employed to contextualise, portray and interpret the lived experience meanings in order to understand the significance of the experience in relation to relevant discourses in hospitality and tourism studies, and to consider implications for policy and professional practice. The guiding questions of the five-tiered framework cover the following issues: (1) What is the context of the lived experience? (2) What is the lived experience of this practice like? (3) What is the meaning of this experience for the practitioner? (4) What is the significance of the experience in contributing to the advancement of knowledge within the field? (5) What are the implications for practice and professional development?

To illustrate uses of this methodology in research, the study here includes an example showing portrayals and interpretations of the typical and significant lived nature of hospitality reception work. This shows and communicates the full meaning of the episode, circumstances or situation. The chapter then concludes with some reflections on benefits as well as tensions in working within an expressive text-based phenomenological and hermeneutic framework.

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-742-0

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Chiara Rossato and Paola Castellani

This paper aims to examine how long-lived firms can further develop through digitalisation in terms of actions, conditions and effects from a competitiveness perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how long-lived firms can further develop through digitalisation in terms of actions, conditions and effects from a competitiveness perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study follows an inductive approach based on a survey conducted via interviews undertaken with nine long-lived Italian firms. The dimensions of the model (command, continuity, community, connection), elaborated by Miller and Le Breton-Miller (2005) in relation to longevity factors, were chosen to analyse digitalisation’s contribution to these long-lived firms’ development.

Findings

The digitalisation implemented by the analysed firms contributed in a variety of ways: (1) improved the efficiency and effectiveness of their business processes, (2) enhanced the understanding of customer experience, (3) supported their craftsmanship and the transmission of the knowledge included in the entrepreneurial path, (4) increased the awareness of the cultural value of the firms’ heritage and (5) allowed for the development of cutting-edge design skills by experimenting with content on different digital platforms and devices.

Practical implications

This study suggests managers of long-lived firms develop digital skills that allow them to interact with the rapid evolution of this context and understand how to effectively implement digitalisation in their specific firm. From this perspective, it is strategic to establish or strengthen collaborative network relationships to acquire such necessary skills.

Originality/value

This study provides novel empirical evidence on how long-lived firms are facing the challenge of digitalisation in terms of actions, conditions and effects to improve their competitiveness and ensure their survival.

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Dina Abbott and Gordon Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the importance of lived experiences, as complementary knowledge to that provided by the sciences, for policy and intervention on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the importance of lived experiences, as complementary knowledge to that provided by the sciences, for policy and intervention on climate change.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper draws on several strands within the context of climate change: knowledge and power; human engagement; the meaning of “lived experience” (and its association with “local/indigenous knowledge”); its capture through interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary inquiry; post-normal science; rationalist and public action approaches to policy and intervention. The paper combines these strands from their different literatures, previous work by the authors and interdisciplinary deliberation in a European climate change education project.

Findings

The case is made for taking account of lived experiences in climate change policy and intervention, and the dangers of not doing so. The paper, however, also identifies the challenge of establishing the validity of lived experience alongside forms of scientifically derived knowledge, and the practical challenge of capturing it in a form that is accessible to practitioners. It concludes by arguing that a public action approach to policy provides a better lens than the conventional rationalist approach to analyse the contested nature of climate science and the potential of lived experience to inform debates through active engagement.

Research limitations/implications

There has been no empirical study on climate change that addresses the research concerns. This would be necessary to forward the paper's agenda.

Practical implications

The paper makes a case for formalising evidence that is based on lived experience in policy making and intervention, and the approach that is needed.

Originality/value

The work develops the concept of lived experience in the context of climate change. Its public action theory of knowledge provides a novel means of analysing and meeting the challenge of diverse knowledge on climate change.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Sarah Paynter and Christine Rivers

The purpose of this paper is to examine the surrounding attitudes, culture and workplace environment in which Oxleas NHS Foundation trust developed a network for staff…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the surrounding attitudes, culture and workplace environment in which Oxleas NHS Foundation trust developed a network for staff with lived experience of mental ill health.

Design/methodology/approach

Sarah Paynter completed an interview talking about her experiences with a peer, which was recorded, then the authors picked out relevant themes from this which are grounded in lived experience. The paper examines the theme of lived experience in the workplace in more depth, from a personal perspective (Sarah) and from an organisational perspective (Christine).

Findings

There is a lack of dialogue about staff lived experience of mental ill health within the workplace. There are compelling reasons from both the perspective of the organisation and staff with lived experience for setting up a lived experience staff network. The authors note that increased dialogue and visibility has added value on both sides.

Originality/value

This is a relatively new initiative in the NHS, and particularly in mental health trusts. The authors speak from their experiences in Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust. This is of value to organisations looking to start dialogue and therefore improve the experiences of staff and the quality of the organisation.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Richard Schweizer, Ellen Marks and Rob Ramjan

Recently, the importance of a lived experience workforce in the delivery of mental health services has been demonstrated. The roll-out of the National Disability Insurance…

Abstract

Purpose

Recently, the importance of a lived experience workforce in the delivery of mental health services has been demonstrated. The roll-out of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) in Australia has generated the need for a significant increase in the disability workforce, including psychosocial disability. The purpose of this paper is to describe the strategies outlined in the One Door Mental Health Lived Experience Framework (LEF), which is the culmination of over 30 years of experience in providing mental health services and the employment of a lived experience workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

One Door developed and implemented the LEF, a thorough guide to the employment and support of a workforce of people with lived experience of mental illness, through consultation with consumers, carers, stakeholders, practice advisors, management, human resources and employee focus groups.

Findings

Extensive support structures in the LEF are key to achieving the benefits of a lived experience workforce. The LEF has positioned One Door successfully for the achievement of key organisational goals in mental health support and advocacy.

Research limitations/implications

Mental health policies and support are critical for productivity outcomes in any workplace regardless of the level of lived experience of the employees. This paper provides organisations, particularly those within the mental health sector, an example to build on in their own employment and support strategies.

Originality/value

This paper is of particular value in the context of organisations in the mental health sector transitioning to the NDIS.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Alan Reinstein and Gerald H. Lander

The provisions of Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 144, Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long‐lived Assets, have raised many…

Abstract

The provisions of Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 144, Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long‐lived Assets, have raised many implementation issues for entities adhering to its increased requirements to recognize and measure the costs associated with the impairment of assets. After outlining these new requirements and some general implementation issues, the paper discusses how members of key groups view the new standard, using the responses to a mail survey. It was found that user‐oriented groups expressed significantly different viewpoints than did preparer‐oriented groups. The survey results also found many respondents stating that the new standard provides improved guidance for many complex situations, while others do not believe that the standard is cost justified.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Maximiliane Szinovacz

This study, based on data from the National Survey of Families and Households, confirms normative preference for nuclear households across all cohorts and racial/ethnic…

Abstract

This study, based on data from the National Survey of Families and Households, confirms normative preference for nuclear households across all cohorts and racial/ethnic groups throughout this century. However, a noteworthy minority (about 30%) did live with grandparents at some time during their childhood. Living with grandparents as well as having a grandparent live in one's parental household were somewhat more prevalent during the 30's and 40's, indicating that extended households may have been formed in response to the Depression and especially World War II. There also is a significant effect of nuclear family structure: living arrangements with grandparents predominate among those who did not live with both parents at some time during their childhood. The data also suggest that it is important to differentiate between grandparental living arrangements that are oriented toward the care of the grandchildren and those arrangements that imply care for the grandparent: the former arrangement predominates among Blacks, whereas the latter is more common among Whites. During the past decade there has been increased interest in extended family living arrangements and particularly in households including grandparents and/or grandchildren. This interest reflects several demographic trends during the latter part of this century, especially increases in divorce and in parental problems (drugs, AIDS) that preclude parents from taking care of their own children as well as increases in longevity and in the survival of frail elderly, many of whom come to live with their adult children. Census data offer information on the prevalence of extended family arrangements at any one point in time, but they are insufficient to estimate a person's lifetime “risk” of living with grandparents and provide only limited information on the duration of such living arrangements. Data from the National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH) include information not only on whether individuals ever lived with their grandparents but also on the type and the duration of such arrangements. Based on this data set, this article assesses trends in living arrangements with grandparents, and variations in these trends by race and childhood family structure.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 16 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 22 April 2013

Gayathri Wijesinghe

The focus of this chapter is firstly, to introduce the theoretical framework of an expressive approach that is suitable to research workers’ lived experience and secondly…

Abstract

The focus of this chapter is firstly, to introduce the theoretical framework of an expressive approach that is suitable to research workers’ lived experience and secondly, to demonstrate through a practical example how this approach can be used to uncover ethical/moral concerns. In hospitality and tourism, research on ethics is still evolving; hence explorations of workers’ lived experience in search of ethical/moral concerns are limited. Perspectives of all stakeholders’ in the production and consumption of hospitality and tourism are necessary to advance knowledge in the field and strengthen the practice and pedagogy; but whilst representations of customers’ and managers’ perspectives abound that of workers are limited. Also, research approaches suitable to study lived experience are under explored. The expressive approach introduced herein draws on the philosophical tenets of phenomenology to portray the lived quality of the experience and hermeneutics to uncover its meanings and significance. This approach can textually expresses and evoke the lived quality of an experience using stories, poetry and metaphor. Its ability to evoke empathy through these media can be a powerful tool to persuade policy makers to care and attend to prevailing ethical/moral issues. The chapter begins by reviewing research into ethics in the context of hospitality and tourism practice and discussing the paucity of research representing women receptionists’ lived experiences concerning moral issues. It introduces an expressive research approach and provides a practical application of this approach in hospitality receptionists’ work. The chapter concludes by highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of the expressive approach.

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2020

Shimri Hadas Grundman, Neta Edri and Renana Stanger Elran

This paper aims to present a working model for using experiential knowledge in the work of lived experience practitioners within the mental health field.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a working model for using experiential knowledge in the work of lived experience practitioners within the mental health field.

Design/methodology/approach

The working model is constructed from three key elements, namely, components of lived experience, the Library of Life Experiences and the NISE technique for sharing experiential knowledge (NISE: need identification; inner identification; sharing experiential knowledge and interpersonal encounter).

Findings

The model will be described, followed by central themes that emerged from a pilot course that was taught in Israel in 2019 to a group of peers working in the mental health system. The central themes were: developing peer identity; sharing peer language; internalizing the working model; understanding the peer role; and awakening social consciousness.

Originality/value

The original working model and training course were co-produced and co-conducted by peer specialists and mental health professionals, for the use of lived experience practitioners.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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