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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Terrence H. Witkowski

This article seeks to bring two hitherto neglected Polish language texts on selling and salesmanship to the attention of marketing historians. In contrast to Bartels'…

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to bring two hitherto neglected Polish language texts on selling and salesmanship to the attention of marketing historians. In contrast to Bartels' seminal work, this research aims to show that early marketing writing was not just in the English language and that early marketing thought was disseminated via instruction outside institutions of higher education. The research also intends to explore how marketing education served to acculturate one group of immigrants to American business norms.

Design/methodology/approach

The primary sources are Sprzedawca czyli: Sztuka Prowadzenia Handlu Podług Systemów Amerykańskich (Salesman: The Art of Commerce According to American Norms) by Józef Mierzyński and Sprzedawnictwo Sklepowe (Store Salesmanship), third edition, by Bolesław Z. Urbanski. Both were published in Chicago. Their tables of contents were translated and compared to selected English language texts on selling and salesmanship written about the same time. Additional information on the authors, publishers, and potential audience was also gathered to give context to these texts.

Findings

These Polish language books contained much of the same information as the English language literature on sales from the period, but with more information on personal comportment and more illustrative material. These books provide evidence of sophisticated business thinking among some Polish immigrants. Commercial correspondence courses and self‐instruction brought early marketing thought to this market and thus helped Poles enter the American economic mainstream.

Originality/value

The article shows that these are the first books on selling and salesmanship – or on any other marketing topic – known to be written in the USA prior to 1920 in a language other than English. They are worthy of close scrutiny because they reveal a new dimension to the early creation and dissemination of marketing thought.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

H.G.A. Hughes

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Reference Reviews, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Stuart James

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Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Nicole Seabrook

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Library Review, vol. 56 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Peter Wellburn

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Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Lottie Alexander

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Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Stuart James

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Reference Reviews, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Reference Reviews, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Abstract

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Library Review, vol. 56 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Carl A. Lehnen and Terri Artemchik

This study aims to use research guides as a window to disciplinary information literacy in the field of modern language studies from a librarian’s point of view. Informed…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to use research guides as a window to disciplinary information literacy in the field of modern language studies from a librarian’s point of view. Informed by literature on disciplinary research practices and on library research guides, it analyzes how librarians represent, and teach, an especially rich and multifaceted information landscape.

Design/methodology/approach

Researchers analyzed the topical coverage, organization, resource emphasis and instructional content of 182 research guides in the field of modern language studies. Data were collected both manually and automatically using a Web scraper. Data were then coded using categories developed by the authors.

Findings

Guides focused on language and literature topics, with some interdisciplinary coverage. Guides tended to focus on resources and formats rather than user tasks or instruction. Over two thirds of guides included some type of instruction, primarily focused on locating resources, and a slim majority of instructional topics were specific to modern language studies.

Research limitations/implications

Looking at guides from another field would have allowed for cross-disciplinary comparisons. It is possible that including guides from additional languages or universities would have given different results.

Originality/value

Although there is significant literature on research guides, few have analyzed how they reflect what information literacy looks like in a particular discipline. This study also contributes to research on information literacy instruction for modern languages and recommends that it be informed by an understanding of disciplinary research practices.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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