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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2018

Shelby Cosner, Lisa Walker, Jason Swanson, Martha Hebert and Samuel P. Whalen

The purpose of this paper is to identify the coaching structures that aspiring principals associate with developmentally consequential coaching interactions; identify…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the coaching structures that aspiring principals associate with developmentally consequential coaching interactions; identify structural features/functions/attributes that shape a structure’s developmental utility and use; and consider how a multifarious coaching structure might advantage the learning experiences of aspiring principals.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study included multiple interviews with two cohorts of aspiring principals (n=20) from one preparation program and with their leadership coaches (n=5) and was framed using the theories of social capital and networks, situated learning, and distributed cognition.

Findings

The authors identified eight coaching structures that aspirants identified as consequential to their learning and development. The authors identified four structural features/functions/attributes that shape a structure’s developmental utility. The authors identified three factors that contribute to the developmental utility of this multifarious coaching model.

Research limitations/implications

This study includes a relatively small participant sample –70 percent of the aspiring principals from two cohorts within one preparation program. Data do not include direct observations of coaching interactions within the context of individual coaching structures.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that the structuring of leadership coaching is a critical consideration for those designing leadership coaching programs. This multifarious structuring of leadership coaching created three developmental affordances.

Originality/value

This paper generates new knowledge for the field of principal preparation related to the structuring of leadership coaching and ways in which structuring can shape aspirant learning experiences. These findings are likely to also be instructive to those interested in coaching more generally.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 56 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2017

Murray Webster and Lisa Slattery Walker

To review three theoretical research programs accounting for the spread of status beliefs and their effects on inequality, and to identify similarities and differences in…

Abstract

Purpose

To review three theoretical research programs accounting for the spread of status beliefs and their effects on inequality, and to identify similarities and differences in scope and theoretical principles in the three. We describe suggestions for further research that we hope readers may wish to pursue.

Methodology/approach

We summarize recent theory and research, identify areas of overlap and dissimilarity, and show how certain research topics could extend understanding of the processes and make connections among the three programs.

Findings

The three programs were built on ideas first codified more than five decades ago. Those ideas have been the foundation for empirical research and findings from that have been used to develop the theories, improving the range of situations addressed and the precision of predictions. While the programs here address similar issues, each presumes different initial conditions and behavioral outcomes. With some overlap, the programs also address different situations and propose different mechanisms for the spread of status.

Research limitations

Our review of the programs is necessarily incomplete, because work continues on the programs. The analyses and suggestions about important topics to pursue are ours, and others may identify other topics for theoretical and empirical development.

Practical implications

We hope that our interpretations of these programs make them more accessible to interested scholars who will extend the theoretical and empirical bases of the work. The processes described have implications for the status of immigrant groups, the social position of women, and the value attached to collector’s objects. We hope to foster applications of these theories to understand and alleviate some cases of unmerited inequality.

Social implications

The processes involved affect mixed-gender interaction in businesses, hiring biases, anti-immigrant exclusion sentiments, influence and bargaining power of individuals, desirability of certain furniture and clothing styles, ability inferences, and other phenomena. We mention instances where these theories can help to understand processes and to develop interventions to produce desirable outcomes.

Originality/value

No readily accessible summary of these programs and no theoretical comparison of them has yet been developed. Formal theories such as these sometimes seem obscure and we hope to show how they apply to important actual situations. Of course, the interpretations and suggestions in this chapter are our own and the scholars whose work we discuss might interpret the work differently.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-192-8

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Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Lisa Slattery Walker

This project tests two mechanisms for controlling and reversing unwanted status effects of the characteristic gender. Previous interventions have been developed regarding…

Abstract

This project tests two mechanisms for controlling and reversing unwanted status effects of the characteristic gender. Previous interventions have been developed regarding a number of status characteristics and have been tested and implemented to varying degrees. Theoretically based interventions, such as those I am testing here, hold great promise in alleviating status-based disadvantages faced unequally by different groups within society.

An experiment is described using the standard experimental setting for expectation states and status characteristics theory testing.

Results indicate that the theory’s predictions about reversing gender’s status effects are correct. The theory explains 87% of the variation in the observed data.

This work extends prior analytic work in developing and assessing theoretically guided interventions to overcome status disadvantages.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-504-2

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Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2017

Abstract

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-192-8

Content available

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Abstract

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-504-2

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

This article aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Any organizations aiming to seek a competitive advantage and/or to reach a larger audience will be keen to exploit new possibilities that technological progress opens up to them. The origins of social media might well lie in the “simple” aim of creating a communications tool among friends, but these soon brought other opportunities. However, the extent to which the Web 2.0 era has provided a return for companies and organizations seeking to exploit it remains open to debate.

Practical implications

The article provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2011

Allison C. Carey

Purpose – This chapter examines the ways in which community has been discussed and pursued within American disability politics. It shows the various, often contradictory…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter examines the ways in which community has been discussed and pursued within American disability politics. It shows the various, often contradictory, understandings of community in play and examines the strengths and weaknesses of various strategies used to create community.

Methodology/approach – Using comparative historical techniques of analysis, this chapter compares different conceptualizations of community as they are used by activists and in policies.

Findings – While “community” is often an ideal embedded in activists' aspirations, historically it has meant very different things. The assumptions embedded in the idea of community affect the strategies and policies pursued by activists.

Practical and social implications – Each strategy to pursue community has advantages and disadvantages. Community as place leads to clear policy objectives, but often fails to achieve meaningful relational transformations. Community as social capital focuses on building social relationships, but leaves unaddressed membership in the national community and issues of citizenship. Ideals of community based on insider/outsider distinctions can be effective at unifying a group, but encourages the exclusion of others. Community as social citizenship demands the state uphold a commitment to support all citizens, but is often politically unpalatable. These ideas of community are often used together, sometimes to build upon one another, and other times in ways that are contradictory.

Originality/value of the chapter – Community is a lauded yet elusive goal. This chapter contributes to our understanding of disability politics and the tensions in creating “community.”

Details

Disability and Community
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-800-8

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Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2013

David Pettinicchio

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, disability rights found a place on the U.S. policy agenda. However, it did not do so because social movement groups pressured political…

Abstract

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, disability rights found a place on the U.S. policy agenda. However, it did not do so because social movement groups pressured political elites or because politicians were responding to changes in public preferences. Drawing from recent work in neo-institutionalism and social movements, namely the theory of strategic action fields, I posit that exogenous shocks in the 1960s caused a disability policy monopoly to collapse giving way to a new policy community. Using original longitudinal data on congressional committees, hearings, bills, and laws, as well as data from the Policy Agendas Project, I demonstrate the ways in which entrepreneurs pursued a new policy image of rights within a context of increasing committee involvement, issue complexity, and space on the policy agenda, and the consequences this had on policy.

Details

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-732-0

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2007

Michela Montesi and John Mackenzie Owen

The literature on abstracts recommends the revision of author supplied abstracts before their inclusion in database collections. However, little guidance is given on how…

Abstract

Purpose

The literature on abstracts recommends the revision of author supplied abstracts before their inclusion in database collections. However, little guidance is given on how to carry out such revision, and few studies exist on this topic. The purpose of this research paper is to first survey 187 bibliographic databases to ascertain how many did revise abstracts, and then study the practical amendments made by one of these, i.e. LISA (Library and Information Science Abstracts).

Design/methodology/approach

Database policies were established by e‐mail or through alternative sources, with 136 databases out of 187 exhaustively documented. Differences between 100 author‐supplied abstracts and the corresponding 100 LISA amended abstracts were classified into sentence‐level and beyond sentence‐level categories, and then as additions, deletions and rephrasing of text.

Findings

Revision of author abstracts was carried out by 66 databases, but in just 32 cases did it imply more than spelling, shortening of length and formula representation. In LISA, amendments were often non‐systematic and inconsistent, but still pointed to significant aspects which were discussed.

Originality/value

Amendments made by LISA editors are important in multi‐ and inter‐disciplinary research, since they tend to clarify certain aspects such as terminology, and suggest that abstracts should not always be considered as substitutes for the original document. From this point‐of‐view, the revision of abstracts can be considered as an important factor in enhancing a database's quality.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 59 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

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