Search results

1 – 4 of 4
Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Lisa Rossetti and Tony Wall

The role of dialogue has recently been identified as being important in generating impact in organisations, but the purposeful use of narrative or story-based approaches to effect…

6275

Abstract

Purpose

The role of dialogue has recently been identified as being important in generating impact in organisations, but the purposeful use of narrative or story-based approaches to effect organisational change and service improvement is still relatively innovative. The purpose of this paper is to document and examine two projects in health and social care settings which aim to generate organisational development and service improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper evaluates and compares two case studies of story-based organisational development and service improvement projects in the UK. This involved developing an appropriate evaluation framework and assessing the impacts in each case using semi-structured interviews and thematic content analysis.

Findings

This paper reports the diversity of impacts and outcomes that were generated by the projects. Specifically, it is argued that there is a strong indication that story-based projects best achieve their objectives when clearly linked to key organisational strategic drivers or pathways, as evidenced by robust evaluation.

Practical implications

This paper recommends that researchers and practitioners, working with story-based methods, design credible and robust evaluative practices, in order to evidence how their work supports organisations to meet current sector challenges. The paper recommends a flexible evaluation framework for evaluating story-based projects in the workplace.

Originality/value

This paper offers new evidence and insight into the impacts and outcomes of using story-based approaches, and a new evaluation framework for these sorts of projects.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Open Access

Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Shin-Ming Guo, Tienhua Wu and Yenming J. Chen

This study proposes the use of cumulative prospect theory (CPT) to predict over- and under-estimation of risks and the counteractive adjustment in a cold chain context. In…

Abstract

Purpose

This study proposes the use of cumulative prospect theory (CPT) to predict over- and under-estimation of risks and the counteractive adjustment in a cold chain context. In particular, the purpose of this paper is to address the importance of the socio-demographic characteristics of an individual in influencing risk attitude and the analysis of measurable risk probability.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses CPT as the basis to develop a decision analysis model in which the two functions of value editing and probability weighting are nonlinear to adequately determine the flexible risk attitudes of individuals, as well as their prospects with numerous outcomes and different probabilities. An experiment was conducted to obtain empirical predictions, and an efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm was applied to overcome the nonlinearity and dimensionality in the process of parameter estimation.

Findings

The respondents overweigh the minor cold chain risks with small probabilities and behave in a risk-averse manner, while underweighting major events with larger ones, thereby leading to risk-seeking behavior. Judgment distortion regarding probability was observed under risk decision with a low probability and a high impact. Moreover, the findings indicate that factors, such as gender, job familiarity and confidentiality significantly influence the risk attitudes and subjective probability weighting of the respondents.

Research limitations/implications

The findings fit the framework of CPT and extend this theory to deal with human risk attitudes and subjective bias in cold chains. In particular, this study enhances the literature by providing an analysis of cold chain risk from both the human decision-making and managerial perspectives. Moreover, this research determined the importance of the socio-demographic characteristics of an individual to explain the variability in risk attitudes and responses.

Practical implications

Managers must consider the issues of flexible risk attitude and subjective judgment when making choices for risk mitigation strategies. Given the focus on counteractive adjustment for over- and under-estimated risk, firms could evaluate cold chain risk more accurately, and thereby enhance their resilience to risky events while reducing the variability of their performance.

Originality/value

The current study is the first to materialize the phenomena of over- and under-estimation of cold chain risks, as well as to emphasize the different characteristics for loss aversion and judgment distortion at the individual level.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1978

The most obvious symptom of the most obvious trend in the building of new libraries is the fact that, as yet, no spade has entered the ground of the site on Euston Road, London…

Abstract

The most obvious symptom of the most obvious trend in the building of new libraries is the fact that, as yet, no spade has entered the ground of the site on Euston Road, London, upon which the new building for the British Library Reference Division has to be erected. Some twenty years of continued negotiation and discussion finally resulted in the choice of this site. The UK and much more of the world awaits with anticipation what could and should be the major building library of the twentieth century. The planning and design of a library building, however large or small, is, relatively speaking, a major operation, and deserves time, care and patience if the best results are to be produced.

Details

Library Review, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

1 – 4 of 4