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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2022

Masoud Karami, Yanto Chandra, Ben Wooliscroft and Lisa McNeill

Extant research has studied how entrepreneurial cognition influences firm international performance but what mechanisms translates entrepreneurial cognition into…

Abstract

Purpose

Extant research has studied how entrepreneurial cognition influences firm international performance but what mechanisms translates entrepreneurial cognition into international performance remains a puzzle in the field. In this paper, the authors utilize effectuation theory to theorize this association.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a survey of 164 internationalizing small firms from New Zealand, the authors examined a model of entrepreneurial cognition, action and gaining new knowledge as a framework to explain how effectual control, partnership for new opportunity creation and gaining new knowledge influence small firms' performance.

Findings

The authors found that partnership for new opportunity creation, and gaining new knowledge are two important mediation mechanisms in the focal association between effectual control and international performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study is a cross-sectional design. Considering the importance of time in cognition and action, future research should utilize longitudinal research design.

Practical implications

The authors’ findings provide implications for both small firms' managers and policymakers. These findings identify the critical importance of continuous knowledge development in internationalization process. Policymakers can help small firms gain more relevant and timely information about international markets and incorporate them in their decision-making to further develop international opportunities.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to international entrepreneurship research by delineating and verifying the important associations between entrepreneurial cognition, action and gaining new knowledge and their outcomes for firm's international performance. The authors also contribute to effectuation theory by elaborating on effectual control and how this logic leads to the development of new knowledge.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Lisa McNeill and Jacob McKay

The purpose of this study is to explore how fashion clothing is perceived and consumed by young males, what their attitudes are toward fashion and how fashion is used in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how fashion clothing is perceived and consumed by young males, what their attitudes are toward fashion and how fashion is used in the construction of a social identity by these men.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory approach is used in this research, with the fashion consumption behaviours and perceptions of males aged between 19 and 25 explored.

Findings

Results note the positive role of social comparison amongst young men in their fashion-seeking behaviour, with fashion consumption playing a large role in the emotional well-being of young men in a social context.

Research limitations/implications

This research was exploratory in nature and used a small sample of males from a specific age cohort. As such, the results cannot be generalized but do offer analytical insights into male attitudes and behaviour toward fashion that can be extended in future research.

Practical implications

While the act of shopping for clothing was traditionally seen as a female recreation, fragmentation of the traditional male/female dichotomy has seen men become active in the social consumption ethic surrounding fashion. The current study examines the emergence of fashion-aware males and offers insight into the key motivations for young males to seek out fashion products.

Social implications

In a society where fashion seeking is a popular recreational activity across genders and changing notions of masculinity allow for more appearance focused men, shopping for clothes is no longer considered an exclusively female activity.

Originality/value

Where research has previously examined fashion items and their integral role in product-self extension from a female perspective, very little studies focus on males’ relationships with fashion. Whilst prior research has examined men’s self-image and self-modification via exercise or plastic surgery, there is little that focuses on the role of clothing in men’s identity creation.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2021

Kim-Shyan Fam, James E. Richard, Lisa S. McNeill, David S. Waller and Honghong Zhang

This paper explores how consumer psychographics impact responses to sales promotions (SPs), and specifically whether equity sensitivity (ES) moderates attitudes towards…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores how consumer psychographics impact responses to sales promotions (SPs), and specifically whether equity sensitivity (ES) moderates attitudes towards sales promotion in the retail purchase experience (PE).

Design/methodology/approach

The study examines data from a survey of 284 Hong Kong consumers, using a shopping mall-intercept method. Every third person walking past the researchers was asked to participate in the survey. After obtaining their permission, those agreeing to take part in the study were surveyed either inside or outside of the shopping complex. The face-to-face intercept surveying method also increases confidence in sample and response reliability.

Findings

The study finds that ES has a significant positive relationship with evaluations of the retail PE. Consumers identified as “Benevolents” were significantly more positive towards SPs and reported significantly higher satisfaction with the PE. In contrast, consumers identified as “Entitled” were less positive towards SP and less satisfied with the PE. In addition, noncash SPs significantly positively influenced Benevolents' PE.

Research limitations/implications

The current study extends and expands equity theory and ES research by applying these concepts to consumer SPs. The study is limited to an examination of common consumer purchases, across different product categories and SP types. While this allows us to examine the relationship between SP attitudes, ES and purchase satisfaction, future comparisons between individual sales promotion techniques (SPTs) and specific consumer profiles are recommended.

Practical implications

From a retail perspective, it is important to understand individual differences and what influences and motivates the consumers' retail PE. Retail managers are advised to track customer purchases and satisfaction levels linked to SPs as this would allow for the identification of which customers are more likely to fit the Entitled or Benevolent psychological profiles and predict their likely responses to SP offers.

Originality/value

To date, there has been little research on individual psychological differences between consumers when offered SPs at retail stores. The current study contributes to the marketing literature by extending the price fairness equity model to the retail PE, thereby addressing a prominent gap in the literature.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Lisa S. McNeill

An individual’s identity is defined in the role that they devise for themselves, based on social positions. Examining identity motives can help in understanding what…

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Abstract

Purpose

An individual’s identity is defined in the role that they devise for themselves, based on social positions. Examining identity motives can help in understanding what influences one to take on a particular role. Self-esteem is one of the major motivational drivers in determining the role that an individual takes on. Individuals, through self-presentation, are said to be motivated to control the impressions others form of them. In this way, self-concept and fashion innovativeness are linked – with prior research suggesting that those with high levels of fashion innovativeness are also those with a strong sense of self. Where a gap remains, however, in exploring the direction of the relationship between self-concept and being more innovative and fashionable in clothing choices, as well as how individuals reflexively judge their own fashion choices against their perception of others – e.g. can you force yourself to be a fashion leader? The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes a lived experience approach to examine fashion as a tool in establishing social hierarchies amongst women. The study uses depth interviews with ten women to explore the developed self-concept of women actively engaged with fashion consumption.

Findings

The research presents a typology of fashion identities, exploring notions of security, dominance and innovativeness in self-fashioning using clothing.

Research limitations/implications

The research is exploratory, and limited to a sample of ten women. However, the study offers a number of key findings to drive future research in this area.

Practical implications

The research finds that both security of self-concept, in relation to fashion and general self-esteem, as well as insecurity, can motivate women towards fashion independence. This suggests that identity-based marketing is likely to be more successful than lifestyle-based marketing, when selling women’s fashion clothing.

Social implications

In prior research, self-concept and fashion innovativeness are linked – with prior research suggesting that those with high levels of fashion innovativeness are also those with a strong sense of self. This study finds that those with an insecure sense of self may also exhibit fashion independence, using fashion to acquire social capital.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates the concept that, unlike previous notions of fashion independence and engagement with fashion, these fashion-involved categorisations of behaviour are not always driven by sophistication, confidence, creativity and low fear of risk. Instead, this study has shown that fashion innovativeness can be motivated by an overarching fear of the outcomes of being judged unfashionable.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2013

Lisa McNeill

The purpose of this paper is to address the globalisation/culture issue by comparing two Asian countries in which there has been limited prior research regarding their…

6271

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the globalisation/culture issue by comparing two Asian countries in which there has been limited prior research regarding their respective supermarket industries, namely, Singapore and Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design adopted a case-study approach, with two general cases (the New Singaporean and Malaysian supermarket retail industries), made up of two embedded cases each (retailers and manufacturers operating within each country).

Findings

The overall finding is that despite prior assumptions that suitability is reliant on product type or country choice, there are a number of sales promotion techniques that are inherently suited to the supermarket industry as a whole. The majority of these “inherently suitable” techniques are price-based and the conclusion is then that these techniques can be used globally. Value-added techniques, on the other hand, should be localised to fit with the market in which they are being applied.

Practical implications

Tools best suited to the grocery product sales environment appear to be price-based or linked to price reductions (i.e. price discounting and discount-linked point-of-purchase (P-O-P) or end-of-aisle (E-O-A) displays combination and volume offers), suggesting that those tools which are inherently suitable to the industry are likely to meet retailers' shorter-term objectives rather than manufacturers' longer-term ones. The difficulty faced by manufacturers, then, is aligning their sales promotion objectives with the tools that are best able to achieve results in the supermarket environment.

Originality/value

Globalisation of the supermarket industry has also meant that marketers continue to need a better understanding of cross-cultural issues and their effect and national culture frameworks can be used to develop marketing theories which are suited to a particular region. The current research identifies preferences for different sales promotion techniques in the two nationally similar, yet ethnically diverse, countries under study, as well as examining application of these techniques in the retail environment.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Kim-Shyan Fam and Lisa S. McNeill

1857

Abstract

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Lisa S. McNeill and Lucy Turner

This paper aims not only to provide an insight into the nature of the relationship between parental financial role modelling and consumption behaviour of young people, but…

1435

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims not only to provide an insight into the nature of the relationship between parental financial role modelling and consumption behaviour of young people, but also to explore the consumer socialization process that children undergo in the parent‐child dyad.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research in the form of personal in‐depth interviews was conducted in order to extract new knowledge and reach a greater understanding regarding the impact that this relationship may have on future consumption behaviours within the youth market.

Findings

It is clear that parents are able to exert a huge amount of influence over the financial behaviour of their children (although this obviously differs between families) and are able to do so through the informal teaching of financial lessons, by allowing children to observe their own financial patterns and by guiding their children through significant financial decisions by offering advice and approval (or disapproval) when asked. Key financial attitudes and behaviours of young home‐leavers are almost directly related to the parental financial education they received whilst growing up and still living at home and in many cases parental influence is still present even once the child has moved away from home and is responsible for making their own financial decisions.

Research limitations/implications

Although there are limitations, the present study does have implications for the impact parents can have on the spending behaviour of their children; it may be that the most important thing parents can do is teach their children about financial responsibility and successful consumer decisions at a young age so that they grow up with these life skills.

Practical implications

In terms of practical implications, by identifying the specific areas where financial knowledge and awareness may be lacking, the research may help educational and financial institutions to design financial management courses in order to help young people achieve greater financial freedom.

Social implications

The paper reveals the characteristics of the consumption relationship children enjoy with their parents, describing the role of financial education within families and conceptualising the various forms of consumption relationships that exist between young consumers and their parents.

Originality/value

The relationship between parental influence and youth consumption behaviour has already been identified using quantitative research methods but very little is known about the actual extent of this relationship, which is addressed by this paper.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Ranga Chimhundu, Robert P. Hamlin and Lisa McNeill

This paper seeks to examine long‐term trends in retailer and manufacturer brand shares in grocery product categories, and to relate these trends to retailer category…

1361

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine long‐term trends in retailer and manufacturer brand shares in grocery product categories, and to relate these trends to retailer category strategy with regard to these two types of brand.

Design/methodology/approach

The study makes use of secondary data and empirical materials from the literature to establish and explain the trends in four countries: the UK, the USA, Australia, and New Zealand. Additionally, interview data are used to develop issues.

Findings

The results indicate the existence of long‐term equilibrium points between the shares of manufacturer brands and retailer brands in grocery product categories in the USA, New Zealand and Australia. Only the UK shows strong growth of retailer brands in line with retailer consolidation and power, but this trend is arrested, reversed and brought to equilibrium in 2001.

Research limitations/implications

The data presented are restricted to four major English‐speaking economies between 1992 and 2005. The data are also consolidated national data. Equilibria within individual categories will vary due to variations in category structure and pace of innovation.

Practical implications

This research indicates that major retailers deploy manufacturer brands to drive the categories via innovation and retailer brands to generate additional profit for the retailers. Therefore manufacturer brands do have a long‐term future. Individual manufacturer brands are likely to be assessed by the retailer primarily on this driving capability, and on the manufacturers' ongoing investment in the capacity to innovate that supports it.

Originality/value

The paper provides a fresh perspective of looking at retailer and manufacturer strategy via brand share trends.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

James O. Stanworth

The purpose of this paper is to identify distinguishing attributes of (dis)satisfying service contacts in a Chinese cultural context. Design/methodology/approach – The…

1304

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify distinguishing attributes of (dis)satisfying service contacts in a Chinese cultural context. Design/methodology/approach – The data were collected in the form of critical incidents from a purposive snowball sample of hypermarket customers. Analysis of the responses revealed 277 critical judgements related (dis)satisfying determinants.

Findings

Findings reveal 17 determinants with 37 sub‐determinants for all the experiences: five determinants relate to satisfactory evaluations, seven to dissatisfactory, and a further five to both. The determinants represent a marked departure from existing determinants of service quality described in the Western oriented literature.

Originality/value

The findings are related to Chinese (Confucian) culture to suggest determinants that can both develop and lead to termination of hypermarkets' relationships with their customers. A focus on the developers and terminators provides practical insights to foreign and indigenous managers of hypermarkets in the Far East for focus in service delivery.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 August 2008

Sarah Penman and Lisa S. McNeill

The purpose of this paper is to explore consumption habits of the young adult market, as they leave home and enter into a world of personal fiscal responsibility. Prior…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore consumption habits of the young adult market, as they leave home and enter into a world of personal fiscal responsibility. Prior research in this area is limited; however those studies, which have focused on young adult consumption have found increasing impulsive consumption and use of credit amongst this generation. This study seeks to extend research in this area by exploring further how young consumers are spending, their motivations for impulsive consumption choices and their attitudes towards debt.

Design/methodology/approach

The study in the paper is exploratory, and takes a qualitative approach to data collection and analysis. A two‐stage design is employed, consisting of focus groups with first and second‐year university students and in‐depth interviews with selected cases from these focus groups. The data collected are content‐analysed, with an emphasis on enlightening quotation from participants.

Findings

The paper finds that the young consumers studied show a relaxed attitude to debt and consumer purchasing, with non‐essential consumption seen as “deserved” and a “reward” for behaviour such as studying or working. Social pressure is found to be the key driver of consumption choices in this group, with the majority of spending decisions made impulsively.

Practical implications

The paper considers the influence of peers and society pressures as a whole in encouraging young adults develop particular consumption habits and attitudes to money and debt. It highlights key aspects of the “culture of consumption” that young consumers are part of today and indicates an attitude to debt that is quite different to generations before.

Originality/value

The paper shows that where consumption habits are the focus of numerous consumer behaviour studies, far fewer studies concentrate on how these consumption habits are developed. The study adds to existing knowledge on the development of consumption norms by considering the practises of the youth market as they leave home and begin making purchasing decisions away from parental influence.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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