Search results

1 – 10 of 314
Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2012

Lisa M. Campbell, Bethany J. Haalboom and Jennie Trow

In developing country contexts, it has become difficult to imagine the word ‘conservation’ without ‘community’ sitting alongside it, as their combination is part of the…

Abstract

In developing country contexts, it has become difficult to imagine the word ‘conservation’ without ‘community’ sitting alongside it, as their combination is part of the international conservation and development lexicon. Community-based conservation (CBC) encompasses several core principles, including: involving communities in decision-making; devolving control over resource management; developing community institutions for management; incorporating traditional or local knowledge; legitimising community property rights; linking environment and development objectives and providing incentives for conservation (Barrow & Murphree, 2001; Kellert, Mehta, Ebbin, & Litchtenfeld, 2000; Songorwa, 1999; Western & Wright, 1994). All of these are employed with the aims of overcoming the limitations associated with traditional ‘top-down’ approaches to conservation (Adams & Hulme, 2001; Campbell, 2002a). Ideally, CBC should benefit both people and environments, contributing to both development and conservation. In this way CBC is directly aligned to wider discourses of sustainability and to innovations in the field of conserving natural resources.

Details

Enterprising Communities: Grassroots Sustainability Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-484-9

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1973

The group meetings have continued regularly since the last Report appeared. Several members from the earliest days are still present at most meetings, but new members have…

Abstract

The group meetings have continued regularly since the last Report appeared. Several members from the earliest days are still present at most meetings, but new members have also been welcomed. The meetings continue to be the ideal medium for refurbishing old ideas, or trying out new ones, however outrageous, in a spirit of cheerful goodwill. There have been frequent visitors, many from overseas, and if they are unprepared they may find the rapid changes of discussion somewhat bewildering. Among the visitors who made special contributions have been: Mrs J. Aitchison, who described her thesaurofacet scheme for the English Electric Co.; Dr Perreault (Director of Libraries, University of Alabama in Huntsville), who discussed the relations between philosophy and science; Mr Bhattacharya (Documentation Research and Training Centre, Bangalore), who described the work of the Centre (established by Ranganathan in 1962); and Dr H. Borko (University of Southern California) who gave a wonderfully clear account of his work on automated classification.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Lisa Fortini‐Campbell

This book has two target markets. When aimed at the college textbook market, it is entitled The Consumer Insight Workbook. However, based on the central theme of the…

1828

Abstract

This book has two target markets. When aimed at the college textbook market, it is entitled The Consumer Insight Workbook. However, based on the central theme of the book—obtain consumer insights so as to make informed marketing decisions—the trade version is named Hitting The Sweet Spot. The content in both is the same, so why dual titles? The thinking is that marketing professionals understand and relate to the latter title, but it would be inappropriate for the college market.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Lisa Campbell and Edward Finch

Applies organisational justice theory to facilities management with the aim of increasing customer satisfaction with the service received. Provides an overview of…

9914

Abstract

Applies organisational justice theory to facilities management with the aim of increasing customer satisfaction with the service received. Provides an overview of organisational justice theory, and reviews the numerous different forms that this may take. Although there is strong theoretical support for participative decision making, in practice it often leads to conflict and delays. Two‐way communication appears to represent the most effective form. The conclusions are based upon theoretical support as well as semi‐structured interviews and observations in an organisational setting. The conclusions drawn do not have the benefits of more objective quantitative research methods. Contributes to practical understanding of how to maintain customer satisfaction in the facilities management industry and the theoretical reasons why the proposed methods will be effective. Argues that the impact of organisational justice on employee satisfaction can be applied to customer satisfaction with specific reference to facilities management.

Details

Facilities, vol. 22 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2012

Anna Davies

As the first decade of the 21st century drew to a close, the threats associated with economic crises, social inequalities, and human-induced environmental change focused…

Abstract

As the first decade of the 21st century drew to a close, the threats associated with economic crises, social inequalities, and human-induced environmental change focused unprecedented attention on global development trajectories. While questions about how the nature and impact of economic growth should be managed have long featured in environmentalist thought, the stark conditions created a new policy landscape of opportunity for alternative development strategies. National governments around the globe began to disseminate policy statements calling for ‘green growth’ and some, for example the United States, even developed stimulus packages aimed at restructuring economies towards a low carbon future. At the same time international non-governmental organisations such as the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) have developed entire initiatives focused on shaping what has come to be termed the ‘green economy’ (UNEP, 2011). Even large multinational corporations, such as Shell and their dialogues mechanism, are engaging with green economy discourses. New partnerships are emerging across governance sectors with Microsoft Corp and UNEP signing an agreement in 2009 to share knowledge collaboratively around green economy issues. In the United States, the BlueGreen Alliance is consolidating activity of labour unions and environmental organisations in order to maximise the number and quality of jobs in the green economy. With such a broad spectrum of actors and interests involved, it is unsurprising that there is no one agreed vision for a green economy. Some argue for development scenarios that promote reduced or no-growth pathways (Scott-Cato, 2009), others see the current crises creating innovation opportunities for new growth in different areas through processes of ‘creative destruction’ (Florida, 2010).

Details

Enterprising Communities: Grassroots Sustainability Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-484-9

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2012

Abstract

Details

Enterprising Communities: Grassroots Sustainability Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-484-9

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Marie McCaig, Lisa McNay, Glenn Marland, Simon Bradstreet and Jim Campbell

The purpose of this paper is to describe the establishment of the Dumfries and Galloway Wellness and Recovery College (The College) within the University of the West of…

186

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the establishment of the Dumfries and Galloway Wellness and Recovery College (The College) within the University of the West of Scotland.

Design/methodology/approach

A narrative approach is taken to outline the project and justify its philosophy.

Findings

Progress so far is outlined and the vision for the future is explained.

Social implications

It is believed that stigma and discrimination are pernicious and pervasive and a concerted and deliberately conscious attempt is needed to establish an inclusive, egalitarian and aligned approach whereby practices match values base.

Originality/value

This is justified as being in keeping with a philosophy based on the concepts of recovery, co-production co-delivery and co-receiving. Although not without precedent this development is innovative in being embedded within the university sector and challenging existing paradigms in terms of the positive and inclusive approach to mental health.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Melissa Wetzel, James V. Hoffman, Beth Maloch, Saba Khan Vlach, Laura A. Taylor, Natalie Sue Svrcek, Samuel Dejulio, Ashley Martinez and Haylee Lavender

The purpose of this paper is to disrupt traditional, separate roles in preservice teacher (PT) education, moving toward hybrid mentoring spaces, which is practice-based…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to disrupt traditional, separate roles in preservice teacher (PT) education, moving toward hybrid mentoring spaces, which is practice-based and a collaborative model of supporting PTs into teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

Design-based research was collaboratively enacted by a research team. The authors focused analysis on video-recorded collaborative coaching conferences, as well as shared discussions of those conferences between researchers, cooperating teachers (CTs) and field supervisors (FSs). At each of three iterations of coaching conversations, changes were made to the practice of collaborative coaching, allowing the research/design team to reflect upon practices and deepen the understanding of the development of design principles.

Findings

Three design principles of collaborative coaching grew through this research – a need for shared understanding and valuing of a coaching model amongst participants to guide decision making; a partnership between CTs and FSs in centering the PTs’ reflection on problems of practice, including the need for CTs and FSs to continually reflect on how their shifting roles toward this goal; and a relational framework including transparent communication. The authors extend these principles through two narrative vignettes and a framework that focuses on hybrid spaces for coaching.

Research limitations/implications

The research questions and design did not inquire into the relationship between collaborative coaching and PTs’ teaching practices.

Practical implications

Each narrative serves as a coaching model of how PTs, CTs and FSs, or triads, worked toward resolving practical challenges in coaching to better support PTs. The authors provide practical tools for teacher preparation programs to build collaborative relationships with teachers and schools.

Originality/value

Placing the PT into an active, leadership role in reflection on practice disrupts expert-novice and other binaries that may not serve programs that seek to prepare reflective practitioners. Previous studies have identified tensions when mentoring is not a collective process, but few studies have explored models that disrupt the two activity systems that often operate separately.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Mary Dana Laird, James J. Zboja, Paul Harvey, Lisa M. Victoravich and Anupama Narayan

Guided by Hobfoll’s (1989) conservation of resources theory, we examined how psychological entitlement moderates the negative relationship between work-family conflict…

Abstract

Purpose

Guided by Hobfoll’s (1989) conservation of resources theory, we examined how psychological entitlement moderates the negative relationship between work-family conflict (WFC) and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 119 accountants from the Midwestern United States, we tested our hypotheses with hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

Results indicate a strong, negative relationship between WFC and job satisfaction for employees low in psychological entitlement, but an insignificant relationship for entitled employees.

Practical implications

The results suggest that some entitlement may be beneficial to employees when coping with WFC. However, organizations should limit WFC in order to foster their least entitled employees’ job satisfaction.

Originality/value

This is the first study that investigates how psychological entitlement affects employees' reactions to WFC. Not only does it contribute to the growing body of research that examines how this individual difference affects workplace functioning, but it suggests there may be some benefits to entitlement, which largely has been disparaged.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 November 2017

Naomi Nichols, Alison Griffith and Mitchell McLarnon

In this chapter, we explore the use of participatory and community-based research (CBR) strategies within institutional ethnography. Reflecting on our current, past, and…

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore the use of participatory and community-based research (CBR) strategies within institutional ethnography. Reflecting on our current, past, and future projects, we discuss the utility of community-based and participatory methods for grounding one’s research in the actualities of participants’ lives. At the same time, we note ontological and practical differences between most community-based participatory action research (PAR) methodologies and institutional ethnography. While participants’ lives and experiences ground both approaches, people’s perspectives are not considered as research findings for institutional ethnographers. In an institutional ethnography, the objects of analysis are the institutional relations, which background and give shape to people’s actualities. The idea is to discover something through the research process that is useful to participants. As such, the use of community-based and participatory methods during analysis suggests the greatest utility of this sociological approach for people.

Details

Perspectives on and from Institutional Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-653-2

Keywords

1 – 10 of 314