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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Nadia Brookes, Sinead Palmer and Lisa Callaghan

The purpose of this paper is to report on the views and experiences of older people using Shared Lives (adult placement) in 2012/2013.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the views and experiences of older people using Shared Lives (adult placement) in 2012/2013.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a survey collecting information about outcomes for older users of Shared Lives issues of whether it had made a difference to quality of life, and positive and negative experiences of support were explored.

Findings

Questionnaires were returned by 150 older people using Shared Lives services. Findings suggest that this model of community-based support has a number of advantages for some older people, such as reducing social isolation and loneliness, promoting independence, choice and control, providing emotional support and increased well-being.

Research limitations/implications

The questionnaire was self-completed and so responses were not followed up to provide deeper insights.

Practical implications

Shared Lives is not appropriate for everyone but it is suggested that this option should form part of local commissioning strategies, be part of a range of options for social care practitioners to consider in their work with older people and helps to meet various current policy imperatives.

Originality/value

The potential of Shared Lives for older people is under-researched and this paper contributes to the literature in exploring the views of older people about family-based support in the community.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2011

Robin Darton, Theresia Bäumker, Lisa Callaghan and Ann Netten

This paper describes an evaluation of 19 extra care schemes allocated funding from the Extra Care Housing Fund.

407

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes an evaluation of 19 extra care schemes allocated funding from the Extra Care Housing Fund.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviewers collected information about the expectations and experiences of 1,182 new residents, and demographic and care needs information for those who received a care assessment (817 individuals) to correspond to previous surveys of care homes. Follow‐up information was collected at six, 18 and 30 months. Comprehensive costs were estimated for individuals based on capital costs, care and support costs and living expenses.

Findings

Entrants to extra care were much less physically and cognitively impaired, on average, than entrants to care homes, although residents in several schemes had high levels of physical disability. Overall, residents appeared to have made a positive choice to live in a more supportive and social environment (“pull” factors) rather than responding to a crisis (“push” factors). Outcomes, in terms of physical and cognitive functioning, for residents with similar characteristics to care home residents were better, and costs were no higher, while mortality rates were lower.

Research limitations/implications

Outcomes could not be measured for those who dropped out, and residents with deteriorating mental health were more likely to drop out.

Practical implications

Extra care can provide a positive option for people planning ahead, but appears to be less suitable for crisis moves. Further work is needed on supporting those who are more dependent.

Social implications

To encourage downsizing, extra care needs to be sufficiently attractive to those making a lifestyle choice.

Originality/value

This was the first major study of costs and outcomes in extra care housing.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Stamatios Papadakis

This study, by critically analyzing material from multiple sources, aims to provide an overview of what is available on evaluation tools for educational apps for children…

Abstract

Purpose

This study, by critically analyzing material from multiple sources, aims to provide an overview of what is available on evaluation tools for educational apps for children. To realize this objective, a systematic literature review was conducted to search all English literature published after January 2010 in multiple electronic databases and internet sources. Various combinations of search strings were used due to database construction differences, while the results were cross-referenced to discard repeated references, obtaining those that met the criteria for inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study was conducted according to the methods provided by Khan et al. (2003) and Thomé et al. (2016). The whole procedure included four stages: planning the review, identifying relevant studies in the literature, critical analysis of the literature, summarizing and interpreting the findings (Figure 1). Furthermore, in this analysis, a well-known checklist, PRISMA, was also used as a recommendation (Moher et al., 2015).

Findings

These review results reveal that, although there are several evaluation tools, in their majority they are not considered adequate to help teachers and parents to evaluate the pedagogical affordances of educational apps correctly and easily. Indeed, most of these tools are considered outdated. With the emergence of new issues such as General Data Protection Regulation, the quality criteria and methods for assessing children's products need to be continuously updated and adapted (Stoyanov et al., 2015). Some of these tools might be considered as good beginnings, but their “limited dimensions make generalizable considerations about the worth of apps” (Cherner, Dix and Lee, 2014, p. 179). Thus, there is a strong need for effective evaluation tools to help parents and teachers when choosing educational apps (Callaghan and Reich, 2018).

Research limitations/implications

Even though this work is performed by following the systematic mapping guideline, threats to the validity of the results presented still exist. Although custom strings that contained a rich collection of data were used to search for papers, potentially relevant publications that would have been missed by the advanced search might exist. It is recommended that at least two different reviewers should independently review titles, abstracts and later full papers for exclusion (Thomé et al., 2016). In this study, only one reviewer – the author – selected the papers and did the review. In the case of a single researcher, Kitchenham (2004) recommends that the single reviewer should consider discussing included and excluded papers with an expert panel. The researcher, following this recommendation, discussed the inclusion and exclusion procedure with an expert panel of two professionals with research experience from the Department of (removed for blind review). To deal with publication bias, the researcher in conjunction with the expert panel used the search strategies identified by Kitchenham (2004) including: Grey literature, conference proceedings, communicating with experts working in the field for any unpublished literature.

Practical implications

The purpose of this study was not to advocate any evaluation tool. Instead, the study aims to make parents, educators and software developers aware of the various evaluation tools available and to focus on their strengths, weaknesses and credibility. This study also highlights the need for a standardized app evaluation (Green et al., 2014) via reliable tools, which will allow anyone interested to evaluate apps with relative ease (Lubniewski et al., 2018). Parents and educators need a reliable, fast and easy-to-use tool for the evaluation of educational apps that is more than a general guideline (Lee and Kim, 2015). A new generation of evaluation tools would also be used as a reference among the software developers, designers to create educational apps with real educational value.

Social implications

The results of this study point to the necessity of creating new evaluation tools based on research, either in the form of rubrics or checklists to help educators and parents to choose apps with real educational value.

Originality/value

However, to date, no systematic review has been published summarizing the available app evaluation tools. This study, by critically analyzing material from multiple sources, aims to provide an overview of what is available on evaluation tools for educational apps for children.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 March 2022

Megan Middlemiss, Lisa Caygill, Sarah Craven-Staines and Joyce Powell

Exposure to trauma in childhood can have lasting impacts upon development and psychological well-being. Services can be sought to help young people heal from their…

Abstract

Purpose

Exposure to trauma in childhood can have lasting impacts upon development and psychological well-being. Services can be sought to help young people heal from their experiences; however, literature suggests that their care may not always be trauma-informed. This paper aims to generate a theory to explain caregivers’ experiences of accessing mental health and therapeutic services for young people exposed to developmental trauma.

Design/methodology/approach

A constructivist grounded theory approach was used, using an iterative process of data collection and analysis. Nine individuals including foster carers, adoptive parents and a special guardian were interviewed following purposive and theoretical sampling. Techniques of initial, focused and theoretical coding, alongside constant comparative analysis were used to develop the end theory.

Findings

The theory demonstrates that multiple factors can impact upon caregivers’ experiences when accessing support for young people exposed to trauma. Six themes emerged documenting caregivers’ journeys from the decision to seek support to the ending of service involvement. Barriers, challenges and positive experiences are described. Results are contextualised through consideration of wider organisations and systems.

Originality/value

The theory highlights challenges caregivers face when accessing mental health and therapeutic support for young people exposed to developmental trauma. It provides new insights into what caregivers consider to be trauma-informed experiences of care in these settings. Tentative recommendations are provided in the hope of improving future care.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 April 2022

Elizabeth M. Miller

To create circular economies, we need supply systems to convey materials between their use lives. Often, though, it is not possible to control an entire supply network…

Abstract

To create circular economies, we need supply systems to convey materials between their use lives. Often, though, it is not possible to control an entire supply network. Without a coordinator to implement circular economy principles, how can circular supply systems come to be? This chapter sets out to build on complex adaptive systems (CAS) theory and circular economy research to conceptualize how information flows between actors can facilitate the emergence of a circular supply system. It begins by outlining why a supply network can be considered a CAS, as well as the CAS progression from information to adaptation to emergence. Next, it argues that information on local supply networks, extended supply systems, and biosphere impacts is particularly important for circular production. Finally, it concludes with two potential types of emergence that can stem from these information flows: (1) new actor roles and networks and (2) new spatial and temporal patterns. Ultimately, this conceptual overview aims to give researchers and practitioners a CAS frame for thinking about how continual adaptation to information flows can enable change toward circular supply systems.

Details

Circular Economy Supply Chains: From Chains to Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-545-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Angela Ayios and Lisa Harris

The aim of this paper is to investigate whether technological developments can be used in call centre environments to build trust and hence lasting customer relationships…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate whether technological developments can be used in call centre environments to build trust and hence lasting customer relationships beyond the usual focus on efficiency gains through automation.

Design/methodology/approach

Draws upon depth interviews with management and staff in three very different types of call centre to critically examine the ways in which caring attitudes and competent behaviour of call centre staff can contribute to building durable bases for customer trust.

Findings

While one of the case studies exemplifies a purely economic rationale for call centre operations, the other two demonstrate that a truly optimal application of technology creates a shared system of which customers and employees form an integrated part. Employees' knowledge of the system and the product it underpins are applied in a positive way to create relationships and trust with the customers with whom they transact.

Practical implications

Argues that competitive advantage can be gained if the customer perception is of an organisation that is concerned with building relationships based on competence or empathy to meet individual needs – features which stand out clearly in an industry sector often associated with standardised services, “sweatshop” working conditions and control‐based management practices focused on a purely economic rationale.

Originality/value

Demonstrates that multi‐channel environments for customer interaction offer potential for competitive advantage beyond short‐term efficiency gains when the convenience of channel choice is creatively combined with competent and empathetic customer service.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

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Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Mike Finn

Abstract

Details

British Universities in the Brexit Moment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-742-5

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 1 May 2009

Abstract

Details

Extending Schumacher's Concept of Total Accounting and Accountability into the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-301-9

Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Charlotte Ryan and Gregory Squires

We argue that by conducting systematic research with communities rather than on communities, community-based research (CBR) methods can both advance the study of human…

Abstract

We argue that by conducting systematic research with communities rather than on communities, community-based research (CBR) methods can both advance the study of human interaction and strengthen public understanding and appreciation of social sciences. CBR, among other methods, can also address social scientists’ ethical and social commitments. We recap the history of calls by leading sociologists for rigorous, empirical, community-engaged research. We introduce CBR methods as empirically grounded methods for conducting social research with social actors. We define terms and describe the range of methods that we include in the umbrella term, “community-based research.” After providing exemplars of community-based research, we review CBR’s advantages and challenges. We, next, summarize an intervention that we undertook as members of the Publication Committee of the URBAN Research Network’s Sociology section in which the committee developed and disseminated guidelines for peer review of community-based research. We also share initial responses from journal editors. In the conclusion, we revisit the potential of community-based research and note the consequences of neglecting community-based research traditions.

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