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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Tony Wall

Abstract

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Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Sarah Tudor and Ruth Helyer

Abstract

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Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Book part
Publication date: 21 July 2005

Lisa R. Anderson, Jennifer M. Mellor and Jeffrey Milyo

We test whether party affiliation or ideological leanings influence subjects' behavior in public goods experiments and trust games. In general, party is unrelated to…

Abstract

We test whether party affiliation or ideological leanings influence subjects' behavior in public goods experiments and trust games. In general, party is unrelated to behavior, and ideology is not related to contributions in the public goods experiment. However, there is some evidence that self-described liberals are both more trusting and more trustworthy.

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Experimental and Behavorial Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-194-1

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Book part
Publication date: 15 November 2017

Connie Snyder Mick and James M. Frabutt

Within tertiary education, service-learning can offer deeply engaging and transformational experiences for students, broadening their consideration of a host of social…

Abstract

Within tertiary education, service-learning can offer deeply engaging and transformational experiences for students, broadening their consideration of a host of social justice issues of our time, including diversity and inclusion. This chapter describes how service-learning interfaces with two areas in particular, both of which have wide-ranging public health implications and are generally misrepresented in public media: poverty and mental health. Representative studies are highlighted and case examples are presented in each domain, concluding with recommendations for future research. The authors argue that service-learning courses addressing social justice issues such as poverty and mental health can lead to deep learning in students if they are sequenced to include both direct service-learning that concretizes the issue and community-based research that highlights the public policy challenges and implications of addressing that issue systemically.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Jean Clarke, Richard Thorpe, Lisa Anderson and Jeff Gold

The purpose of this paper is to argue that action learning (AL) may provide a means of successfully developing small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that action learning (AL) may provide a means of successfully developing small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

The literature around SME learning suggests a number of processes are important for SME learning which similarity, it is argued, are encompassed in AL. AL may therefore offer a means of developing SME. This argument is then supported through the results of a longitudinal qualitative evaluation study conducted in the north‐west of England, which involved the use of AL in 100 SMEs.

Findings

The paper finds that the discursive and critical reflection aspects of the set environment appeared to be of great utility and importance to the SMEs. Sets also had an optimum level of which helped them find “common ground”. Once common ground was established set members often continued to network and form alliances outside of the set environment. SME owner‐managers could discuss both personal and business. Finally, AL offered the opportunity to take time out of the business and “disengage” with the operational allowing them to become more strategic.

Practical implications

In this paper both the literature review and the results of the evaluation suggest AL may offer a means of engaging SMEs in training, which is relevant and useful to them. AL offers a way for policy makers and support agencies to get involved with SME management development while retaining context and naturalistic conditions.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to move beyond other articles which assess SME response to government initiatives, through examining the literature around SME learning and constructing a rationale which proposes that AL encompasses many of the learning processes suggested in the literature as effective for SME development.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Lisa Anderson and Richard Thorpe

This article discusses the role of criticality in action learning and in Master's level management education; examines approaches to developing criticality through social…

Abstract

This article discusses the role of criticality in action learning and in Master's level management education; examines approaches to developing criticality through social constructionist approaches to learning and illustrates how a heightened consciousness of language use by managers can be used to develop critical reflection. Examines critical management pedagogy and critical reflection and their relationship to action learning. Discusses the nature of Master's level management education and the role of criticality in the pursuit of “scholarship”. Reviews social constructionist approaches to management learning and examines the use of critical management language in a Master's programme at a UK university. Shows how social constructionist approaches to management development can lead to critical reflection. This was a regional sample, requiring more geographical coverage. Provides information and ideas for management developers using action learning who wish to develop critical thinking. Gives a new and additional perspective on social constructionist approaches to learning.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 28 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2011

Jeff Gold, John Walton, Peter Cureton and Lisa Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to argue that abductive reasoning is a typical but usually unrecognised process used by HRD scholars and practitioners alike.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that abductive reasoning is a typical but usually unrecognised process used by HRD scholars and practitioners alike.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that explores recent criticism of traditional views of theory‐building, based on the privileging of scientific theorising, which has led to a relevance gap between scholars and practitioners. The work of Charles Sanders Peirce and the varieties of an abductive reasoning process are considered.

Findings

Abductive reasoning, which precedes induction and deduction, provide a potential connection with HRD practitioners who face difficult problems. Two types of abductive reasoning are explored – existential and analogic. Both offer possibilities for theorising with HRD practitioners. A range of methods for allowing abduction to become more evident with practitioners are presented. The authors consider how abduction can be used in engaged and participative research strategies.

Research limitations/implications

While this is a conceptual paper, it does suggest implications for engagement and participation in theorising with HRD practitioners.

Practical implications

Abductive reasoning adds to the repertoire of HRD scholars and practitioners.

Originality/value

The paper elucidates the value of abductive reasoning and points to how it can become an integral element of theory building in HRD.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Jeannette Oppedisano and Kenneth Laird

This article presents a pedagogical model that utilizes students as primary researchers in the identification, interviewing, and then reporting on women entrepreneurs as a…

Abstract

This article presents a pedagogical model that utilizes students as primary researchers in the identification, interviewing, and then reporting on women entrepreneurs as a major component of a multidisciplinary entrepreneurship course. The purpose of the course is to attract students who may not be familiar with the entrepreneurship concept itself, the role of women in such economic ventures, or the possibilities for people like themselves in such a career avenue. Students are exposed to the accomplishments of women entrepreneurs throughout U.S. history in the broad categories of agriculture and mining; construction; communication; manufacturing; service (both for profit and not-for-profit); transportation; and wholesale and retail trade. This content experience is then enhanced by the studentsʼ own direct interaction with and interviewing of women entrepreneurs. The implementation, potential outcomes, and possible adaptations of the course are described, and this transformational learning process model is illustrated.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Book part
Publication date: 21 July 2005

Abstract

Details

Experimental and Behavorial Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-194-1

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Book part
Publication date: 21 July 2005

Abstract

Details

Experimental and Behavorial Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-194-1

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