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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Lis Bates

The purpose of this paper is to address an emerging international debate about the involvement of females in perpetrating honour-based abuse (HBA). Presenting new empirical data…

1026

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address an emerging international debate about the involvement of females in perpetrating honour-based abuse (HBA). Presenting new empirical data, this study profiles the different roles played by women, discussing them in relation to gender and their relationships to victims, and argues that acknowledgement of female perpetrators does not fundamentally challenge a gendered interpretation of HBA.

Design/methodology/approach

Some 1,474 case files flagged as HBA were gathered from one police force in Southern England and 50 domestic abuse agencies across England and Wales. Descriptive statistics explored which victim, perpetrator and abuse characteristics were associated with female perpetration. Case narratives were thematically analysed to profile the different roles females played. Findings were explored in eight key informant interviews with caseworkers from the services data came from.

Findings

This paper finds that: females are more involved in perpetrating HBA than other forms of domestic abuse, but primary perpetrators are still mostly male; victims are overwhelmingly female; the context for abuse is the maintenance of patriarchal values on gender roles; female perpetrator roles vary, meriting further exploration; and female perpetrators can be conceptualised within a gendered framework.

Originality/value

This paper presents important new empirical data to advance the debate on the role of women in perpetrating HBA. It will be of interest to academics, researchers, policy-makers, and practitioners alike.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 December 2004

Joan C. Durrance

Libraries and librarians have long been early adopters of information technologies. For decades, librarians have applied computerization to library operations. Standardization and…

Abstract

Libraries and librarians have long been early adopters of information technologies. For decades, librarians have applied computerization to library operations. Standardization and computerization of bibliographic records decades ago made possible automation of library systems, the creation and utilization of giant bibliographic utilities such as OCLC with its 52 million records. Collaborative adoption of information technologies decades ago brought shared cataloging, on-line public access catalogs, bibliographic databases, enhanced interlibrary loan and document delivery, and acquisition of information in digital formats, resulting in worldwide access to library resources. Nonetheless the revolution in information technologies that produced the World Wide Web in the mid-1990s hit the information profession of librarianship and the educational establishment like an earthquake.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-005-0

Abstract

Details

European Origins of Library and Information Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-718-4

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Jessica Bates

2453

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 62 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2022

Iulian Vamanu and Micaela Terronez

This paper explores informational dimensions of dancing by focusing on the cases of two folk dance groups practicing Mexican ballet folklórico in the US.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores informational dimensions of dancing by focusing on the cases of two folk dance groups practicing Mexican ballet folklórico in the US.

Design/methodology/approach

Thematic analysis of (1) extensive recollections from one of the study's coauthors, an academic librarian who was an active member of a ballet folklórico group; (2) an interview with that coauthor's brother, who is the current director of this school; and (3) instructional and demonstrative videos posted on YouTube by two US-based ballet folklórico groups.

Findings

Ballet folklórico dancers must use a wide range of information. The most important is sociocultural information, which expert dancers display while dancing and help novices acquire as enacted, expressed, or recorded information. According to expert dancers, sociocultural information becomes increasingly embodied through repeated enactment and constant interaction with ambient information. Specifically, ambient information provides parameters that both enable and limit the performance of the dance.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the emergent Library and Information Science (LIS) literature on dancing and its informational aspects.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 78 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Andrew K. Shenton and Naomi V. Hay‐Gibson

The purpose of this paper is to explore meta‐models that pertain to information behaviour. It seeks to highlight the possibilities they offer to researchers wishing to develop…

1792

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore meta‐models that pertain to information behaviour. It seeks to highlight the possibilities they offer to researchers wishing to develop their own and to readers more generally interested in information behaviour literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Various frameworks that may be regarded as information behaviour meta‐models were examined and three separate types were identified. These are discussed in turn, with particular characteristics of individual meta‐models used to illustrate the types.

Findings

A meta‐model is considered here to be a model that has been derived from one or more existing models. Information behaviour meta‐models fall into three categories: those that unify, within one framework, disparate models/theories from a number of areas; those that integrate the fundamentals of several models which share common strands; and those that recast an established model for a particular purpose.

Research limitations/implications

The extent of the typology presented in the paper is bound by the limits of the authors' endeavours in uncovering relevant meta‐models. Should further meta‐models be traced, it is possible that other types would also come to light.

Originality/value

The work will aid the reader's understanding of how theoretical frameworks in information behaviour are developed. It will help those who study the field's literature to grasp variations in the origin of the individual models they see, by demonstrating that models may be derived from others in different ways. It will also enable readers intent on constructing their own models to understand some of the courses of action open to them.

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Christopher Peter Lueg

The purpose of this paper is to highlight findings regarding human perception in allied disciplines and to argue that information behaviour research needs to find ways to address…

2054

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight findings regarding human perception in allied disciplines and to argue that information behaviour research needs to find ways to address human characteristics that imply that: first, subjects are likely to fail to recognize information that is present in an environment and potentially relevant to a task at hand; and second, subjects would not be able to report on the fact that they failed to recognize the information. The authors also discuss as to how information behaviour research can address the aforementioned challenges resulting from human movement and perception.

Design/methodology/approach

The author draws on the literature primarily in cognitive science and psychology to highlight the findings that are most relevant to the scientific study of information behaviour, to develop a model of the information environment in which information behaviour is situated, and to critically examine how data is collected in information behaviour research. Ways to provide more comprehensive information about information behaviour are also discussed.

Findings

The literature in cognitive science and psychology suggests that failing to notice information relevant to a task at hand may not be the exception but to be expected, and needs to be taken into account by information behaviour researchers. Popular data collection methods including questionnaires and interviews do not pick that up because subjects would not be aware of the fact which means in turn that they cannot articulate the fact either. This suggests that: first, current models of information behaviour focus too much on one side of the coin; and second, information behaviour researchers may need to complement their data collection methods with data collection methods such as gaze tracking.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual paper based on the careful analysis of relevant research primarily in cognitive science and psychology. Relating theory to practice provides a strong indication of the general validity of the findings but there may be other aspects that have not been covered as yet.

Originality/value

The paper is unique in that it critically reviews information behaviour research from a human perception and movement point of view. There have been papers criticizing information behaviour research from a methodological point of view. This paper adds to that body of work and proposes a way forward.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 70 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Jackie MacDonald, Peter Bath and Andrew Booth

The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into managers' decision‐making practices when challenged by inappropriate information quality, and to test frameworks developed from…

4245

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into managers' decision‐making practices when challenged by inappropriate information quality, and to test frameworks developed from research to see whether they apply to these managers.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory, multiple case study used the critical incident technique in 19 semi‐structured interviews. Responses were analyzed using framework analysis, a matrix‐based content analysis technique, and then considered with respect to the research literature on information overload, information poverty and satisficing.

Findings

The managers in this study tended to satisfice (terminate the search process and make a good enough decision, while recognizing that information gaps remain). Those challenged by too little information appear to fit descriptions of information poverty, while others described aspects of information overload.

Research limitations/implications

A shortage of information behavior research on managers makes it difficult to conclude whether these results are typical of managers in general or of healthcare services managers specifically. Further research is needed to confirm initial findings and address questions suggested by this paper.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that existing definitions for the concepts of information poverty and information overload can be used to describe managers' experiences.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to what is known about information behavior in managers in general and healthcare services managers specifically. It may serve as an example of how to consider new research findings within existing frameworks.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 67 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Keren Dali

The purpose of this paper is to examine the reasons for the gradual extinction of reading scholarship in Library and Information Science (LIS) departments and to identify three…

1066

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the reasons for the gradual extinction of reading scholarship in Library and Information Science (LIS) departments and to identify three problematic areas accounting for its dropping prestige: paradigmatic conflicts, the influence of the corporate university and low awareness of the potential of reading research. It also proposes possible solutions to each problem.

Design/methodology/approach

Close reading and analysis of an extensive selection of sources with novel conceptualization and critical perspectives.

Findings

The information science paradigm, which has dominated LIS, is not sufficient to accommodate reading research. The information science model has a detrimentally restrictive effect on reading scholarship. Library science, which should be considered an autonomous discipline rather than an appendix of information science, is more conducive to the study of reading. Non-specialization-based academic hiring to increase values-based diversity in LIS through a larger influx of reading scholars is advocated.

Originality/value

Reading scholarship, unduly deemed “old-fashioned”, or euphemistically “traditional”, is one of the most potent areas of academic inquiry, to which LIS scholars are perfectly positioned to make a unique contribution. Reading research in LIS has great merit irrespective of its connection to information and technology; a set of evaluative questions to determine the quality of reading scholarship is introduced. Using a case study, the paper illustrates the potential of reading research for interdisciplinary connections, community partnerships and the enrichment of LIS education and professional practices. An honest look at one of the most exciting academic fields, regrettably neglected by LIS.

Details

New Library World, vol. 116 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2022

Tim Gorichanaz

The purpose of this paper is to further the scholarly discussion of information experience as an object of study, including how this research area fits into library and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to further the scholarly discussion of information experience as an object of study, including how this research area fits into library and information studies more broadly.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual discussion of certain issues raised in Yu and Liu's recent paper in this journal.

Findings

While Yu and Liu seem to suggest that only a priori information experience research belong in library and information science (LIS), this paper suggests that a priori and a posteriori research have a synergistic relationship and both have a home in LIS.

Originality/value

This paper clarifies how the two conceptualizations of information experience as an object of study relate to each other, as well as how these relate to information experience as a research approach, and how all this fits within the metadisciplinary field of LIS.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 79 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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