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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2018

Tor Wallin Andreassen, Line Lervik-Olsen, Hannah Snyder, Allard C.R. Van Riel, Jillian C. Sweeney and Yves Van Vaerenbergh

Building on the multi-divisional business model (M-model), the purpose of this paper is to develop a better understanding of triadic business models – T-models – and how…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on the multi-divisional business model (M-model), the purpose of this paper is to develop a better understanding of triadic business models – T-models – and how they create value for their three categories of stakeholders, i.e., the suppliers, the platform firm and the buyers. The research question that guides the present study is twofold: How is value created individually and collectively in triadic business models and what might challenge their sustainability?

Design/methodology/approach

Anchored in extant literature and a process of conceptual modeling with empirical examples from Uber, a new business model archetype was developed for two-sided markets mediated by a middleman.

Findings

The paper provides a theoretically and conceptually derived roadmap for sustainable business in a triadic business model, i.e., for the buyers, sellers and the platform firm. This model is coined the T-model. A number of propositions are derived that argue the relationship between key constructs. Finally, the future beyond the T-model is explored.

Research limitations/implications

The paper identifies, illustrates and discusses the ways in which value is created in sustainable T-models. First, value is created from a number of sources, not only from lower transaction costs. Second, it is proposed that it is not about a choice of either M-model or T-model but rather a continuum. Toward 2050, technology in general and Blockchain specifically may for some transactions or services, eliminate the need for middlemen. The main conclusion is that despite this development, there will, for most organizations, be elements of the M-model in all or most T-model businesses. In short: middlemen will have elements of the M-model embedded in the T-model when co creating value with buyers and sellers.

Originality/value

While two-sided T-models are not new to the business area, surprisingly no papers have systematically investigated, illustrated, and discussed how value is created among and between the three stakeholder categories of the T-model. With this insight, more sustainable T-models can be created.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Tor Wallin Andreassen, Per Kristensson, Line Lervik-Olsen, A Parasuraman, Janet R McColl-Kennedy, Bo Edvardsson and Maria Colurcio

– The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework for understanding service design and how service design relates to central concepts within service marketing.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework for understanding service design and how service design relates to central concepts within service marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

For companies, service design is growing in importance and has become a crucial capability to survive in the service-dominant economy. Service design increases the capacity to improve not only service experiences but also organizational design. On this premise, the authors propose a conceptual framework.

Findings

By relating service design to research efforts within service marketing, dual value creation can be enhanced. As such, the conceptual framework portrays service design as an enhancer of customer experience and organizational performance.

Originality/value

To the authors knowledge, service design has not been discussed in the service marketing literature. Thus, this is the first attempt to see service design in light of well-established service marketing models such as SERVQUAL and an updated version of the Service-profit-chain.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2009

Michael D. Johnson, Line Lervik Olsen and Tor Wallin Andreassen

The objective of this research is to provide insight into the management of service quality and emotions across customer relationships in the business‐to‐consumer market…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this research is to provide insight into the management of service quality and emotions across customer relationships in the business‐to‐consumer market and to identify which segmentation method, i.e. conceptual versus data‐driven, is more effective for this purpose.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐sectional customer satisfaction survey conducted in the hotel industry was used to test the predictions. The respondents were Norwegian customers (n=689) of an international hotel chain, interviewed by telephone through a professional marketing research bureau. Several statistical analyses were applied to analyze the data, i.e. Cluster, MANOVA and regression. The conceptual model was estimated using PLS.

Findings

It would appear that the weaker the relationship segment, the more quality‐based and disappointing is the customer experience. The stronger or closer the relationship segment, the more balanced (with respect to price and quality) and joyful is the experience. One segmentation method seems to be more efficient than the other in this context.

Research limitations/implications

The sample consists of Norwegian customers from the hotel industry represented by the business customer segment. There are more men than women in the samples.

Practical implications

The findings will allow service providers to develop more effective product‐service‐price offerings and manage the emotional responses of customers with whom they have very different relationships.

Originality/value

This is the first scientific study to examine just how the role of emotions varies across relationship segments while comparing the findings from two different segmentation techniques.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Line Lervik-Olsen, Tor Wallin Andreassen and Sandra Streukens

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the decision process behind whether customers complain, and to identify the effects of the situational factor credence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the decision process behind whether customers complain, and to identify the effects of the situational factor credence quality in this decision process.

Design/methodology/approach

A quasi-experimental design is used in which scenarios are applied in combination with a survey to test and to compare the model and its boundary conditions with existing consumer behavior models.

Findings

The mental-accounting process (theory of trying to complain (TTC)) seems to be a stronger predictor than mere attitude models (theory of planned behavior) when trying to explain intention to complain. Second, anticipated justice from complaint handling is a strong driver of intention to complain. Third, in both models, subjective norms are a strong predictor of intention to complain.

Practical implications

This study contributes to both theory and practice by extending existing theory and offering the TTC, and by providing practical insight for service managers.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the current study is the first to compare systematically two complaint approaches explaining complaint intention: the attitude model and the mental-accounting model.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Line Lervik Olsen, Lars Witell and Anders Gustafsson

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on customer orientation by developing and empirically testing a model that attempts to explain the elements…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on customer orientation by developing and empirically testing a model that attempts to explain the elements that constitute customer orientation and that, in turn, influence customer satisfaction. In particular, this study focuses on how service firms design, collect, analyse and use customer-satisfaction data to improve service performance. This study has the following three research objectives: to understand the process and, as a consequence, the phases of customer orientation; to investigate the relationships between the different phases of customer orientation and customer satisfaction; and to examine activities in the different phases of customer orientation that result in higher customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

This study, combining quantitative and qualitative research, is based on a cross-sectional survey of 320 service firms and a multiple case study of 20 organisational units at a large service firm in the European telecom industry.

Findings

The results show that customer orientation consists of a process that includes three phases: strategy, measurement and analysis and implementation. Contrary to previous research, implementation has the strongest influence on customer satisfaction. In turn, customer satisfaction influences financial results. In-depth interviews with managers provided insights into the specific activities that are key for turning customer-satisfaction measurements into action.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the literature on customer orientation by developing and empirically testing a model that attempts to explain what constitutes customer orientation and, in turn, influences customer satisfaction and financial results. Given the large amount of research on customer satisfaction, studies on how service firms collect and use customer-satisfaction data in practice are scarce.

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Lars Witell, Laurel Anderson, Roderick J. Brodie, Maria Colurcio, Bo Edvardsson, Per Kristensson, Line Lervik-Olsen, Roberta Sebastiani and Tor Wallin Andreassen

– The purpose of this study is to explore three paradoxes of service innovation and provide a way forward for fresh thinking on the topic.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore three paradoxes of service innovation and provide a way forward for fresh thinking on the topic.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a conceptual model of service innovation research, the authors challenge the “pro-change” bias and explore what can be learnt from the duality of service innovation.

Findings

This paper suggests that research moves beyond a firm perspective to study service innovation on multiple levels of abstraction. A conceptual model based on two dimensions, level (individual, organization and society) and outcome (success, failure), is used to pinpoint and explore three dualities of service innovation: adopt–reject, change–static and good–bad.

Originality/value

By challenging the traditional perspective on service innovation, the authors present new avenues for fresh thinking in research on service innovation. In this paper, the authors encourage researchers and managers to learn from failures and to acknowledge the negative effects of service innovation.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 29 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Tor W. Andreassen, Line Lervik-Olsen and Giulia Calabretta

Improving the commercial success rate of innovations requires alternative approaches based on social science methodologies for identifying subtle, emerging changes in…

Abstract

Purpose

Improving the commercial success rate of innovations requires alternative approaches based on social science methodologies for identifying subtle, emerging changes in consumer needs and behaviors. The purpose of this paper is to address this call by proposing trend spotting to guide innovation researchers and service managers towards innovations that are more in accordance with emerging consumer needs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop, describe, and employ a methodology for trend spotting to derive eight consumer trends that will have a strong influence on their choices. To provide further insights into these trends, the authors label and describe three customer segments as a function of life-cycle. The goal is to provide a framework for identifying innovations that are of higher value consumers.

Findings

The authors identified eight consumer trends, i.e. Always on the go, Always logged-in, Quality information faster, Nowism, Look at me now, Privacy, Sustainable living, and return on time (RoT), present across the three life-stage segments, i.e. Young free and single, Chaos in my life, and Got my life back.

Practical implications

For illustration purpose, the authors elaborate on the trend RoT and employ their findings and framework to illustrate how the airline industry may derive ideas for valuable innovations.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first time trend spotting has been employed in the field of service marketing and service innovations.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

Abstract

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Abstract

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

– This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

The authors identified eight consumer trends, i.e. always on the go, always logged-in, quality information faster, nowism, look at me now, privacy, sustainable living and return on time (RoT), present across the three life-stage segments, i.e. young free and simple, chaos in my life and got my life back.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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