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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Lindsay Ryan

The purpose of this paper is to explore why corporations are forming corporate education partnerships with universities and the role of corporate education programmes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore why corporations are forming corporate education partnerships with universities and the role of corporate education programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the findings from quantitative research involving 79 senior managers from North America, the UK, and Australia responsible for the management of their university‐corporate education partnerships.

Findings

The research finds that the primary reason for establishing university‐corporate education partnerships is to provide a recognised university award programme to complement an organisation's in‐house education programmes. Also, by aligning with a university an organisation is able to add strength and credibility to its in‐house corporate education programmes.

Originality/value

The research provides an insight into the growing role of university‐corporate education partnerships and helps to quantify some emerging aspects of these partnerships.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 47 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Lindsay Ryan and Ross Morriss

This article outlines the experience and approach of an Australian university in developing and managing education program partnerships within industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This article outlines the experience and approach of an Australian university in developing and managing education program partnerships within industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Describes how the university has established a specialist Strategic Partnerships unit for managing the customisation and delivery of postgraduate award programs and executive education to industry. Discusses some of the key issues that have contributed to the management of industry partnerships.

Findings

Some of the key issues that have contributed to the management of industry partnerships include project management of industry programs and flexibility in developing and delivering education programs to industry from a university perspective.

Originality/value

Provides an illustration of the growth of university and corporate education partnerships in an Australian context.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2007

Lindsay Ryan

Collaborations between universities and industry to develop and deliver customised corporate education programs are increasing. The purpose of this paper is to assist…

Abstract

Purpose

Collaborations between universities and industry to develop and deliver customised corporate education programs are increasing. The purpose of this paper is to assist managers to make an informed decision on the structure and approach to their corporate education programs by exploring a range of qualitative factors in university‐corporate education partnerships.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the findings of a series of qualitative interviews with six senior corporate managers from diverse industries and three university managers on the factors they regard as important in university‐corporate education partnerships.

Findings

The research highlights the needs for both universities and corporations to take the time to learn and understand the requirements and expectations of each other and, as in any good relationship, provide flexibility to accommodate these requirements and expectations. The research findings are intended to provide a starting‐point for understanding the nature of the working relationship between universities and corporations in order to successfully develop and deliver corporate education programs in industry.

Originality/value

Most papers on university‐corporate education partnerships are based on opinion or case studies. The originality of this research provides an objective insight into factors that influence the success of university‐corporate education partnerships.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Charles R. Gowen, Kathleen L. McFadden and Sriranjita Settaluri

Rapidly rising healthcare costs, partially due to preventable medical errors, have led hospitals to redouble their process improvement (PI) efforts. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Rapidly rising healthcare costs, partially due to preventable medical errors, have led hospitals to redouble their process improvement (PI) efforts. The purpose of this paper is to examine how PI initiatives mediate the effect of medical error sources to enhance three hospital outcomes (patient safety, operational effectiveness, and competitiveness).

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from Dynamic Capabilities Theory, the authors develop a framework to explore three PI initiatives: Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI), Six Sigma Initiatives (SSI), and Lean Management Initiatives (LMI). Hierarchical regression analysis is employed to test the proposed model, using data from a nationwide survey of 210 US hospitals.

Findings

For enhancing patient safety outcomes, it was found that CQI and LMI were significant in mediating hospital error sources; however, SSI was not significant after accounting for the other two PI types. For improving organizational effectiveness, CQI and SSI were significant; whereas LMI was not significant over and above the other two PI types. Finally, only SSI was significant for superior sustainable competitive advantage.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides insight into which PI initiatives were most effective for various hospital outcomes. The findings can benefit healthcare practitioners as they select among different PI programs for enhancing healthcare results. Limitations of the study include the use of perceptual measures, relatively small sample size, and potential alternate relationships relevant to the outcome variables.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore the mediating effects of three PI programs for the impact of medical errors on each of three hospital outcomes.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2012

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

The myth that some American colleges of higher education offer a degree in making hamburgers results probably from a failure to understand the difference between a “real” university and the corporate variety.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Original/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2019

John H. Bickford, Megan Lindsay and Ryan C. Hendrickson

History-based trade books are an essential classroom option for social studies and English teachers. Professional organizations in history, social studies, English…

Abstract

Purpose

History-based trade books are an essential classroom option for social studies and English teachers. Professional organizations in history, social studies, English, reading and literature promote these engaging, age-appropriate secondary sources. Research suggests that misrepresentations appear often within history-based curricula, yet the majority of empirical studies have been completed on textbooks. The purpose of this paper is to examine the historical representation of Thomas Jefferson within trade books.

Design/methodology/approach

The data sample included trade books targeting various ages to make comparisons within and between grade ranges; the authors selected books published in distinctly different years to examine how Jefferson’s historical representation changed over time. The mixed methods content analysis used both open coding and axial coding.

Findings

Findings included sanitized versions of slavery at Monticello and omissions of his relationship with Sally Hemings. Date of publication, particularly those published after 1999 as new scientific evidence emerged linking Hemings and Jefferson, and intended audience shaped patterns of representation about Jefferson’s privileged social position, authorship of the Declaration of Independence, political philosophy and involvement in the American Revolution, to mention a few. Heroification, a common historical misrepresentation, did not appear.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations included: uneven portions of the data pool as children’s and young adult trade books were not common in early and mid-twentieth century; organization of books by grade range is problematic due to inexact nature of ranking narratives’ complexity; and definitive conclusions cannot emerge from a single study. Future research should consider how trade books represent other historical figures, particularly slave-owning American presidents.

Practical implications

Practical suggestions, such as how to address misrepresentations using primary sources, are offered.

Originality/value

Thomas Jefferson, undoubtedly an impactful American, is frequently included in elementary, middle level and high school curriculum. The authors examined Jefferson’s historical representation within trade books.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Book part
Publication date: 25 June 2010

Robert E. Prasch

In the US minimum wages were initially enacted by individual states, beginning with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in 1912. These laws were modeled on legislation…

Abstract

In the US minimum wages were initially enacted by individual states, beginning with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in 1912. These laws were modeled on legislation enacted over the previous two decades in Australia, New Zealand, and England (Fisher, 1926, chap. 8; Hammond, 1915, 1913; Hobson, 1915; Hart, 1994, chaps. 2 & 3; Morris, 1986). From 1912 to 1923, the legislatures of 16 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia passed minimum wage legislation, although not all of them were operational by the end of this period (Brandeis, 1935, p. 501; Clark, 1921; Millis & Montgomery, 1938, chap. 6; Morris, 1930, chap. 1).

Details

A Research Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-060-6

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Luca Rollè, Fabrizio Santoniccolo, Domenico D'Amico and Tommaso Trombetta

Introduction: Media representation of intimate partner violence (IPV) can influence public opinion and understanding of the phenomena and guide health policies. The…

Abstract

Introduction: Media representation of intimate partner violence (IPV) can influence public opinion and understanding of the phenomena and guide health policies. The current review has the aim to explore and discuss international, scientific literature focused on the portrayal of IPV in written forms of news media.

Method: Searching through EBSCO and PubMed, 2,435 studies were found and 41 were included in the current review.

Results: Bias in the portrayal of IPV was found within the studies included. While IPV-related news was mainly focused on male-perpetrated violence within heterosexual couples, little attention was paid to same-sex intimate partner violence (SSIPV). Newsworthy stories dominate IPV reporting within news media and a sensationalistic style was often employed. Furthermore, contextual information was often limited and the adoption of a thematic frame was rare, while news media were found to commonly employ an episodic frame. Official sources and family, friends and neighbours were the most quoted sources in news articles, while IPV experts were rarely drawn on for information. Regarding media representation of perpetrators, mainly regarding male abusers, news articles reported several reasons behind the violence with the consequence to justify and exonerate them from their responsibilities. Female perpetrators were found to be depicted, in some cases, as ‘mad’ or ‘bad’ people. Finally, victim-blaming content emerged within many of the articles included.

Conclusion: Bias in the media representation of IPV emerged in the current review, which needs to be addressed to positively influence public opinion and to promote an adequate understanding of the phenomena.

Details

Gendered Domestic Violence and Abuse in Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-781-7

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Luz Nario Gravador and Mendiola Teng-Calleja

The purpose of this paper is to address gaps in the work-life balance (WLB) literature by identifying WLB crafting behaviors employed by individuals, empirically testing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address gaps in the work-life balance (WLB) literature by identifying WLB crafting behaviors employed by individuals, empirically testing which of these behaviors significantly affect WLB, and examining the relationship between the identified WLB crafting behaviors, WLB, and subjective well-being (SWB).

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilized a quantitative approach. In total, 314 employees participated in the online survey. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized relationships among the variables.

Findings

Results show that protecting private time and working efficiently significantly relate with WLB and that WLB mediates the relationships between these two WLB crafting behaviors and SWB. Findings also suggest a significant direct relationship between behaviors that foster family relationships and SWB.

Research limitations/implications

The study is correlational in nature. Future studies may make use of experimental designs or conduct a longitudinal study. Other variables can be examined in future research such as life circumstances (i.e. life cycle stage change, objective health status) or other constructs within the self-concordance model (i.e. goal concordance, need satisfaction fulfillment).

Practical implications

The results suggest the importance of organization support in employees’ mastery of significant crafting behaviors through offering socialization, productivity, and time management employee programs.

Originality/value

The present research, unlike previous studies on employees’ proactive behaviors to attain WLB, empirically tested the identified behaviors and was able to identify the WLB crafting behaviors with significant relationships with WLB and SWB.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Kate Westberg, Constantino Stavros, Aaron C.T. Smith, Joshua Newton, Sophie Lindsay, Sarah Kelly, Shenae Beus and Daryl Adair

This paper aims to extend the literature on wicked problems in consumer research by exploring athlete and consumer vulnerability in sport and the potential role that…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to extend the literature on wicked problems in consumer research by exploring athlete and consumer vulnerability in sport and the potential role that social marketing can play in addressing this problem.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conceptualises the wicked problem of athlete and consumer vulnerability in sport, proposing a multi-theoretical approach to social marketing, incorporating insights from stakeholder theory, systems theory and cocreation to tackle this complex problem.

Findings

Sport provides a rich context for exploring a social marketing approach to a wicked problem, as it operates in a complex ecosystem with multiple stakeholders with differing, and sometimes conflicting, objectives. It is proposed that consumers, particularly those that are highly identified fans, are key stakeholders that have both facilitated the problematic nature of the sport system and been rendered vulnerable as a result. Further, a form of consumer vulnerability also extends to athletes as the evolution of the sport system has led them to engage in harmful consumption behaviours. Social marketing, with its strategic and multi-faceted focus on facilitating social good, is an apt approach to tackle behavioural change at multiple levels within the sport system.

Practical implications

Sport managers, public health practitioners and policymakers are given insight into the key drivers of a growing wicked problem as well as the potential for social marketing to mitigate harm.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to identify and explicate a wicked problem in sport. More generally it extends insight into wicked problems in consumer research by examining a case whereby the consumer is both complicit in, and made vulnerable by, the creation of a wicked problem. This paper is the first to explore the use of social marketing in managing wicked problems in sport.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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