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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Elaine Tweneboah Lawson, Fidelia Ohemeng, Jesse Ayivor, Melissa Leach, Linda Waldman and Yaa Ntiamoa-Baidu

Bats provide many ecosystem services and have intrinsic value. They also act as host reservoirs for some viruses. Several studies have linked zoonotic diseases to bats…

Abstract

Purpose

Bats provide many ecosystem services and have intrinsic value. They also act as host reservoirs for some viruses. Several studies have linked zoonotic diseases to bats, raising questions about the risks bats pose, especially to people living close to bat roosts. Through a series of case studies undertaken in three communities, the purpose of this paper is to explore the various ways in which framings and perceptions of bats can influence a potential spillover of bat-borne viruses to humans in Ghana. It assesses the social, cultural and economic factors that drive human-bat interactions and posits that understanding the socio-economic contexts in which human-bat interactions occur is key to the success of future communication strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data collection methods included participatory landscape mappings, transect walks, focus group discussions and questionnaire surveys.

Findings

Perceptions of bats vary and are influenced by personal beliefs, the perceived economic benefits derived from bats and the location of bat roosts. Activities that put people at risk include bat hunting, butchering and consumption of poorly prepared bat meat. Those who live and work close to bat roosts, and bat hunters, for example, are more at risk of bat-borne zoonotic disease spillover. Disease risk perceptions were generally low, with high levels of uncertainty, indicating the need for clearer information about personal protective practices.

Originality/value

The results of the study may well inform future risk communication strategies as well as help in developing effective responses to zoonotic disease risk, disease outbreaks and the conservation of bats in communities.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Allan Metz

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the…

Abstract

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the Clinton presidency, systematically have sought to undermine this president with the goal of bringing down his presidency and running him out of office; and that they have sought non‐electoral means to remove him from office, including Travelgate, the death of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster, the Filegate controversy, and the Monica Lewinsky matter. This bibliography identifies these and other means by presenting citations about these individuals and organizations that have opposed Clinton. The bibliography is divided into five sections: General; “The conspiracy stream of conspiracy commerce”, a White House‐produced “report” presenting its view of a right‐wing conspiracy against the Clinton presidency; Funding; Conservative organizations; and Publishing/media. Many of the annotations note the links among these key players.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Hannelore B. Rader

The following is an annotated list of materials dealing with information literacy including instruction in the use of information resources, research, and computer skills…

Abstract

The following is an annotated list of materials dealing with information literacy including instruction in the use of information resources, research, and computer skills related to retrieving, using, and evaluating information. This review, the twentieth to be published in Reference Services Review, includes items in English published in 1993. A few are not annotated because the compiler could not obtain copies of them for this review.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Abstract

Details

Gender and Contemporary Horror in Film
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-898-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Leanne Atwater, Robert Penn and Linda Rucker

Questionnaires assessing subjects′ perceptions ofcharismatic and non‐charismatic leaders wereadministered to civilians and military officers. Resultsprovided support for…

Abstract

Questionnaires assessing subjects′ perceptions of charismatic and non‐charismatic leaders were administered to civilians and military officers. Results provided support for House′s 1976 model in that many traits distinguished charismatic from non‐charismatic individuals. Additionally, charismatic military leaders differed from charismatic civilian leaders on a number of personal characteristics. Implications for selecting and training leaders in organisations are discussed.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part
Publication date: 9 October 2020

Ellie Chapple, Kathleen Walsh and Yun Shen

Abstract

Details

Corporate Fraud Exposed
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-418-8

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Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2015

Abstract

Details

University Partnerships for Community and School System Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-132-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Robert A. Orwig and Linda L. Brennan

Quality management (QM) has been the purview of operations management for repetitive processes, where project management (PM) is applied to temporary endeavors to create…

Abstract

Quality management (QM) has been the purview of operations management for repetitive processes, where project management (PM) is applied to temporary endeavors to create unique products or services. Any convergence of thought between PM and QM has been focused on using PM to implement a total quality management culture or on assuring the quality of the project outcomes and deliverables. However, for project‐based organizations, where the project is the basic form of organization for its operation, PM is of itself an ongoing, repetitive operation to which at least some of the QM practices could apply. By considering both disciplines in terms of the fundamental principles of customer focus, teamwork and continuous improvement, it can be shown that by instituting a formal project management methodology and instituting basic PM techniques, project‐based organizations are fulfilling the principles of quality.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 17 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Linda A. Hayes, Cam Caldwell, Bryan Licona and Thomas E. Meyer

The purpose of this paper is to further research in the leader-follower relationship by focussing on followership. Given the need to increase organizational collaboration…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to further research in the leader-follower relationship by focussing on followership. Given the need to increase organizational collaboration and cooperation, this research identifies the nature of follower buy-in behaviors and characteristics and develops a continuum of increasing follower compliance to stewardship with the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

This research integrates the insights of highly regarded researchers into a continuum of follower compliance to stewardship and proposes 12 propositions of leaders and followers that address the importance of creating an environment for improved collaboration and cooperation which ultimately leads to increased organizational competitiveness and profitability.

Findings

A continuum of increasing follower buy-in is proposed with the first four zones drawn from past literature (indifference, acceptance, trust, and commitment) and a fifth zone, follower stewardship, being introduced in the paper. The authors argue that understanding and fostering follower behaviors along the continuum improves organizational effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

This research offers a framework of follower behaviors and characteristics and proposes 12 hypotheses of leaders and followers to improve competitiveness and profitability that can be tested in future research.

Practical implications

This paper provides valuable insights to scholars and practitioners by creating a framework of follower buy-in behaviors and characteristics that will allow leaders to increase the effectiveness of organizational culture, practices, and procedures. The research proposes 12 hypotheses of leaders and followers that can be tested for improving organizational competitiveness and profitability.

Social implications

The paper identifies barriers to creating followership including under-investing in human capital, treating followers as means rather than as ends, thinking short-term, breaking commitments, and so on.

Originality/value

The research develops a solid theoretical background for categorizing and measuring follower buy-in to organizations and introduces follower stewardship to management research.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Linda Duxbury and Michael Halinski

The aging of the workforce and the impending labour force shortage at the skilled end of the labour market increases the need for organizations to understand how to…

Abstract

Purpose

The aging of the workforce and the impending labour force shortage at the skilled end of the labour market increases the need for organizations to understand how to “re-engage” older workers with low commitment and reduce the turnover intentions of committed older knowledge workers. The current study addresses this issue by using employee commitment and intent to turnover scores to classify older knowledge workers into four groups: Disengaged-Exiters, Engaged-High-Performers, Retired-on-the-Job and Exiting-Performers. The purpose of this paper is to identify a set of work factors and practices that predispose older knowledge workers to fall into one or another of the four groups and offer suggestions on how organizations can increase commitment and decrease intent to turnover of their older workers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used survey data (n=5,588) from a Canadian national study on work, family and caregiving to test the framework. Data analysis was performed using a MANCOVA with one independent variable (Boomer group), four dependent variables (job satisfaction, non-supportive culture, supportive manager, work-role overload) and one covariate (gender).

Findings

The results support the framework. The findings suggest organizations that wish to retain committed Baby Boomers need to address issues with respect to workload. Alternatively, organizations who wish to increase the commitment levels of Boomers who have “Retired-on-the-Job” need to focus on supportive management, organizational culture and career development.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on organizational commitment and intent to turnover by re-conceptualizing the relationship between these traditional concepts.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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