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Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2008

Solveig-Alma Halaas Lyster and Siri Wormnæs

One of the challenges in educating teachers about inclusion, be it pre-service or in-service, is influencing the student's preconceptions and perspectives so that their…

Abstract

One of the challenges in educating teachers about inclusion, be it pre-service or in-service, is influencing the student's preconceptions and perspectives so that their newly acquired knowledge will guide their actions in the classroom. A DVD entitled Teachers for All, consisting of 40–50 video sequences recorded in Uganda and Kenya, each followed by discussion questions, has been produced to help meet this challenge. Lecturers at the Department of Special Needs Education at The University of Oslo, in collaboration with our partners in Uganda and Kenya, have been involved in the development of the content of the video recordings. The material has been tested at teacher education institutions in Uganda, Kenya and Norway. The topic of the material is the inclusive classroom, focusing on learners with special needs and on the teaching of reading. Video recordings of a total of 59 students’ reflections and discussions and also information from their reflective notes, were transcribed and analysed. The project results show that the DVD material is promising; it is user-friendly providing students with new outlooks about teaching and learning. Results of the study indicate that video sequences have the potential to be used in training students to observe significant details for implementing inclusive education.

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Personnel Preparation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-59749-274-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Linda Marks, Andrew Gray and Sarah Pearce

The standard of health care in prisons should be equivalent to that provided in the community. Prison populations are multiply disadvantaged and primary health care…

Abstract

The standard of health care in prisons should be equivalent to that provided in the community. Prison populations are multiply disadvantaged and primary health care practitioners in prisons routinely face organisational and ethical challenges which are rare in community‐based general practice. This raises the question of whether doctors working in prisons consider they would benefit from additional clinical skills or training, the range of prison‐specific competencies they consider important and what they would like to see included in induction programmes. Through a series of semi‐structured, faceto‐face interviews with doctors and health care managers working in prisons, this study sought to identify views on the training needs for doctors working in prisons. Practitioners demonstrated that induction processes were varied and fragmented and that delivering primary care in prisons raised additional clinical and organisational challenges. Relationships with prisoner patients were generally good. Few ethical issues were raised by this small sample, with the exception of confidentiality. However, aspirations towards equivalence were tempered by tensions between custodial needs and clinical requirements, and more research should be directed to the ways practitioners negotiate this interface. Induction programmes should ensure that all practitioners receive practical and ethical guidance to help them address these tensions.

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International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1975

Tom Schultheiss and Linda Mark

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to…

Abstract

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to supplement the RSR review column, “Recent Reference Books,” by Frances Neel Cheney. “Reference Books in Print” includes all additional books received prior to the inclusion deadline established for this issue. Appearance in this column does not preclude a later review in RSR. Publishers are urged to send a copy of all new reference books directly to RSR as soon as published, for immediate listing in “Reference Books in Print.” Reference books with imprints older than two years will not be included (with the exception of current reprints or older books newly acquired for distribution by another publisher). The column shall also occasionally include library science or other library related publications of other than a reference character.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1975

Tom Schultheiss and Linda Mark

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to…

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Abstract

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to supplement the RSR review column, “Recent Reference Books,” by Frances Neel Cheney. “Reference Books in Print” includes all additional books received prior to the inclusion deadline established for this issue. Appearance in this column does not preclude a later review in RSR. Publishers are urged to send a copy of all new reference books directly to RSR as soon as published, for immediate listing in “Reference Books in Print.” Reference books with imprints older than two years will not be included (with the exception of current reprints or older books newly acquired for distribution by another publisher). The column shall also occasionally include library science or other library related publications of other than a reference character.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Linda Rouleau, Mark de Rond and Geneviève Musca

– The purpose of this paper is to outline the context and the content of the six papers that follow in this special issue on “New Forms of Organizational Ethnography”.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the context and the content of the six papers that follow in this special issue on “New Forms of Organizational Ethnography”.

Design/methodology/approach

This editorial explains the burgeoning interest in organizational ethnography over the last decade in terms of several favourable conditions that have supported this resurgence. It also offers a general view of the nature and diversity of new forms of organizational ethnography in studies of management and organization.

Findings

New forms of organizational ethnography have emerged in response to rapidly changing organizational environments and technological advances as well as the paradigmatic transformation of ethnography and ascendency of discursive and practice-based studies.

Originality/value

The editorial highlights an “ethnographic turn” in management and organization studies that is characterized by a renewal of the discipline through the proliferation of new forms of organizational ethnography. A focus on new organizational phenomena, methodological innovation and novel ways of organizing fieldwork constitute the three main pillars of new forms of organizational ethnography. It encourages researchers to develop forums and platforms designed to exploit these novel forms of organizational ethnography.

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Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Andrew Gray, Sarah Pearce and Linda Marks

In the context of the transfer of the responsibility for prison health from the Prison Service to the National Health Service, a survey of doctors working in prisons…

Abstract

In the context of the transfer of the responsibility for prison health from the Prison Service to the National Health Service, a survey of doctors working in prisons reveals doctors’ own high priorities for training in the distinct patient contexts found in prison as well as in certain clinical conditions. The analysis identifies exclusive competences required only for doctors working in prisons and special interest competences that although applicable to practice in the community are particular strengths of doctors working in prisons because of the prevalence of conditions they are required to address.

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International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Linda Marks

The purpose of this study is to explore gaps between policy and practice in relation to the involvement of voluntary and community sector (VCS) members in local strategic…

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709

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore gaps between policy and practice in relation to the involvement of voluntary and community sector (VCS) members in local strategic partnerships (LSPs), using the example of inequalities in health.

Design/methodology/approach

Documentary analysis; semi‐structured interviews with VCS representatives from a sample of LSPs in one region of England; semi‐structured interviews with key researchers and national stakeholders.

Findings

National policy imperatives to expand the role of the VCS in decision‐making and to make LSPs an important avenue for addressing inequalities in health are not always translated into practice. VCS members are at the sharp end of tensions in LSPs between thematic and neighbourhood approaches, local views and strategic priorities and between democratic and participatory approaches to decision‐making. Effective engagement in addressing inequalities in health requires a strategic approach across the LSP which is reflected in the priorities of each of the constituent partnerships.

Research limitations/implications

This is a snapshot of LSPs at one point in time and local interviews are restricted to one region of England.

Practical implications

The article illustrates good practice and barriers to VCS involvement in addressing inequalities in health through LSPs. This is relevant to a range of public health partnerships.

Originality/value

The views of VCS members on addressing inequalities in health through LSPs have not previously been researched, despite their key role. Lessons are relevant for multi‐agency strategic partnerships with a public health focus in England and internationally.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Linda C. Tallberg, Peter J. Jordan and Maree Boyle

The purpose of this paper is to discuss emotions within a highly emotive organizational setting through the use of crystallization. The authors contend that the…

Abstract

Purpose –

The purpose of this paper is to discuss emotions within a highly emotive organizational setting through the use of crystallization. The authors contend that the expression of a researcher's positionality as a presence within their research is crucial in contexts where conventional research approaches are unable to capture the depth of the phenomenon under study. The paper argues that the presentation of research findings from highly emotional organizational context will benefit from a challenge to traditional ways of representing and communicating the researcher's experience. As an example of this, in this paper the authors examine the emotions involved in experiencing animal euthanasia in a work context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws ethnographic methods of fieldwork in an Australian animal shelter. The paper uses autoethnography and interview data.

Findings

Euthanasia is one of the most tolling experiences for animal shelter workers. This paper reveals that through a creative representation this experience may come induce understanding of the emotive context. Furthermore, the employees adapt one or more story-lines to deal with the conflict of euthanasia.

Originality/value

The strength of this paper is that it uses a novel approach to present findings in the form of crystallization. It also furthers insight on how organizational members explain their involvement in emotive work-tasks.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Barratt Wilkins, Mark W. Flynn, Linda T. Fuchs, Marvin W. Mounce, Charles E. Parker, Peggy D. Rudd and Lawrence Webster

Networking in Florida reflects the socioeconomic and geographic diversity of the state. Organizational, telecommunications, and governance structures are diverse and…

Abstract

Networking in Florida reflects the socioeconomic and geographic diversity of the state. Organizational, telecommunications, and governance structures are diverse and complex. Network development has been a grassroots effort involving all types of libraries, with coordination provided at the state level. The Florida Division of Library and Information Services, Department of State (also known as the State Library) has assumed a leadership and coordinating role for many years, facilitating the growth of networking through advice, counsel, and funding. In 1985–86, the State Library commissioned an extensive study of libraries of all types with an eye toward coordinated networking and resource sharing. The resulting Florida Long‐Range Plan for Interlibrary Cooperation served as a blueprint for network development. That plan was revised annually through 1990–91 and was completely reworked in 1994 as the Florida Plan for Interlibrary Cooperation, Resource Sharing, and Network Development, with extensive input from a wide range of stakeholders in the library and information community.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 14 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1975

Tom Schultheiss and Linda Mark

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to…

Abstract

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to supplement the RSR review column, “Recent Reference Books,” by Frances Neel Cheney. “Reference Books in Print” includes all additional books received prior to the inclusion deadline established for this issue. Appearance in this column does not preclude a later review in RSR. Publishers are urged to send a copy of all new reference books directly to RSR as soon as published, for immediate listing in “Reference Books in Print.” Reference books with imprints older than two years will not be included (with the exception of current reprints or older books newly acquired for distribution by another publisher). The column shall also occasionally include library science or other library related publications of other than a reference character.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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