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Article

Linda MacGregor

The article examines the thought and practice relating to mentoring in Australia. Beginning with facilitated mentoring, two case studies are provided. A second view…

Abstract

The article examines the thought and practice relating to mentoring in Australia. Beginning with facilitated mentoring, two case studies are provided. A second view, guided learning is also explored. The article concludes with a consideration of future trends.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 5 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article

PAUL THOMPSON

The psychological literature on subjective probability estimation is reviewed to determine the feasibility of designing probabilistic information retrieval systems using…

Abstract

The psychological literature on subjective probability estimation is reviewed to determine the feasibility of designing probabilistic information retrieval systems using such estimates. Their use has been considered by some writers, but psychological issues have not been addressed. Research pertinent to probabilistic information retrieval is examined and implications for probabilistic information retrieval are drawn. It is shown that accurate human probability estimation is possible, both in the laboratory and in real world tasks, e.g., in meteorological forecasting; but that it is also a task subject to systematic bias, or inaccuracy. Proposed techniques for debiasing are considered. The highly task‐dependent nature of such estimates is also discussed; two implications are that results from laboratory studies may have limited relevance to real world tasks and that empirical studies specific to the context of information retrieval need to be made. Human probability estimation appears to be a difficult task, but one which can be done well with proper training and use of debiasing techniques. It is premature to say how useful such estimates would be in probabilistic information retrieval, but their use should not yet be ruled out.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Book part

Yunseon Choi

This chapter aims to discuss the issues associated with social indexing as a solution to the challenges of current information organization systems by investigating the…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter aims to discuss the issues associated with social indexing as a solution to the challenges of current information organization systems by investigating the quality and efficacy of social indexing.

Design/methodology/approach

The chapter focuses on the study which compared indexing similarity between two professional groups and also compared social tagging and professional indexing. The study employed the method of the modified vector-based Indexing Consistency Density (ICD) with three different similarity measures: cosine similarity, dot product similarity, and Euclidean distance metric.

Findings

The investigation of social indexing in comparison of professional indexing demonstrates that social tags are more accurate descriptions of resources and reflection of more current terminology than controlled vocabulary. Through the characteristics of social tagging discussed in this chapter, we have a clearer understanding of the extent to which social indexing can be used to replace and improve upon professional indexing.

Research limitations/implications

As investment in professionally developed web directories diminishes, it becomes even more critical to understand the characteristics of social tagging and to obtain benefit from it. In future research, the examination of subjective tags needs to be conducted. A survey or user study on tagging behavior also would help to extend understanding of social indexing practices.

Details

New Directions in Information Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-559-3

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Article

Linda Cusick, Kathryn McGarry, Georgina Perry and Sian Kilcommons

In this paper, academics and managers of specialist services reflect on the shifting policy and funding landscapes that shape service provision for drug‐using sex workers…

Abstract

In this paper, academics and managers of specialist services reflect on the shifting policy and funding landscapes that shape service provision for drug‐using sex workers in England and Ireland. The paper outlines the harm reduction and holistic principles that underpinned much original service provision concerned with public health in the face of an HIV epidemic and the limitations of services that equate drug use minimisation with sex work minimisation. It concludes that an ‘exiting’ and victim discourse dovetails with the well‐funded crime and disorder agenda, and that lobbyists on these issues are proving to be natural allies against harm reduction.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

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Book part

Despina Chronaki and Liza Tsaliki

Testing boundaries in the context of encountering horror representations have long been of interest to cultural studies scholars. There have been rich cultural accounts of…

Abstract

Testing boundaries in the context of encountering horror representations have long been of interest to cultural studies scholars. There have been rich cultural accounts of how audiences negotiate with what is frightening or disgusting on screen (Hill, 2005) not just in general but also in what concerns specific social groups as well (e.g. children, Buckingham, 2000). Horror, disgust and the emotion of fear have not been examined in the Greek context so far and it is our aim to attempt a first investigation of how certain groups of viewers engage with the horror genre. We draw upon the argument that fear from encountering horror is a socially based emotion through which people do not just test their own boundaries but also their boundaries within a group of peers (Hill, 2005). Given that women are stereotypically thought to be more afraid than men, we are particularly interested to see how women aged between 20 and 35 in Greece engage with fear or disgust in the mainstreamed context of the horror offered by American Horror Story. We are particularly interested in the ways they perceive horror but also deadly women or female villains. Our interest in this particular series lies not only in its popularity across the world but also because of its nature as a representative series of the horror genre and because all different narratives it offers are mostly based on female characters primarily as villains. Also, as a text available across different cultures, it could probably allow us to engage with cross-cultural research in the future. Therefore we wish to conduct an online survey with women aged 20–35 in Greece, followed by focus groups with women of the same age group in an attempt to provide both a mapping and a further investigation of the topic.

Details

Gender and Contemporary Horror in Television
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-103-2

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Corporate Fraud Exposed
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-418-8

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Book part

Laura Gover and Linda Duxbury

This chapter seeks to increase our understanding of health care employees' perceptions of effective and ineffective leadership behavior within their organization.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter seeks to increase our understanding of health care employees' perceptions of effective and ineffective leadership behavior within their organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were conducted with 59 employees working in a diversity of positions within the case study hospital. Interviewees were asked to cite behaviors of both an effective and an ineffective leader in their organization. They were also asked to clarify whether their example described the behavior of a formal or informal leader. Grounded theory data analysis techniques were used and findings were interpreting using existing leadership behavior theories.

Findings

(1) There was a consistent link between effective leadership and relationally oriented behaviors. (2) Employees identified both formal and informal leadership within their hospital. (3) There were both similarities and differences with respect to the types of behaviors attributed to informal versus formal leaders. (4) Informants cited a number of leadership behaviors not yet accounted for in the leadership behavior literature (e.g., ‘hands on’, ‘professional’, ‘knows organization’). (5) Ineffective leadership behavior is not simply the opposite of effective leadership.

Research implications

Findings support the following ideas: (1) there may be a relationship between the type of job held by employees in health care organizations and their perceptions of leader behavior, and (2) leadership behavior theories are not yet comprehensive enough to account for the varieties of leadership behavior in a health care organization. This study is limited by the fact that it focused on only those leadership theories that considered leader behavior.

Practical implications

There are two practical implications for health care organizations: (1) leaders should recognize that the type of behavior an employee prefers from a leader may vary by follower job group (e.g., nurses may prefer relational behavior more than managerial staff do), and (2) organizations could improve leader development programs and evaluation tools by identifying ineffective leadership behaviors that they want to see reduced within their workplace.

Social implications

Health care organizations could use these findings to identify informal leaders in their organization and invest in training and development for them in hopes that these individuals will have positive direct or indirect impacts on patient, staff, and organizational outcomes through their informal leadership role.

Value/originality

This study contributes to research and practice on leadership behavior in health care organizations by explicitly considering effective and ineffective leader behavior preferences across multiple job types in a health care organization. Such a study has not previously been done despite the multi-professional nature of health care organizations.

Details

Leading in Health Care Organizations: Improving Safety, Satisfaction and Financial Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-633-0

Keywords

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Article

David F. Cheshire

Over the next few months a lively image of Dick Whittington and his cat will be making its appearance in the capital. Walking briskly along, with his cat trotting…

Abstract

Over the next few months a lively image of Dick Whittington and his cat will be making its appearance in the capital. Walking briskly along, with his cat trotting obediently behind or dashing ahead with its tail in the air, he will stride across the print and posters of the Museum of London as the Museum's new corporate image.

Details

New Library World, vol. 92 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-727-8

Abstract

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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