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Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Linda Lill

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how the labor shortage is described at the national level and how these problematizations correlate to gender and diversity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how the labor shortage is described at the national level and how these problematizations correlate to gender and diversity politics. The paper is overview of the governance of staff shortages in elderly care, how it is articulated and how the governmental scenario of solutions, which includes the channeling of unemployed migrants into elderly care. Politicians and public media describe the situation as desperate and the issue of the staff shortages in elderly care is described as a state of crisis. A highly profiled solution is to open up elderly care for unemployed migrants.

Design/methodology/approach

By analyzing specific management strategies for controlling a phenomenon, the paper will also be able to highlight values surrounding the phenomenon. The ambition is to understand how institutions, authorities and organizations handle practical forms of knowledge that are aimed to implement a particular policy or working method within the welfare system.

Findings

One important aspect of the findings is the ways in which these official political discourses link the issues of migration and the shortages of staff in elderly care. But also visualize factors in how the government bodies with the formal responsibilities and authorities express their concerns about these links and the quality of the elderly care more generally.

Originality/value

It is well-known that migrants are employed to take care of the growing population of elderly in Europe. In Spain and Italy, for example, immigrants are frequently employed directly by families to care for their elderly family members. This type of employment entails a series of new social risks. The most important of those risks is the global “care chain” that these arrangements incur for the sending families, who lose a family member on whom they depend. This paper is connecting the international research on the global “care chain,” but focuses on the Swedish context, where the migrants already are established and elderly care work is not linked to migration in the same way. However, the experience of migration and the importance of transnational and cultural knowledge can be influential in understanding the changing processes in Swedish elderly care, not the least as the question of staff recruitment has been linked to migration by the highest political levels.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Constant Okello‐Obura, M.K. Minishi‐Majanja, Linda Cloete and J.R. Ikoja‐Odongo

This article is a result of part of a doctoral study in the University of South Africa on the topic business information systems (BIS) design for Uganda's economic…

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Abstract

Purpose

This article is a result of part of a doctoral study in the University of South Africa on the topic business information systems (BIS) design for Uganda's economic development: the case of small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) in northern Uganda conducted between 2004 and 2007. The study was conducted to establish the characteristics of the SMEs, business activities, business information needs and recommend the important business information needs required for BIS for poor country or region. It was carried out on the assumption that businesses in northern Uganda are lagging behind because of lack of a BIS that could facilitate efficient and effective business information access. This article aims to discuss this subject.

Design/methodology/approach

The descriptive survey research design was used to collect the required data using structured questionnaires and semi‐structured interview guide. A sample size of 251 SMEs, 75 information providers and 25 business policy makers in northern Uganda were used. Quantitative data obtained were analysed using Epi Info and SPSS while the qualitative data by use of content analysis technique.

Findings

The findings reveal that SMEs in northern Uganda have varying background and are engaged in diverse/varied business activities with varying business information needs that require a multifaceted approach in the provision of business information. The study recommends that a BIS unique to the SMEs in northern Uganda be designed to provide among others business legal information, business technical information, business economic information, business contacts information and business management skills information.

Originality/value

No research has been carried out on the business information activities and needs of SMEs in northern Uganda with a view to design BIS. The findings of the study will help to shape the planning and implementation of strategic interventions to transform northern Uganda using information as a catalyst for development.

Details

Library Management, vol. 29 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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