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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Amber M. Epp and Linda L. Price

Macro-social disruptions and evolutions open up new possibilities for feeding the family. This paper aims to review prior constraints imposed by the gendered history of…

Abstract

Purpose

Macro-social disruptions and evolutions open up new possibilities for feeding the family. This paper aims to review prior constraints imposed by the gendered history of care work as part of the moral economy, with particular focus on how food traditions and routines reproduce family relations.

Design/methodology/approach

An assemblage perspective provides an appropriate theoretical lens to trace such emergent reconfigurations.

Findings

The paper takes as its focus three macro shifts with the potential to incite more and less intentional changes to the realities of feeding the family: changes in home life and organization of care, dads’ participation in feeding the family and innovation in food systems.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretical contributions reveal how shifting macro-social structures constrain and shape trajectories for the work of feeding the family.

Practical implications

Practical implications focus on how creative family members, marketers and policymakers influence arrangements, capacities and practices of family life.

Originality/value

This commentary brings an assemblage view of family life that proposes potential lines of flight when considering macro-context shifts, with particular attention to the relationship between food and family.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Jenniina Sihvonen and Linda Lisa Maria Turunen

Brand management and marketing have focused on brand-new goods, thus largely neglecting the emergence of markets for used products. This study sheds light on how consumers…

5825

Abstract

Purpose

Brand management and marketing have focused on brand-new goods, thus largely neglecting the emergence of markets for used products. This study sheds light on how consumers determine the perceived value of fashion brands in online flea markets. In addition, this study aims to illustrate how fashion brands are perceived when sold second-hand in Facebook flea markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data, consisting of internet discussions, were collected for this study from seven Facebook flea market forums between Fall 2014 and Fall 2015. The discussions were analyzed by means of qualitative content analysis.

Findings

In the context of flea markets, the perceived value is negotiated and evaluated through six antecedents: perceived quality, price, design, origin, authenticity and brand availability. Not surprisingly, price and quality appear as focal aspects when determining the value of a used brand in second-hand markets. However, the aspects of availability, origin and design complicate the considerations of the perceived value and can distinguish between different flea markets for fashion brands. In online second-hand markets for fashion brands, the passing of time appears to be an important factor grounding the consumers’ considerations of the perceived value.

Originality/value

This study brings forward novel viewpoints to brand marketing by discussing the formation of the consumer-perceived value in the growing field of online second-hand sales of fashion brands.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Robin A. Coulter, Lawrence F. Feick and Linda L. Price

Research conducted in the early 1990s in Hungary indicated a lack of knowledgeable and influential personal sources in the cosmetics product category. The purpose of this…

6730

Abstract

Research conducted in the early 1990s in Hungary indicated a lack of knowledgeable and influential personal sources in the cosmetics product category. The purpose of this article is to examine women cosmetics opinion leaders in Hungary approximately ten years into the country’s transition to a market economy. Because of the evolution of the cosmetics market over the past decade and Hungarian women’s increased involvement with cosmetics, we expected to see the emergence of opinion leadership in the product category. Survey data from 340 Hungarian women indicate that the incidence of cosmetics opinion leadership and self‐reported product knowledge is lower than what we might expect in more established market economies. Nonetheless, we found the relationships between cosmetics opinion leadership in Hungary and antecedent and consequent variables are similar to what we would expect in more established market economies. We discuss the implications of these results for marketing managers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 36 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Jagrook Dawra, Kanupriya Katyal and Vipin Gupta

The paper aims to study how deal- and bargaining-prone customers are different from each other. This paper brings out this difference based on psychographics encompassing…

1010

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to study how deal- and bargaining-prone customers are different from each other. This paper brings out this difference based on psychographics encompassing values – consciousness, price mavenism and personality orientations – needed for special treatment (distinctiveness and play).

Design/methodology/approach

The measurement model was assessed using both exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. The structural model was tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

This paper finds that value consciousness is a two-dimensional construct in the Indian context. This construct comprises two dimensions of value consciousness, including concern for price and concern for quality. The authors find that deal-prone customers are value conscious and price mavens. Bargaining-prone customers are value-conscious price mavens and have a high need for special treatment (play). Play orientation distinguishes between a deal-prone and a bargaining-prone customer.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to grocery products. The consumers surveyed were urban and educated Indians.

Practical implications

With the Indian markets being opened for Western retailers, it is imperative to study the Indian consumers. It is important to understand why the local neighborhood store is able to retain its customer base even when the organized fixed-price formats have been around for approximately 20 years.

Originality/value

This is one of the few papers that tries to understand the Indian consumer’s buying behavior, especially with respect to their haggling nature. This paper further develops our understanding of the “deal proneness” and “bargaining proneness” constructs. The authors also study their differences based on psychographics.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Lawrence Feick, Robin Higie Coulte and Linda L. Price

As Hungary makes the transition from a centrally‐planned to amarket‐based economy, its consumer markets are changing rapidly, with adeluge of new brands and products, new…

746

Abstract

As Hungary makes the transition from a centrally‐planned to a market‐based economy, its consumer markets are changing rapidly, with a deluge of new brands and products, new stores, variation in prices and the demise of old, familiar brands and stores. Reports on Hungarian consumers′ perceptions of their marketplace and their responses to changes in these markets based on research conducted from autumn 1989 to autumn 1992. Includes personal interviews, observation, focus groups and a survey of 300 female heads of households.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2016

Jakki J. Mohr, Linda L. Price and Aric Rindfleisch

The purpose of this chapter is fivefold. First, it highlights that, despite apparent progress, business in general, and marketing in particular, has made little impact…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is fivefold. First, it highlights that, despite apparent progress, business in general, and marketing in particular, has made little impact upon environmental sustainability. Second, it offers four explanations for the persistent challenges that contribute to this lack of meaningful progress. Third, it presents two theoretical lenses (i.e., assemblage theory and socio-ecological systems theory) for viewing environmental sustainability from new perspectives. Fourth, it offers a mid-range theory, biomimicry, to bridge the gap between these higher-level theories and managerial decisions on the ground. Finally, it offers implications and ideas for future research based on these persistent challenges and new perspectives.

Methodology/approach

Our paper is theoretical in focus. We offer a conceptual analysis of persistent challenges facing business efforts in environmental sustainability and suggest useful lenses to integrate marketing decisions more closely with our natural environment.

Findings

We present biomimicry as an actionable framework that seeks inspiration from nature and also explicitly grounds marketing decisions in the natural world.

Practical Implications

Our paper draws attention to the challenges facing firms seeking to achieve better performance in environmental sustainability. In addition, it offers a set of fresh theoretical perspectives as well as future issues for scholarly research in this domain.

Originality/value

Our work is designed to be provocative; it articulates reasons why business efforts in environmental sustainability do not scale to meaningful impact upon our planet and explores theoretical lenses by which those efforts could be more impactful.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Naresh K. Malhotra

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Linda L. Price, Eric J. Arnould and Sheila L. Deibler

Reports on a study looking at dimensions of service providerperformance that influence immediate emotional responses to serviceencounters, based on 914 service encounters…

7986

Abstract

Reports on a study looking at dimensions of service provider performance that influence immediate emotional responses to service encounters, based on 914 service encounters. Identifies five service‐provider dimensions that are significant predictors of emotional response to services. Finds that different service‐provider dimensions influence positive as compared with negative emotional responses and that temporal duration and spatial intimacy of the encounter affect both the reported levels and relative importance of these service‐provider dimensions to emotional responses.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-727-8

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-728-5

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