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Article

Linda Evans

This paper focuses on two inter‐related components of developing institutional research capacity in the social sciences: developing a research culture (of a specific…

Abstract

This paper focuses on two inter‐related components of developing institutional research capacity in the social sciences: developing a research culture (of a specific nature), and developing researchers. I use the term “researcher” in the context of this paper to refer both to academics for whom research is, or is intended to be, a component of their work and of their contractual responsibilities, and to those employed in research only roles. First, however, I address the issue of the need for development, outlining the shortcomings of social science research and, by extension and implication, of the research leadership that I suggest is failing – at least in part – to achieve its purpose of developing institutional research capacity.

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International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

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Article

Linda Evans

Abstract

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International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

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Article

Linda Evans

Abstract

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International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

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Article

Linda Evans

Abstract

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International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

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Article

Linda Evans

Abstract

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

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Article

Linda Evans

This paper represents a written, expanded, version of a keynote address presented at the Vitae Researcher Development International Conference, at the midland Hotel…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper represents a written, expanded, version of a keynote address presented at the Vitae Researcher Development International Conference, at the midland Hotel, Manchester, UK, in September 2011. It is intended both to contribute towards defining researcher development as a field of research and scholarship, and to motivate those with an interest in the field to go beyond mere description and to incorporate clarity, rigour and analytical depth into their work. Its specific objective is to propose a research agenda for researcher development and to present the case for this agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an analytical and conceptual paper. It presents the author's subjective views, illustrated, where appropriate, with examples of the author's conceptual and theoretical work. These underpin the research agenda for the field of researcher development.

Findings

There are no “findings” as such, only the author's perspective and observation that, as an emerging field of research and scholarship, researcher development must follow the path of academic rigour (e.g. analytical depth, conceptual clarity, definitional precision, and the development of theory and theoretical perspectives) if it is to achieve credibility within the academic community. The field also needs to widen its focus, it is argued, reflecting a broad interpretation of the concept of researcher development.

Originality/value

This is the first paper dedicated to an attempt to define the field. Its value also lies in its definitions and conceptualisations of researcher development, and its presentation of a taxonomy that deconstructs researcher development, revealing it to be multidimensional.

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Article

Robert W. Tucker, Walt J. McCoy and Linda C. Evans

A two‐year qualitative study with business leaders identifiedsalient dimensions of organisational culture (OC) which were thenoperationalised into a multiscale survey. The…

Abstract

A two‐year qualitative study with business leaders identified salient dimensions of organisational culture (OC) which were then operationalised into a multiscale survey. The Survey of Organisational Culture (SOC) was then employed in ten empirical studies to assess: reliability, validity, perceived usefulness to professional managers and the overall feasibility and adequacy of objective assessments of OC. The results indicate that reliable and meaningful information can be obtained that will be useful to managers.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article

Linda Evans

Abstract

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

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Book part

Esther Njoku, Huub Ruël, Hefin Rowlands, Linda Evans and Michael Murdoch

There is currently a proliferation of digital analytics and machine/artificial intelligence productivity tools for creating and sustaining competitive advantage through…

Abstract

There is currently a proliferation of digital analytics and machine/artificial intelligence productivity tools for creating and sustaining competitive advantage through strategic flexibility. Transformational e-HRM enables organizations to achieve and sustain competitive advantage through exploitation of these new productivity tools and approaches. However, it has been observed that many organizations have not been able to realize this. Using findings from an empirical exploration of e-HRM’s contribution to sustaining business performance, derived through an interpretative phenomenological analysis of a single case study, we propose in this chapter that for organizations to leverage the productivity gains of implementing Transformational e-HRM, HR and frontline managers require access to readily available artificial intelligence productivity tools. For e-HRM to contribute to sustaining business performance, we add to strategic flexibility theory that this can be realized by using e-HRM to enable strategic flexibility and adaptive capability. As we propose that it will be about organizations using the strategic capability derived by using Transformational e-HRM to create flexible and adaptive organizations. Its implications for practice are stated.

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HRM 4.0 For Human-Centered Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-535-2

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Article

Stanley Edward Taylor

The purpose of this paper is to identify the implications of recent changes in doctoral education for supervisors who are developing early career researchers in terms of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the implications of recent changes in doctoral education for supervisors who are developing early career researchers in terms of the need to develop their professionality.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper seeks to establish an historical benchmark in terms of the Von Humboldt model of doctoral education and the associated master‐apprentice model of supervision. It then sets out the key changes of the past three decades and summarises what is described as the post‐Humboldian doctorate. These changes are then related to the knowledge and skills needed for successful supervisory practice and to the professionality of research supervisors.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that the shift to the post‐Humboldtian doctorate has radically expanded the knowledge, understanding, and skills required by supervisors to successfully develop early career researchers and that these can be arrayed on a continuum represented by indicative characteristics of “restricted” to “extended” professionality as applied to supervisors.

Practical implications

The implications are that professional development programmes for supervisors developing early career researchers need to be reviewed in the light of how far they can support participants to make the full range of adjustments necessary to develop their own professionality as supervisors.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to apply the notion of professionality – and its “restricted”‐“extended” range – to the doctoral supervisory role.

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

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