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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Linda Dobrzanska

The measuring of emergency readmission rates to hospital following discharge is one of fifteen health outcomes the United Kingdom government monitors on an annual basis…

Abstract

The measuring of emergency readmission rates to hospital following discharge is one of fifteen health outcomes the United Kingdom government monitors on an annual basis. There is a wide variation between readmission rates, and it is especially important to older people that there is a reduction in unacceptable variations. A closer understanding of reasons for readmission is therefore necessary to inform future developments, identify patients who may be at high risk of readmission and target resources more appropriately. A review of literature from the United Kingdom and international studies may help in determining the reasons for the unplanned readmission of older people. This could then allow for a re‐allocation of resources in the most cost‐effective and cost‐efficient manner. The literature review was conducted via keywords and combination of keyword searches from 1990‐2003 using various electronic databases. There were several themes that emerged from the literature, and these have been described within the paper. Following the review of the literature it emerged that many international studies into the causes of readmission of older people have an inconsistent approach in defining certain terms. However, in the United Kingdom, there appears a more consistent approach. Most studies agree that the majority of readmissions occur as a result of a relapse or complication of an initial illness. However, some American studies associate the readmission of older people with a specific disease, and the antecedent care process. The findings in the literature have identified several gaps that enable recommendations for future research to be made.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Linda Dobrzanska, Debbie Crossland, Maggie Domanski and Sue Towriss

The Falls Exercise Prevention Programme for older people was introduced as a new project for North Bradford Primary Care Trust in 2002. The introduction of this new…

Abstract

The Falls Exercise Prevention Programme for older people was introduced as a new project for North Bradford Primary Care Trust in 2002. The introduction of this new service was in response to an identified need to help reduce the incidence of falls, reduce serious injuries as a result of falling, and help improve and maintain the quality of life for those older people who had been identified as having had a fall or being at high risk of falling. The service was not established to be a front line service but to be incorporated into the falls referral pathway. The exercises undertaken are all evidence based and proven to be effective with this population. However, the Group promotes other aspects of quality of life for older people and promotes a holistic approach including health promotion and education. The group has now expanded to incorporate a ‘Walking for Health’ project; a ‘Walk From Home’ project and a ‘Buddy‐Up’ system. The Group is continually growing and future plans are to incorporate ‘Walks for Fallers’. Evaluation of the service provides information to continually improve and extend the services on offer.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Ron Iphofen

Abstract

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Ron Iphofen

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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