Search results

1 – 10 of 226
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Linda Bennett

To assist library development staff in redefining who their library donors and constituency are in order to broaden the donor pool.

Abstract

Purpose

To assist library development staff in redefining who their library donors and constituency are in order to broaden the donor pool.

Design/methodology/approach

Uses strategies developed by fund‐raising efforts at the University of Michigan.

Findings

Cooperative development initiatives can lead to untapped fund‐raising opportunities by looking across campus and considering developing new relationships with departments and colleagues, thinking creatively about cultivation opportunities, and educating and finding ways to reward new friends.

Originality/value

Suggests ideas that lead to a library development program that can engage and touch lives on campus and in the community, which also can translate into fund‐raising opportunities.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Linda Bennett and Monica Landoni

This paper provides an analysis of the current state‐of‐the‐art in e‐books, and attempts both to set the scene and provide reasons for their low uptake.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides an analysis of the current state‐of‐the‐art in e‐books, and attempts both to set the scene and provide reasons for their low uptake.

Design/methodology/approach

The different approaches to e‐books of academic librarians, authors, publishers and readers are considered, using the results of a recent survey commissioned by the Joint Information Systems Committee.

Findings

The findings of this study make it clear that those who know about e‐books see them as potentially useful tools. However, a number of users of ICT resources are still unaware of e‐books even when their academic libraries' e‐book holdings is high. The lack of promotion from within the university, particularly from the academics, and to a certain extent from the librarians, is indeed a major reason for this knowledge gap.

Practical implications

Publishers, e‐book providers and aggregators, academics and intermediaries (i.e. librarians and information specialists) should concentrate on raising awareness of what is available and what are the advantages related to e‐books for specific categories of users. At the same time e‐book suppliers should make e‐books easier to find and purchase. Crucially, both the research and commercial development communities have to address these major issues: definition of common bench marks for research to progress; user‐centred design as a paradigm; better and stronger links with all stakeholders.

Originality/value

This paper offers a stepping stone for all parties interested in moving forwards to achieve this common goal.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Library Review, vol. 57 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Magda Vassiliou and Jennifer Rowley

This paper aims to propose a definition for the concept “e‐book” on the basis of an analysis of existing definitions. The e‐book marketplace is growing rapidly and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a definition for the concept “e‐book” on the basis of an analysis of existing definitions. The e‐book marketplace is growing rapidly and the potential impact of e‐books on publishers, librarian and users is increasing in significance. Yet, there is agreement that despite a few widely accepted definitions there is no consensus on the definition of the term e‐book, and, further that consensus on the definition would be beneficial for both researchers and practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper starts with a brief overview of the developments in e‐books, covering technologies, marketplaces, and the attractions and challenges associated with e‐books for users and libraries. It then reports on a content analysis of existing definitions of e‐book. A collection of definitions was compiled through an exhaustive literature review. Content analysis was performed to identify the frequency of occurrence of key words and phrases across these definitions.

Findings

There is a consensus that definitions of e‐book should include reference to: the digital or electronic nature of e‐books, analogy to printed book, some indication of the content of e‐books, and some allusion to e‐book technologies. We propose a two‐part definition that embraces these themes, but also reflects the in‐use features of the e‐book. Conclusions and recommendations make proposals for further discussion on the concept of e‐book and, more widely, into the publication, acquisition and use of e‐books.

Originality/value

In the rapidly developing e‐book marketplace it is essential to have agreement on the definition of e‐book, and furthermore, such a definition needs to reflect both the persistent characteristics of e‐books, and their dynamic and developing nature.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 23 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2013

Jessica Dutton

In 2001, the rape of “baby Tshepang” triggered a media frenzy in the small community of Louisvale, located in the Northern Cape of South Africa. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2001, the rape of “baby Tshepang” triggered a media frenzy in the small community of Louisvale, located in the Northern Cape of South Africa. The purpose of this chapter is to explore how gender discrimination and colonial discourse framed the way the rape of Tshepang was reported in print media.

Design/methodlogy/approach

From the newspaper archives of the Cape Town National Library, the University of Cape Town Library as well as newspaper articles found online, this chapter offers a reading of articles printed between 2001 and 2004. Patterns of troping were identified from the articles examined, and a number of themes were selected to be further examined using a gender perspective. Work already done by African feminist scholars on the grammar of rape was applied to deconstruct the ways in which the media presented this specific case. This chapter works with Sara Ahmed’s (2004) thoughts on shame, Linda Alcoff’s (1991) writing on Othering, Helen Moffett (2003a, 2003b, 2003c, 2006) and Jane Bennett’s (1997) work on gender and rape, as well as Achille Mbembe’s (2001) notion of facticity within colonial discourse.

Findings

This chapter argues that the ways in which the media understood this event were through well-worn stereotypes of Africa and women. An overarching theme of shame dominated how journalists represented the event. The label “A Town of Shame” stuck onto Louisvale through the mobilization of colonial and gender discourse. Quickly the town was known for its “barbaric” and “savage” existence; a town with no future and a disgrace to the country. Essentialist thinking about women was used to condemn and blame the mother of Tshepang, concretizing the myth that rape is always the fault of women.

Social Implications

Through relying on palatable stereotypes that create a self and Other, we move further away from engaging in the difficult questions of understanding rape. When rape becomes a spectacle, detached from the greater global socioeconomic realities, we deny our responsibilities of difficult and multilayered engagement.

Details

Gendered Perspectives on Conflict and Violence: Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-110-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Allan Metz

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the…

Abstract

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the Clinton presidency, systematically have sought to undermine this president with the goal of bringing down his presidency and running him out of office; and that they have sought non‐electoral means to remove him from office, including Travelgate, the death of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster, the Filegate controversy, and the Monica Lewinsky matter. This bibliography identifies these and other means by presenting citations about these individuals and organizations that have opposed Clinton. The bibliography is divided into five sections: General; “The conspiracy stream of conspiracy commerce”, a White House‐produced “report” presenting its view of a right‐wing conspiracy against the Clinton presidency; Funding; Conservative organizations; and Publishing/media. Many of the annotations note the links among these key players.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2009

Linda Morice

This article examines efforts of late nineteenth century educational reformers in Boston, Massachusetts (USA), to meet the pedagogical needs of an industrial age by…

Abstract

This article examines efforts of late nineteenth century educational reformers in Boston, Massachusetts (USA), to meet the pedagogical needs of an industrial age by balancing manual work and intellectual activity. Led by Swedish educator Gustaf Larsson and Boston philanthropist Pauline Agassiz Shaw, they employed traditional Swedish wood handcrafts (slojd, or ‘sloyd’ in English) to teach theoretical academic subjects and foster individualised learning. The reformers hoped to create, for students in kindergarten through to twelfth grade, a progression of manual work to parallel intellectual activities in the curriculum. That task became difficult as tool work moved from wood to steel, machines replaced hand tools, and artistic handcraft fell victim to efficient production. The school failed to sustain itself following the deaths of Shaw and Larsson. Today sloyd is credited as being a forerunner of technology education as well as an important influence on arts education in the United States.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Marie-Louise Fry, Josephine Previte and Linda Brennan

This paper aims to propose a new ecological systems-driven framework, underpinned by a relational marketplace lens, for social marketing practitioners to consider when…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a new ecological systems-driven framework, underpinned by a relational marketplace lens, for social marketing practitioners to consider when planning and designing programs. The authors contend that behavioural change does not occur in a vacuum and, as such, point to an ecology in which the individual is but one participant in a broader scope of social change activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is conceptual and presents the Indicators for Social Change Framework.

Findings

The Indicators for Social Change Framework puts forward a series of “must-have” indicators to consider when designing and planning social marketing programmes. Across identified indicators, the Framework delineates types of marketing actions to consider when planning for individual-oriented change and those required for wider systems-oriented change.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the broadening and deepening of the social marketing argument that reliance on individual behaviour change perspectives is not sufficient to resolve complex social problems that are inherently influenced by wider social forces. In transforming social change design, this paper transitions towards a logic view of social marketing that encourages and supports social change planners to be inclusive of interactions, processes and outcomes of value creation across the wider social marketing system.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Hiep Cong Pham, Linda Brennan, Lukas Parker, Nhat Tram Phan-Le, Irfan Ulhaq, Mathews Zanda Nkhoma and Minh Nhat Nguyen

Understanding the behavioral change process of system users to adopt safe security practices is important to the success of an organization’s cybersecurity program. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding the behavioral change process of system users to adopt safe security practices is important to the success of an organization’s cybersecurity program. This study aims to explore how the 7Ps (product, price, promotion, place, physical evidence, process and people) marketing mix, as part of an internal social marketing approach, can be used to gain an understanding of employees’ interactions within an organization’s cybersecurity environment. This understanding could inform the design of servicescapes and behavioral infrastructure to promote and maintain cybersecurity compliance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted an inductive qualitative approach using in-depth interviews with employees in several Vietnamese organizations. Discussions were centered on employee experiences and their perceptions of cybersecurity initiatives, as well as the impact of initiatives on compliance behavior. Responses were then categorized under the 7Ps marketing mix framework.

Findings

The study shows that assessing a cybersecurity program using the 7P mix enables the systematic capture of users’ security compliance and acceptance of IT systems. Additionally, understanding the interactions between system elements permits the design of behavioral infrastructure to enhance security efforts. Results also show that user engagement is essential in developing secure systems. User engagement requires developing shared objectives, localized communications, co-designing of efficient processes and understanding the “pain points” of security compliance. The knowledge developed from this research provides a framework for those managing cybersecurity systems and enables the design human-centered systems conducive to compliance.

Originality/value

The study is one of the first to use a cross-disciplinary social marketing approach to examine how employees experience and comply with security initiatives. Previous studies have mostly focused on determinants of compliance behavior without providing a clear platform for management action. Internal social marketing using 7Ps provides a simple but innovative approach to reexamine existing compliance approaches. Findings from the study could leverage proven successful marketing techniques to promote security compliance.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

1 – 10 of 226