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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Linda Arch

Since the global financial crisis of 2007-2009 academic research has paid considerable attention to understanding the nature of the crisis, its causes and consequences…

Abstract

Purpose

Since the global financial crisis of 2007-2009 academic research has paid considerable attention to understanding the nature of the crisis, its causes and consequences. This is not surprising given the scale and scope of the crisis. Much of this research has been undertaken within social science disciplines. At the same time, the crisis has also been the subject of fiction – novels, poetry and drama, and there is also a small body of academic scholarship on fiction relating to the crisis (and on finance in fiction more generally). The purpose of this paper is to suggest that fiction can offer a new perspective on the global financial crisis and thereby enhance our understanding of it.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploration draws upon three works of post-crisis fiction: the 2009 play by David Hare, The Power of Yes: A Dramatist Seeks to Understand the Financial Crisis (hereafter The Power of Yes); Other People’s Money, a novel by Justin Cartwright (2011); and Robert Harris’s novel The Fear Index also published in 2011. Its approach is based on close readings of the three texts in question.

Findings

Finance fiction stimulates a reconceptualization of the global financial crisis as a crisis of innovation and technological change.

Originality/value

This paper is a viewpoint article. The originality lies in the author’s interpretation of reading the global financial crisis through fiction.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Linda Arch

This paper is a “viewpoint” article, and as such, the purpose of this paper is to present the author’s opinion and interpretation. Its primary purpose is to propose seven…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a “viewpoint” article, and as such, the purpose of this paper is to present the author’s opinion and interpretation. Its primary purpose is to propose seven guiding principles for effective bank regulation so that these may be subject to academic criticism.

Design/methodology/approach

The principal theme of this paper has its origins in archival research into the nature of bank regulation in the UK in 25 to 30 years after the Second World War. This paper draws upon insights gained into the nature of bank regulation in the UK arising from that research. It focuses on what aspects of bank regulation were effective in that earlier period. It then attempts to convert those insights into underlying principles.

Findings

Seven principles are proposed as the starting point for a discussion as to the principles that should underpin effective bank regulation. The seven principles are set out in the introduction to the paper.

Originality/value

The framework for the regulation of banks in the UK and in many other countries is a complex one. The general trend in bank regulation in the UK in the past four decades has been technocratic, characterised by a preference for codified rules, which are often detailed and technically complex. It has also been characterised by the establishment, or further development, of intricate regulatory and supervisory structures at national, international and supranational levels. Scholarly attention has understandably been focused on those trends. Rather less attention has been given to the broader principles that might underpin and guide bank regulation. This paper seeks to contribute to that question.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2011

Arch G. Woodside and Linda Jane Coleman

Drama enactments by trainees (DETs) include verbal and contextual exchanges by two or more trainees in customer–server dramas usually in the presence of trainee observers…

Abstract

Drama enactments by trainees (DETs) include verbal and contextual exchanges by two or more trainees in customer–server dramas usually in the presence of trainee observers and trainers. DETs' objectives include nurturing the conscious, decoding unconscious thinking and action, and informing learning of customer–server exchanges. Training in DETs provides an opportunity to practice which increases knowledge and skills necessary for performing customer–server exchanges accurately and achieving high customer satisfaction. This chapter is a case study report on an in-class drama enactment of a hotel guest and receptionist face-to-face encounter. The enactment includes face-to-face conversations between two actors and within selves.

Details

Tourism Sensemaking: Strategies to Give Meaning to Experience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-853-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2010

Carlynn Woolsey

This chapter reports on how to assess the usefulness of official tourism websites; the study applies for information audit rubrics to assess the marketing websites for…

Abstract

This chapter reports on how to assess the usefulness of official tourism websites; the study applies for information audit rubrics to assess the marketing websites for three cities in the state of California. The study provides tools that may be useful for designing destination websites to include information that visitors find useful. The three focal cities include Los Angeles (discoverlosangeles.com), San Diego (sandiego.org), and San Francisco (onlyinsanfrancisco.com). One of the hypotheses that the study examines is that destination websites are assessable in order of good, better, best. Findings: San Francisco provides the most useful information and is likely to be the most successful official tourism website. The assessment of San Francisco as the best website is the outcome of applying macro and micro rubrics covering: general and practical information, ability to book a vacation, digital and print materials, use of media components, and partnerships.

Details

Tourism-Marketing Performance Metrics and Usefulness Auditing of Destination Websites
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-901-5

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Allan Metz

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the…

Abstract

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the Clinton presidency, systematically have sought to undermine this president with the goal of bringing down his presidency and running him out of office; and that they have sought non‐electoral means to remove him from office, including Travelgate, the death of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster, the Filegate controversy, and the Monica Lewinsky matter. This bibliography identifies these and other means by presenting citations about these individuals and organizations that have opposed Clinton. The bibliography is divided into five sections: General; “The conspiracy stream of conspiracy commerce”, a White House‐produced “report” presenting its view of a right‐wing conspiracy against the Clinton presidency; Funding; Conservative organizations; and Publishing/media. Many of the annotations note the links among these key players.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2016

Arch G. Woodside

The traditional and still dominant logic among nearly all empirical positivist researchers in schools of management is to write symmetric (two-directional) variable…

Abstract

Synopsis

The traditional and still dominant logic among nearly all empirical positivist researchers in schools of management is to write symmetric (two-directional) variable hypotheses (SVH) even though the same researchers formulate their behavioral theories at the case (typology) identification level. Cyert and March’s (1963), Cyert, R. M., & March, J. G. (1963). A behavioral theory of the firm. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall), Howard and Sheth’s (1969, Howard, J. A., & Sheth, J. N. (1969). The theory of buyer behavior. New York, NY: Wiley), and Miles, R. E., & Snow, C. C.’s (1978, Miles, R. E., & Snow, C. C. (1978). Organizational strategy, structure, and process. [A. D. Meyer, collaborator; H. J. Coleman Jr., contributor]. New York, NY: McGraw Hill) typologies of organizations’ strategy configurations (e.g., “Prospectors, Analyzers, and Defenders”) are iconic examples of formulating theory at the case identification level. When testing such theories, most researchers automatically, nonconsciously, switch from building theory of beliefs, attitudes, and behavior at the case identification level to empirically testing of two-directional relationships and additive net-effect influences of variables. Formulating theory focusing on creating case identification hypotheses (CIH) to describe, explain, and predict behavior and then empirically testing at SVH is a mismatch and results in shallow data analysis and frequently inaccurate contributions to theory. This chapter describes the mismatch and resulting unattractive outcomes as well as the pervasive practice of examining only fit validity in empirical studies using symmetric tests. The chapter reviews studies in the literature showing how matching both case-based theory and empirical positivist research of CIH is possible and produces findings that advance useful theory and critical thinking by executives and researchers.

Details

Case Study Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-461-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 December 2016

Chyi Jaw, James Po-Hsun Hsiao, Tzung-Cheng (T. C.) Huan and Arch G. Woodside

This chapter describes and tests the principles of configural theory in the context of hospitality frontline service employees’ happiness-at-work and managers’ assessments…

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This chapter describes and tests the principles of configural theory in the context of hospitality frontline service employees’ happiness-at-work and managers’ assessments of these employees’ quality of work performances. The study proposes and tests empirically a configural asymmetric theory of the antecedents to hospitality employee happiness-at-work and managers’ assessments of employees’ quality of work performance. The findings confirm and go beyond prior statistical findings of small-to-medium effect sizes of happiness-performance relationships. The method includes matching cases of data from surveys of employees (n = 247) and surveys completed by their managers (n = 43) and uses qualitative comparative analysis via the software program fsQCA.com. The findings support the four principles of configural analysis and theory construction: recognize equifinality of different solutions for the same outcome; test for asymmetric solutions; test for causal asymmetric outcomes for very high versus very low happiness and work performance; and embrace complexity. The theory and findings confirm that configural theory and research resolves perplexing happiness–performance conundrums. The study provides algorithms involving employees’ demographic characteristics and their assessments of work facet-specifics which are useful for explaining very high happiness-at-work and high quality-of-work performance (as assessed by managers) – as well as algorithms explaining very low happiness and very low quality-of-work performance.

Article
Publication date: 26 January 2010

Explains that McDonald's UK has become one of the first organizations to earn the new Investors in People (IIP) gold award.

1646

Abstract

Purpose

Explains that McDonald's UK has become one of the first organizations to earn the new Investors in People (IIP) gold award.

Design/methodology/approach

Concentrates on the results of an employee survey carried out in the context of the IIP assessment.

Findings

Reveals that almost 80 percent of people who work at McDonald's UK feel proud to work for the company. Highlights other areas in which the company scored particularly strongly.

Practical implications

Details the requirements of the new gold, silver and bronze awards from IIP.

Social implications

Highlights the risks of relying on stereotypes, which present the “McJob” as unstimulating, poorly paid and with few prospects.

Originality/value

Offers useful information for organizations contemplating aiming for the IIP gold award.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Elaine Robinson

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate a reflective use of literary devices, within an over‐arching concept of narrative, in practical coaching. The paper also aims to…

2531

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate a reflective use of literary devices, within an over‐arching concept of narrative, in practical coaching. The paper also aims to show the benefits of working with literary devices within the coaching relationship and provide a few practitioner tips.

Design/methodology/approach

Using case study methodology and based on the recorded field notes of five participating coachees, the nature of the relationship between coach and coachee in coaching conversations forms the empirical basis of the paper. A framework of sub‐headings of different forms of narrative; stream of consciousness, metaphor, time and space, analepsis, prolepsis and focalisation are applied to the case studies in the context of coaching sessions. The analysis includes reflections of the coach.

Findings

Literary language devices associated with narrative can be applied in the coaching context. Such techniques can be used for the analysis and interpretation of coaching conversations to enable sense‐making and enhancement of insightful questioning, interpretation and reflective practice.

Research limitations/implications

There are many other literary devices which could be studied and applied to coaching both as part of reflective practice and in coaching supervision.

Practical implications

There is a need for active listening by the coach and a heightened awareness of literary techniques and deep culture to explore and probe meanings through narratives embedded within coaching conversations.

Originality/value

Literary techniques are used as a means to analyse the coaching relationship and for the discovery of insightful coaching questions and reflective practice.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 29 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Linda Deigh and Jillian Dawes Farquhar

The purpose of this study is to contribute to the theory and practice of financial services marketing in sub-Saharan Africa (sSA) by investigating how financial service…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to contribute to the theory and practice of financial services marketing in sub-Saharan Africa (sSA) by investigating how financial service providers are developing corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices, in particular, seeking to uncover the involvement of stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an interpretivist approach, the study uncovers fresh and context-rich insights through an analysis of a multiple case study consisting of retail banks in Ghana. Data consist of semi-structured interviews with senior managers and analysis of documents and archives.

Findings

The study uncovers three key CSR practices practised by the retail banks: giving, community and corporate reputation/brand with which their stakeholders are only to some extent involved. Banks not as yet drawing extensively on stakeholder resources for CSR practices.

Research limitations/implications

The study uses an inductive and in-depth approach to explore contextual insights into CSR, but with subsequent limitations on how far the findings can be extended.

Practical implications

The study offers outline for financial services marketing involving stakeholders in CSR.

Social implications

It discovers that banks acquire social capital through their CSR activities in the community.

Originality/value

The study contributes to financial services marketing theory and practice through an evidence-based framework uncovering the development of CSR through practices that as yet draw on stakeholder resources to a limited extent. Research suggests that CSR practices are dynamic and subject to a range of situational conditions.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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