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Book part
Publication date: 13 November 2014

Boqiong Yang

After three decades of reform and opening up, China’s economy has experienced huge changes. Against the background of economic globalization, foreign direct investment…

Abstract

After three decades of reform and opening up, China’s economy has experienced huge changes. Against the background of economic globalization, foreign direct investment (FDI) plays an important role in China’s economy. China has become one of the world’s largest FDI inflow countries, which has had an important impact on its economic development. FDI has preferred the industrial sector, which also has serious environmental pollution. This study will consider vertical and horizontal FDI location choice theory and conduct theoretical analysis concerning the FDI location choice within the industrial sectors, as well as empirical analysis to test the distribution of FDI in pollution-intense industries. Furthermore, the “Catalog of Industries for Foreign Investment” is one of China’s important industrial policies to guide foreign investment. Since being implemented in 1995, it has made five adjustments. The analysis of the distribution of FDI in the polluting industries and the impact of the change process will provide advice instructive for the government to amend the catalog.

Details

Globalization and the Environment of China
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-179-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Kofi Agyekum, Seth Yeboah Botchway, Emmanuel Adinyira and Alex Opoku

Recent reports based on the sustainable development goals (SDGs) have revealed that no country is in line with achieving the targets of the 2030 Agenda for sustainable…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent reports based on the sustainable development goals (SDGs) have revealed that no country is in line with achieving the targets of the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development, with the slowest progress being witnessed mainly on goals that are focused on the environment. This study examines environmental performance indicators for assessing the sustainability of building projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses an explanatory sequential design with an initial quantitative instrument phase, followed by a qualitative data collection phase. An extensive critical comparative review of the literature resulted in the identification of ten environmental sustainability indicators. One hundred and sixty-seven questionnaire responses based upon these indicators from the Ghanaian construction industry were received. Data were coded with SPSS v22, analysed descriptively, and via inferential analysis. These data were then validated through semi-structured interviews with six interviewees who are fellows of their respective professional bodies, a senior academic (professor in construction project delivery) and a government official. Data obtained from the semi-structured validation interviews were analysed through the side-by-side comparison of the qualitative data with the quantitative data.

Findings

The findings from the study suggest that all the indicators were important in assessing building projects' environmental sustainability across the entire life cycle. Key among the identified indicators is the effects of the project on “water quality, air quality, energy use and conservation, and environmental compliance and management”. The interviewees further agreed to and confirmed the importance of these identified indicators for assessing the environmental sustainability of building projects in Ghana.

Originality/value

Compared to existing studies, this study adopts the exploratory sequential design to identify and examine the critical indicators in assessing the environmental sustainability across the entire lifecycle of building projects in a typical developing country setting, i.e. Ghana. It reveals areas of prime concern in the drive to place the local construction industry on a trajectory towards achieving environmental sustainability.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2013

Paulette Hebert, Mihyun Kang and Jessy Kramp

The purpose of this paper is to examine safety lighting at an existing US government facility.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine safety lighting at an existing US government facility.

Design/methodology/approach

Field measurements of exterior illumination were conducted at four building sites housing laboratories, offices and a cafeteria at night and the findings were compared to the industry recommendations, the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) safety lighting recommendations.

Findings

Laboratory, office and cafeteria building exteriors were classified as “high hazard” due to area wildlife, potentially dangerous equipment and chemicals, the threat of intruders, and uneven terrain. Some sites' existing light levels fell far below industry recommendations and others greatly exceeded recommendations. Most of the existing lighting was uneven, unsustainable, rendered colors poorly, produced glare and/or remained energized when no one was present.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by the small number of sites and limited geographical area of the sites. Lighting field studies can improve user safety, save energy and reduce facilities' waste.

Practical implications

This study employs a relatively simple approach to examine safety lighting that facility managers could adapt for their own facilities to inform improvements.

Originality/value

The current lack of lighting field studies, safety lighting research and case studies regarding government facilities is addressed by contributions of this research.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2020

Hai Hong Dinh

This paper mentions the quick reactions of Vietnam to avoid explosive catastrophes before and during the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic. The work presented here…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper mentions the quick reactions of Vietnam to avoid explosive catastrophes before and during the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic. The work presented here has profound implications for future research of disaster response and preparation for future pandemics. In order to estimate the causal general effect of the pandemic, the authors have to do a quantitative survey at the end of the pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The difference in damage caused by the pandemic between the great powers and Vietnam is the quick reaction. It plays a decisive role. In attempting to tackle emerging phenomena in the pandemic, this study is deliberately broad-based. Considerable attention is given to explaining each methodological choice. It centers on a core case of Vietnam. Using data from multiple methods, it adopts publish media and contemporary research during the pandemic as a way to draw out key themes within the core case.

Findings

The paper focuses on the lessons for the post-pandemic consist of the Buddhist conception (cause and effect) based on the quick reaction of the Vietnamese government and the adaptation of Vietnamese people. This is a key success for the future anti-pandemic process.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is not exploring the pandemic within a larger scale of all nations to approach a general lesson for the world.

Practical implications

The success of the first anti-pandemic phase does not guarantee that subsequent efforts will be successful. Respecting the “opponent” (the coronavirus) is the best way to avoid falling into the deadly subjective trap that some great powers have encountered.

Social implications

This article highlights the rapid response of the Vietnamese before and during the coronavirus pandemic. From that, the article draws some lessons for the next similar disasters based on the cause and effect.

Originality/value

A quick reaction is one of the most important ways to deal with any disaster. After a half year of the coronavirus pandemic spread, Vietnam has 408 infectious cases and no deaths within 96,208,984 people (The Ministry of Health of Vietnam on July 22nd, 2020). Vietnam achieved success with the least expensive price that should be finding in risks and issues in the future.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 January 2018

Odhiambo Odera, Albert Scott and Jeff Gow

This paper aims to identify factors influencing and shaping community perceptions of oil companies which present fertile ground for a better understanding of their actions.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify factors influencing and shaping community perceptions of oil companies which present fertile ground for a better understanding of their actions.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology is adopted where primary data were collected through semi-structured interviews from members of three communities in the Niger Delta: Ogbunabali community in Port Harcourt (Rivers State), Biogbolo community in Yenagoa (Bayelsa State) and Ogunu community in Warri (Delta State). The interview data were recorded, transcribed and qualitatively analysed using content analysis with NVivo software.

Findings

Perceptions regarding negative and positive aspects of the oil companies were identified. These included environmental concerns; lack of compensation; health effects; lack of social development; neglect of communities; not creating employment opportunities; and providing community and educational support.

Research limitations/implications

A major limitation regards the small number of respondents selected from the communities. The sample of the interviewees was constrained by their availability and accessibility, which might have injected some bias. Gathering data from other stakeholders such as non-governmental organisations, consumers, investors and creditors may provide a deeper understanding of social and environmental practices. Another approach would be to extend this study by examining the perceptions of relevant government officials towards social and environmental concerns in developing countries.

Originality/value

The qualitative research methodology utilised in this study uses content analysis to examine views of communities about oil companies’ commitments to their social and environmental concerns. An understanding of social and environmental commitments allows diverse stakeholders such as communities to become more engaged with issues affecting them.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 January 2018

Terence Garrett

In the Rio Grande Valley, natural gas corporations have proposed building up to five export terminals for shipping to overseas locations liquefied natural gas (LNG). The…

Abstract

Purpose

In the Rio Grande Valley, natural gas corporations have proposed building up to five export terminals for shipping to overseas locations liquefied natural gas (LNG). The LNG terminals constructed would have adverse consequences for the people living in the area. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the conflict between citizen groups and corporations.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a narrative approach, theories by Boje, Debord, Bauman and Best and Kellner, the paper analyzes and tests the strategies and resources and stories utilized by proponents and opponents of the LNG terminals in the Port of Brownsville. Examined are internet media as artifacts for the analysis, in addition to an evaluation of political protests and demonstrations.

Findings

Corporate globalization may be halted because of resistance put forth by local opponents – citizen and environmental groups – offering resistance due to perceptions that the local economy and environment may be severely damaged.

Research limitations/implications

LNG corporate expansion continues globally. The research provides a glimpse into one how one locality may resist capitalist domination, protecting its own economy and environment.

Practical implications

The assessment provides a practical means to examine how local resistance may successfully avert unwanted fossil fuel industries.

Social implications

Local citizens’ groups may have the means necessary to stop the LNG terminals from locating in the Rio Grande Valley; however, capitalist globalization may be too much of an irresistible force to overcome.

Originality/value

This research paper demonstrates the conflict inherent to globalization through the economic and environmental consequences that occur when citizen groups oppose corporate fossil fuel expansion into their community.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 August 2018

Jamie Jones and Peter Bryant

In the summer of 2014, a large energy company was poised to begin expanding its unconventional natural gas operations in northeastern British Columbia in the hopes of…

Abstract

In the summer of 2014, a large energy company was poised to begin expanding its unconventional natural gas operations in northeastern British Columbia in the hopes of capitalizing on the Canadian province's determination to build a liquid natural gas industry. The company had secured mineral rights from the province but had not simultaneously pursued surface rights from a First Nation community that historically had used the land. When a seismic exploration team appeared on the tribe's traditional territory without consulting it, as was customary (and in some cases legally required), the company unwittingly ignited a firestorm of protest from both First Nation and non First Nation local citizens. Recognizing the importance of social acceptance both to operations and profitability, the company sent senior vice president Maria Paquet to participate in fireside discussions with tribal, regional government, and environmental leaders in the hopes of finding some common ground. Could these leaders arrive at sufficient trust and agreement to allow the company to move forward with its plans? Or would the company face gridlock, community blocking, or even financial peril? In a small-group role-playing exercise, students will step into the shoes of each of these stakeholders as they try to forge a path forward that is acceptable to all.

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2022

Olubunmi Comfort Ade-Ojo

The study aims to assess the gap in the awareness of the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) requirements for green housing development among…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to assess the gap in the awareness of the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) requirements for green housing development among built-environment professionals in meeting the housing need in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is a cross-sectional survey of built-environment professionals in the Physical Planning Units (PPUs) of Federal Tertiary Educational Institutions in South-Western Nigeria. The LEED v4 scoring system for New Construction and Renovation was adopted for the survey questionnaire on five point Likert scale. Data were analyzed using the MIS and Kruskal–Wallis Rank sum Test.

Findings

Awareness of the LEED requirements varies across the categories. Sustainable site is ranked first while innovation and regional priority ranked from the rear. There is variation in awareness among the professionals. The Land Surveyors are followed by the Architects while the Builders ranked last.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of the study is limited to the professionals in the PPUs in the study area. However, the findings are indicative. The low level of awareness of some of the requirements and the extent of variation among the professionals will negatively impact the integrated design approach and collaborative effort needed for green housing to meet the housing deficit in Nigeria.

Practical implications

The study is limited in scope. The low level of awareness of the requirements coupled with the extent of variation among the professionals will negatively impact the integrated design approach and collaborative effort needed for green housing to meet the huge housing deficit in Nigeria.

Originality/value

The study takes the lead to assess the awareness of the requirements for green housing development based on the LEED impact categories. Improving the awareness of these requirements will enhance their implementation and consequently impact the quality of housing provision. The professionals need to bridge the knowledge gap to enhance collaboration and productivity for green housing development.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Rajendra Ramlogan

Focuses on the direct and indirect impact of environmental abuse on human wellbeing. In some instances, the impact of environmental abuse on human health is not still…

4459

Abstract

Focuses on the direct and indirect impact of environmental abuse on human wellbeing. In some instances, the impact of environmental abuse on human health is not still unknown, merely being subject to scientific suspicion. This would suggest caution and the need for preventive measures to be applied. The threat to human health from environmental factors is not an isolated problem that exists on a national level. There are environmental factors that affect human health on a global level or are so widespread as to be considered global problems. Other environmental problems cross national boundaries and achieve regional importance.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 February 2015

Haiping Zhao, Qingxue Li and Jianhua Tao

Several multivariate statistical methods were comprehensively used to interpret the temporal, spatial patterns and source identification of surface water pollution in…

Abstract

Several multivariate statistical methods were comprehensively used to interpret the temporal, spatial patterns and source identification of surface water pollution in Bohai Bay with the large and complex data. Twelve variables water quality indices were surveyed at 12 sites three times a year (May, August, and October) from 1995 to 2005. Cluster analysis (CA) grouped the eleven years into two clusters, Cluster A (1995 to 2001 except 1998) and cluster B (2002 to 2005 and 1998), and spatial CA divided the entire area into three groups. The results of discriminant analysis showed that the temporal CA and spatial CA were effective with 90% and 83.3% correct assignments, respectively. In cluster A, the pollution sources mainly were nutrient factor from non-point source and Hg pollution, oil and organic pollutions were relatively light. In Cluster B, the organic pollution became the mainly pollution source, and the nutrient pollution was still serious problem. In the results of spatial analysis, the group 1 was mainly affected by anthropogenic pollution, the group 3 was seriously affected by oil spill pollution and nutrients pollution, and the group 2 reflected relatively strong water self-purification ability.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

Keywords

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