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Article
Publication date: 18 February 2020

Netra Neelam, Pratima Sheorey, Sonali Bhattacharya and Monica Kunte

Lifelong learning has gained significant research attention world over because of its potential to enhance and ensure continuous employability. However, role of higher…

Abstract

Purpose

Lifelong learning has gained significant research attention world over because of its potential to enhance and ensure continuous employability. However, role of higher education institute as a learning organization to develop lifelong learning attitudes among young adults has not been discussed much. Parameters that determine lifelong learning among working professionals or school-going children may differ from that of prospective managers studying in business schools. Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) have given guidelines on learning organization in higher education context which has not been empirically tested. The present study aims to develop a scale on learning organization based on the OECD guideline. It also aims to explore the impact of learning organization and learning processes on lifelong learning attitude in Indian business schools.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study develops a multidimensional scale to measure business schools’ perceived level of performance as a learning organization from the perspective of faculty. The scale considers a learning organization as a multidimensional second-order construct comprising organizational climate for learning, leadership support for knowledge exchange, support for innovation, applied research environment and vision communication. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) has been used to refine and validate the scale. The study also assesses the impact of business schools’ performance as learning organization on perceived learning processes and lifelong learning attitude from the perspective of business school students by using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The study reveals that a learning organization is characterized by organizational climate for learning, leadership support for knowledge exchange, support for innovation, applied research environment and vision communication. Learning organization determines both perceived learning processes (ß = 0.397) and lifelong learning attitude (ß = 0.259). The relationship between learning organization and lifelong learning partially mediates through learning processes (Sobel’s statistics = 1.82, p-value = 0.068, indirect effect = 29%). Lifelong learning is characterized by self-regulated reflective learning with knowledge gained through various sources including virtual sources.

Originality/value

Literature adequately speaks about various scales on learning organization, but there is no specific scale developed, so far, for higher education institutes. Thus, the unique contribution of the present study is the development of a new scale on learning organization based on OECD guidelines on higher education. The scale has been developed based on survey of faculty members and students of Indian business schools. The scale can be used to assess academicians’ perception toward effectiveness of a learning organization. Such information would help in formulating strategies on what should be the characteristics of teaching–learning process, knowledge acquisition and knowledge dissemination to ensure lifelong learning and continuous employability.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2020

Valeriu Frunzaru and Nicoleta Corbu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate to what extent secondary school students’ interest in intellectual development influences key abilities necessary to cope with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate to what extent secondary school students’ interest in intellectual development influences key abilities necessary to cope with the future of work. In the ever-changing world of work, deeply influenced by new technologies and cultural diversity in the workforce, young people must develop three essential traits to increase their capacity to quickly adapt to the situation in the labour market: openness to lifelong learning, critical thinking skills related to online information (of which online fact-checking is a key component) and openness to a multicultural society. In this paper, it is argued that these traits are directly related to young people’s interest in intellectual development but that additional interdependencies between these three traits complicate this equation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a survey of secondary school students in the 12th grade (N = 1221). A hypothesized conceptual model was tested with AMOS software for structural equation modelling.

Findings

The findings show that students who are more interested in intellectual development are more open to lifelong learning. The relationship between intellectualism and lifelong learning is also mediated by online fact-checking. Moreover, the higher the interest in lifelong learning, the higher the openness to multiculturality. There is, however, no direct relationship between interest in intellectual development and multiculturality.

Practical implications

The results of this study will help making recommendations to three key stakeholders: young people, teachers and policymakers. They could have a practical impact on the labour market in the future.

Originality/value

This paper examines a topic that has not been systematically studied, namely, the possible influence of intellectualism on the future of work. The findings highlight the possible negative effects of a lack of interest in intellectual development on lifelong learning, living and working in a multicultural environment and processing online information.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Gillian Leader

The lifelong learning agenda maintains a pivotal role in educational discourse. It reflects government policy that as a conceptual framework it is shaping a new model of…

5351

Abstract

The lifelong learning agenda maintains a pivotal role in educational discourse. It reflects government policy that as a conceptual framework it is shaping a new model of learning. Moreover, it reinforces the view that the establishment of a learning society is vital to meet the growing diversity of economic and social imperatives. This paper explores some of the challenges facing further education in constructing an effective and vocational paradigm for lifelong learning that addresses the impact of widening participation and accessibility. It highlights the significance of recent post‐16 government initiatives and the relationship between a knowledge economy and the inclusive learning agenda in the context of policy and practice.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 45 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2020

Pei Cheng Ooi

This paper presents an overview of a lifelong learning scheme. It outlines the design of the scheme that was initially targeted for electrical and electronic engineering…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents an overview of a lifelong learning scheme. It outlines the design of the scheme that was initially targeted for electrical and electronic engineering students and later students across the faculty of engineering in the University of Nottingham Malaysia (UNM). The scheme named “Students’ Continuing Personal Development (S-CPD)” is developed to improve student participation in extra-curricular activities and at the same time, to create awareness among students of the importance of lifelong learning and to facilitate the development of such skills.

Design/methodology/approach

The scheme involves creating and developing more than 30 categories of activities together with a well-structured information technology infrastructure. Various strategies, such as offering awards, are applied to promote student engagement. In 2015 the pilot scheme was rolled out in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus and adopted by all departments in the faculty of engineering in the subsequent year.

Findings

S-CPD scheme is aligned to the importance institutions of engineers in the world places on continuing professional development and also to the importance industry and employer places on transferable skills. The scheme provides students with a structured way to plan, participate and record their participation in extra-curricular activities that is relevant to their future careers as engineers in a holistic way. S-CPD scheme not only provides a good platform for students to hone particular “soft” skills and they are also aware of the importance and engaging in lifelong learning to make the most out of their university and also life experience.

Research limitations/implications

This research could lead to many other studies including the factors that affect students' engagement in extra-curricular activities, short-term and long-term impacts of S-CPD scheme, and also involve psychology research such as psychological factors influencing students' engagement in the scheme.

Practical implications

This scheme could be repeated in worldwide university programmes.

Originality/value

The S-CPD scheme can be viewed as having a two-pronged growth strategy. The first is to engage students in extra-curricular activities that enhance and improve their learning and personal experiences. The second prong of the growth strategy is to inculcate the growth mindset for lifelong learning, hence adapting well when their profession involves fulfilling CPD requirements.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2016

Elita Amini Virmani, Ann-Marie Wiese and Peter L. Mangione

This chapter reviews conceptualizations of parent involvement and family engagement as they aim to support children’s learning and development and introduces the reader to…

Abstract

This chapter reviews conceptualizations of parent involvement and family engagement as they aim to support children’s learning and development and introduces the reader to relational family engagement, a new approach to engaging families in their children’s early learning. Relational family engagement is discussed as central to effectively engaging culturally and linguistically diverse families as active contributors to their children’s lifelong success as learners. The authors delineate three principles fundamental to relational family engagement, supported by an interdisciplinary review of research. Reflective practice is explored as a pathway to relational family engagement. The authors assert that the integration of reflective practice holds promise as a way to facilitate and deepen relationships among staff in early childhood programs, between the early childhood education program staff and families, and between families and children, such that children’s early learning experiences are enhanced across both home and preschool contexts while drawing upon their families’ cultural and linguistic assets.

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Haley Wing Chi Tsang and Eric Tsui

This paper aims to describe a conceptual design of Personal Learning Environment & Network (PLE&N) and a learning model developed in support of peer-based social and

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a conceptual design of Personal Learning Environment & Network (PLE&N) and a learning model developed in support of peer-based social and lifelong learning in higher education, which collaborate with classroom learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The model consists of students, instructors and external parties interacting synergistically in learning in PLE&N-enabled courses based on the collaborative designs of instructor-led pedagogical approach and external parties-assisted lifelong learning “first-mover” development. The research constructs, tests and assesses this model in courses of 12 subjects in nearly two years.

Findings

The practicality of the designs is evidenced in post-course surveys and reflected by students’ ability in productively using collaborative resources over the internet to create an ever-expanding personal learning space stretching from home to campus and beyond, oriented toward individuality, universality, ubiquity, interactivity and connectivity.

Originality/value

The research contributes to PLE&N, social and lifelong learning seamless integration in theory and practice to dramatically enhance students’ virtual learning skills.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Rick Holden, Vikki Smith and Dave Devins

Explores the impact of the establishment of a learning centre, within an industrial estate, on the development of lifelong learning in the workplace. It draws on data…

1585

Abstract

Explores the impact of the establishment of a learning centre, within an industrial estate, on the development of lifelong learning in the workplace. It draws on data generated as part of an evaluation of a European social fund project to establish information and communication technology (ICT) based learning centres on each of three industrial estates in the East Midlands. The project sought to develop amongst participating companies and their employees a commitment to continuous development and lifelong learning. The purpose of the paper is to focus analysis upon one company (the organisation which housed the learning centre on one of the industrial estates) and to explore the impact of the intervention, first in terms of the organisation itself and second in terms of its wider impact on the industrial estate.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

John Berkeley

The third in a series examining the essential building blocks increating a learning culture. Explores the fitness for purpose of theNational Record of Achievement (NRA) as…

Abstract

The third in a series examining the essential building blocks in creating a learning culture. Explores the fitness for purpose of the National Record of Achievement (NRA) as a vehicle for adult learning and development, considers how it might be adapted to fulfil its purpose and identifies a range of opportunities for introducing the use of the National Record in education partnership activities.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Paul Hager

There is much scepticism about the concept of lifelong learning within both the educational literature and the literature on work. Certainly, many work arrangements…

13892

Abstract

There is much scepticism about the concept of lifelong learning within both the educational literature and the literature on work. Certainly, many work arrangements discourage learning, let alone lifelong learning. Nevertheless, there are also work situations in which significant learning occurs. However, even in instances where work arrangements are more favourable for learning, there does not seem to be wide recognition that this is the case. This paper suggests that this reflects the fact that learning is widely misunderstood. The common‐sense view of learning as a product gives many types of learning a bad press, including learning at work and lifelong learning. However, when the process aspects of learning are given due attention, as in the emerging view of learning outlined in this paper, much learning, including informal workplace learning at its best, is accurately described as a form of lifelong learning.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Bill Johnston and Aileen Watson

This paper gives a succinct account of current debates in the literature on graduate attributes as they are related to employment and lifelong learning, and argues the…

1608

Abstract

This paper gives a succinct account of current debates in the literature on graduate attributes as they are related to employment and lifelong learning, and argues the limitations of a “key skills” agenda as a guide to curriculum practice. Development of a curricular innovation that addresses key skills, “integrative studies” at the Strathclyde University Business School, is described and located in a wider framework of work‐related facets that extend thinking beyond key skills. Those facets include the idea of a learning organisation and the concept of student identity formation. A research‐based approach to further development of the curriculum is outlined, which takes the experiences of students and the perceptions and practices of specific employers to be key influences.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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