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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

ELLI (European Lifelong Learning Initiative) (http://www.noesis.se:443/ll/elli/elli.html) was established in 1992 to help propagate ideas and actions in Lifelong Learning

Abstract

ELLI (European Lifelong Learning Initiative) (http://www.noesis.se:443/ll/elli/elli.html) was established in 1992 to help propagate ideas and actions in Lifelong Learning in Europe. Its offshoot WILL (World Initiative on Lifelong Learning) was established in December 1994 at the First Global Conference on Lifelong Learning to do the same thing at a global level. Both are membership organisations trying to make the most effective use of organisational and personal expertise from among their subscribers. We spoke to Norman Longworth, ELLI's Chief Consultant and former Director of Strategy, about its background and role.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Ortrun Zuber-Skerritt and Selva Abraham

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a conceptual framework for work-applied learning (WAL) that fosters the development of managers and other professionals as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a conceptual framework for work-applied learning (WAL) that fosters the development of managers and other professionals as lifelong learners and practitioner researchers – through reflective practice, action research, action learning and action leadership, for positive organisational change.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical framework is designed from a holistic, affective-socio-cognitive approach to learning, teaching, research and development. It is based on a phenomenological research paradigm and informed by aspects of various theories, including experiential learning theory, strengths-based theory, grounded theory and critical theory/realism.

Findings

Based on classical and recent literature and the authors’ extensive experience, the WAL model presented here is an effective and practical approach to management education, research and development. It is useful for present and future requirements of business, industry, government and society at large in this twenty-first century, and in pursuit of a world of equality, social justice, sustainable development and quality of life for all. This is because of the nature of the research paradigm, particularly its collaborative and emancipatory processes.

Originality/value

This paper provides a theoretical, pedagogical and methodological rationalisation for WAL. This model is particularly useful for developing individual, team and organisational learning and for cultivating managers – or professional learners generally – as practitioner researchers. These researchers may act as role models of collaborative action leadership in their organisations with a cascading effect. This paper therefore advances an incipient literature on practitioner researchers as action leaders.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Ortrun Zuber-Skerritt and Eva Cendon

The aim of this paper is to present an interview and postscript that examine the specific meaning, rationale, conceptual framework, assessment and teaching of critical…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present an interview and postscript that examine the specific meaning, rationale, conceptual framework, assessment and teaching of critical reflection in and on professional development in management and higher education from an action research perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is presented in the new genre of PIP (Zuber-Skerritt, 2009): Preamble – Interview – Postscript. The Preamble (P) sets out the background, purpose, structure and conduct of the interview (I), which addresses six probing questions and is followed by a Postscript (P) that reveals additional comments and reflections on the interview, and identifies learning outcomes and implications.

Findings

Reflective practice is essential for a deep approach to learning, research and professional development and it is a driving force to enable learners to be adequately equipped for constant and complex change in today's and tomorrow's turbulent world.

Research limitations/implications

The article is positioned to inspire further R&D in the current debate on urgently needed radical and rapid change in higher education for the twenty-first century.

Practical implications

As well as the article's practical suggestions about why and how to develop reflective learning/practice, the PIP conceptual model applied in this article offers a useful practical approach for researchers to explore self-ethnography through interviews.

Originality/value

Two conceptual models illustrate the essence of this article, providing practical help to academics and other professionals to advance reflective practice in research and learning.

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Judith Kearney and Ortrun Zuber‐Skerritt

This paper aims to: extend the concept of “The learning organization” to “The learning community”, especially disadvantaged communities; demonstrate how leaders in a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to: extend the concept of “The learning organization” to “The learning community”, especially disadvantaged communities; demonstrate how leaders in a migrant community can achieve positive change at the personal, professional, team and community learning levels through participatory action learning and action research (PALAR); and identify the key characteristics of a sustainable learning community.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper combines an innovative and creative methodology of PALAR and a new learning system designed by the Global University for Lifelong Learning (GULL).

Findings

A lack of cultural understanding on the part of government agencies contributes to a migrant community's socio‐economic disadvantage, e.g. high unemployment and crime rates, underachievement in education, exclusion from higher education. The Samoan community is a disadvantaged migrant group in Australia who were helped to help themselves to achieve positive change and quality learning in partnership with university researchers. The use of an enabling framework designed by GULL, mainly for developing countries, also proved to be an effective system for achieving personal and organizational learning in a disadvantaged community in Australia.

Practical implications

The findings represented in the conceptual models enhance understanding of the key principles and processes involved in an organizational learning project for sustainable development of a learning community.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers to evaluate and track the learning outcomes in a community applying the GULL system that is used successfully in about 40 developing countries, but has not yet been sufficiently researched and documented in a developed country.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2011

Richard Teare

The purpose of this paper is to outline the mission of the Global University for Lifelong Learning (GULL) in supporting work and community‐based learning.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the mission of the Global University for Lifelong Learning (GULL) in supporting work and community‐based learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explains the principles on which GULL's action learning system are based and outlines a typical starting point for work‐based learning.

Findings

The paper concludes by identifying the role of systemized action learning in support of the agenda for human resource development at Sandals Resorts International.

Practical implications

The paper indicates how a narrative‐based approach to learning at work can be used to reflect and improve on personal and organizational performance.

Originality/value

The paper relates the literature on action learning to its implementation in workplace and community settings.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Abstract

Details

Action Learning and Action Research: Genres and Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-537-5

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Abstract

Details

Action Learning and Action Research: Genres and Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-537-5

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Action Learning and Action Research: Genres and Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-537-5

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Richard Teare, Chandrarathne Bandara and Chandana (Chandi) Jayawardena

This paper aims to explains how rural communities in Sri Lanka are responding to the challenges of high unemployment and low household income in a post-conflict society…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explains how rural communities in Sri Lanka are responding to the challenges of high unemployment and low household income in a post-conflict society and to explore the possibilities for engaging rural communities in sustainable tourism development as part of their response.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines how the South Asian Academy for Good Governance (SAAGG) is using action learning to enable participants to better utilize the resources available to them. It also draws on discussions with community leaders about harnessing this approach to industry training and the resource challenges arising from the Government's strategy for in-bound tourism.

Findings

The following are outlined: a framework for self-directed development in rural communities; why rural communities with a long tradition of subsistence farming are reluctant to participate in tourism development; and a community-driven approach to sustainable tourism that could yield benefits for the whole community and at the same time, preserve the traditional way of life.

Practical implications

The paper highlights: an approach to capacity building that assists in the creation sustainable micro enterprise; and the need for innovative thinking and action to mobilize rural communities in support of Sri Lanka's drive to become a leading Asian tourist destination.

Social implications

The study provides an example of sustainable development that could be replicated by rural communities in other locations. It also identifies the pivotal role of rural community members in providing an authentic tourism experience for international tourists and poses some questions about the best way(s) to engage with this group.

Originality/value

Indigenous culture and traditional ways of learning are drawn on to explain how subsistence communities can develop and implement a business approach that enables them to achieve greater self-reliance and financial independence. The paper also draws on the views of community leaders who are actively involved in facilitating community-based learning and development.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Abstract

Details

Action Learning and Action Research: Genres and Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-537-5

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