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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Rania Mohammed Abdel Abdel Meguid

This paper aims to present a critical appraisal of Ghassan Kanafani’s short story “The Child Goes to the Camp” using the Appraisal Theory proposed by Martin and Rose…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a critical appraisal of Ghassan Kanafani’s short story “The Child Goes to the Camp” using the Appraisal Theory proposed by Martin and Rose (2007) in an attempt to investigate the predicament of the Palestinians who were forced to flee their country and live in refugee camps as well as the various effects refugee life had on them.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the Appraisal Theory, and with a special focus on the categories of Attitude and Graduation, the paper aims to shed light on the plight of refugees through revealing the narrator’s suffering in a refugee camp where the most important virtue becomes remaining alive.

Findings

Analysing the story using the Appraisal Theory reveals the impact refugee life has left on the narrator and his family. This story serves as a warning for the world of the suffering refugees have to endure when they are forced to flee their war-torn countries.

Originality/value

Although Kanafani’ resistance literature has been studied extensively, his short stories have not received much scholarly attention. In addition, his works have not been subject to linguistic analysis. This study presents an appraisal analysis of Kanafani’s “The Child Goes to the Camp” in an attempt to investigate how the author’s linguistic choices are key to highlighting the suffering of the Palestinians, especially children, in refugee camps.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

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Book part
Publication date: 5 June 2020

Aura Lounasmaa, Cigdem Esin and Crispin Hughes

This chapter discusses ethics in participatory photography with focus on refugee participants and informal refugee camp setting. The chapter draws on ethics in…

Abstract

This chapter discusses ethics in participatory photography with focus on refugee participants and informal refugee camp setting. The chapter draws on ethics in participatory photography projects elsewhere and especially the experiences of photographers who work with these methods. The context here is the Calais Jungle camp, where the authors worked with a group of participants, who were residents of the camp, over several months to encourage photographing and documenting life in the camp and beyond, and to work on life stories that can be drawn from and inspired by these photos. The project, and hence the ethics in our work, were framed by the experiences of the refugee participants, and so at all times the authors needed to navigate temporality, violence, state oppression, lack of resources, human rights violations, language barriers, religious and cultural differences, national and supranational immigration policies, shame, and more. This chapter discusses how the authors navigated these ethical issues, the limitations of the approaches and solutions they found, and the lessons they learned, which can be applied to research using participatory visual methods with refugees.

Details

Ethics and Integrity in Visual Research Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-420-0

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2018

Anesu Marume, James January and Julita Maradzika

Social capital is an essential determinant of health that contributes significantly to quality of life. Social capital has potential of improving the health and well-being…

Abstract

Purpose

Social capital is an essential determinant of health that contributes significantly to quality of life. Social capital has potential of improving the health and well-being of refugees. Refugees in Zimbabwe are confined to an isolation camp making social networks a necessity for survival and psychosocial support. The purpose of this paper is to identify if social capital has effects on wellness and well-being (quality of life) of individuals in a confined setting such as a refugee camp.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was conducted at Tongogara Refugee Camp, Zimbabwe. The World Bank Integrated Questionnaire on Social Capital was adjusted to develop data collection tools. The parameters of social capital, economic, social and cultural capital, were used as the framework of study.

Findings

A total of 164 respondents were interviewed (62.8 percent females). A total of 98 percent were affiliated to a religious group and 30 percent of the interviewees stated that at least one member of their household was on social media. Only 18 percent communicated with people in their home country and 75 percent used social media to create new links.

Practical implications

The various opportunities for psychosocial support that exist within refugee populations can be used to formulate interventions aimed at improving health and quality of life of refugees.

Originality/value

This paper offers insight into the effects of social capital on refugee health and quality of life among refugees in Zimbabwe.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

Sevasti-Melissa Nolas, Charles Watters, Keira Pratt-Boyden and Reima Ana Maglajlic

This review and theoretical analysis paper aims to bring together literatures of place, mobility, refugees and mental health to problematise the ways in which social…

Abstract

Purpose

This review and theoretical analysis paper aims to bring together literatures of place, mobility, refugees and mental health to problematise the ways in which social support is practised on the ground and to rethink its possibilities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on an interdisciplinary understanding of social support that focusses on the social networks and significant and intimate relationships that mitigate negative mental health and well-being outcomes. The authors explore the dialectic relationship between place and mobility in refugee experiences of social support.

Findings

The authors argue that, in an Euro-American context, practices of social support have historically been predicated on the idea of people-in-place. The figure of the refugee challenges the notion of a settled person in need of support and suggests that people are both in place and in motion at the same time. Conversely, attending to refugees’ biographies, lived experiences and everyday lives suggests that places and encounters of social support are varied and go beyond institutional spaces.

Research limitations/implications

The authors explore this dialectic of personhood as both in place and in motion and its implications for the theorisation, research and design of systems of social support for refugees.

Originality/value

This paper surfaces the dialectics of place and mobility for supporting refugee mental health from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2018

Miriam Kuttikat, Anita Vaillancourt and Michael Massey

The civil war prompted many Tamils to flee Sri Lanka as refugees. Several researchers have documented psychological distress and trauma among Sri Lankan Tamil refugees

Abstract

Purpose

The civil war prompted many Tamils to flee Sri Lanka as refugees. Several researchers have documented psychological distress and trauma among Sri Lankan Tamil refugees, but the literature lacks sufficient discussion of resilience among this population. Although Sri Lankan Tamil refugees have experienced conflict and loss, they have also demonstrated positive adaptation following these challenges. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study used an ecological approach, in which the effect of the environment on a person is regarded as significant, to explore resilience among Sri Lankan Tamils living in refugee camps in India.

Findings

Through a qualitative investigation of refugee experiences of war and camp life, the authors developed a conceptual framework for understanding individual and collective resilience among refugees.

Research limitations/implications

Additionally, the results of this study need to be interpreted with caution because participants were camp refugees, which may limit the applicability of these results with refugees who live in different settings.

Practical implications

The current research results show that intervention programs should have multiple components, including trauma intervention to address the individual and community psychological and psychiatric effects of war and migration experiences and psychosocial interventions to address individual, family, community dynamics and daily stressors.

Social implications

The study participants stated that Sri Lankan Tamil refugees are using their resilience traits including will power, positive talk, practical solutions, social support, religion and social networks to remake their broken souls.

Originality/value

Future studies need to be conducted with other refugee group to validate the findings of the paper.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 October 2021

Ragnhild Dybdahl, Torgeir Sørensen, Hans A. Hauge, Kjersti Røsvik, Lars Lien and Ketil Eide

There is substantial research on the experiences, needs and well-being of unaccompanied refugee adolescents, but less is known about existential aspects of their lives

Abstract

Purpose

There is substantial research on the experiences, needs and well-being of unaccompanied refugee adolescents, but less is known about existential aspects of their lives. The purpose of the current study is to explore existential meaning-making among unaccompanied refugee children.

Design/methodology/approach

The informants in this study are young unaccompanied refugees (n = 30) living in Norway, and young Norwegians (n = 46). The authors undertook a secondary analysis of in-depth qualitative refugee interview data and a quantitative analysis of questionnaire data from Norwegian informants.

Findings

Both the refugee youths and the Norwegian youths expressed that social relationships and connections to others were most important for meaning. Moreover, both groups emphasized the importance of relatedness and generativity, i. e. commitment to worldly affairs beyond one’s immediate needs. The main differences between the two groups were related to the significance attached to religion and to loneliness.

Research limitations/implications

The comparison between the two groups is only possible to some degree. Secondary analyses have some limitations, as well as strengths.

Practical implications

The findings may be useful for supporting young refugees, as they provide insights into less-studied aspects of their lives.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in the focus on and broad interpretation of meaning, of secondary data analyses, and of comparisons between youths that are refugees versus non-refugees.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Book part
Publication date: 18 June 2020

Shusneha Sarkar

According to a report by the Afghan embassy in Delhi, refugees from Afghanistan, estimated at around 30,000 families, have, over the past two and a half decades, fled from…

Abstract

According to a report by the Afghan embassy in Delhi, refugees from Afghanistan, estimated at around 30,000 families, have, over the past two and a half decades, fled from their home towns due to large-scale conflicts, seeking safety in India's capital city. Many outsiders call Delhi home, but the Afghan people can claim a special relationship with India and her capital. To understand why, we must recall the history, both the ancient and the modern, of the two nations. There are nearly 11,000 Afghan refugees registered with the UNHCR in India, mainly living in Delhi and bordering areas. The refugees in Delhi face considerable hardships and difficulties. The Indian government and UNHCR should make it a priority to protect these Afghan refugees. While recognition of UNHCR-recognized China and Afghan refugees is greatly appreciated, the Indian government must be sensitive and sensitize others about their situation in Delhi and ensure timely attainment of recognition, registration, residential permits and exit permits without unnecessary cost or delay or corruption. The resettlement program must also be expanded and prioritized for Afghan refugees living in Delhi, particularly within large resettlement countries such as the US without any discrimination based on culture, language or religion. Without adequate and timely protection mechanisms and proper community support structures in place, the protection and assistance to the vulnerable section of society would be hard to attain and resolve.

Details

Refugee Crises and Third-World Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-191-2

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2019

Satwika Rahapsari and Ellen Schelly Hill

The purpose of this paper is to to understand Burmese refugees’ resilience in the USA, as well as to explore the potential contributions of arts- or movement-based…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to to understand Burmese refugees’ resilience in the USA, as well as to explore the potential contributions of arts- or movement-based interviews (movement elicitation (ME)) to the exploration of the immigration experience.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study was used for this pilot study (n=3), with verbal interviews combined with a ME procedure. ME is guided expressive movement that is engaged within verbal interviews. Utilizing ME involved probing interview responses to clarify and deepen the themes related to the resilience of Burmese refugees. Further, thematic analysis was conducted to identify themes within the interviews as related to the resilience of Burmese refugees.

Findings

Eight themes emerged from analysis of verbal interviews. Four themes pertained to adversities faced during the resettlement experience: financial and employment-based problems; racial issues and discrimination; challenges in adjustment and acculturation; and rough, unsafe neighborhoods. Four themes described the elements promoting Burmese refugees’ resilience: acquiring functional skills; drawing upon personal qualities; finding a sense of identity in family and beliefs; and accepting social support.

Originality/value

This study describes the resilience of refugees from Burma in the USA, with additional focus on how body and movement may serve as resources for coping, and thus provides information on the development of a framework for mental health assessment and intervention during refugees’ integration in their resettlement country.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2010

Giorgia Doná

The paper analyses four different perspectives on well‐being: the medical viewpoint and the hegemony of trauma, the cultural approach and the balance of social, spiritual…

Abstract

The paper analyses four different perspectives on well‐being: the medical viewpoint and the hegemony of trauma, the cultural approach and the balance of social, spiritual and natural realms, the psycho‐social position and the scrutiny of the social environment, and multi‐levelled ecological models that integrate multiple layers. The paper advocates a shift away from analyses of localities/phases/contexts and well‐being towards those of processes, predicated on the separation of physical dis(re)‐locations from psychological dis(em)‐placements. When examining processes and negotiations with life events, of which displacement is one, well‐being is understood as a process of being ‘of’ rather than being ‘in’.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2008

Katie Vasey and Lenore Manderson

The lives of refugee and immigrant populations have become central to often intense debates about cultural differences and their implications for multicultural societies…

Abstract

The lives of refugee and immigrant populations have become central to often intense debates about cultural differences and their implications for multicultural societies. The cultural practices assumed to be characteristic of such populations are the object of media comment and policy initiatives, and preoccupy social service practitioners daily. Drawing on an ethnographic examination of the everyday experiences of Iraqi refugees in a small regional town in Victoria, Australia, this article explores how social service practitioners address cultural difference as they seek to assist and support integration. The wider implications of emphasising cultural difference as a defining feature in determining and evaluating refugee integration are also explored. We argue that this emphasis fails to address structural inequalities that contribute to common forms of exclusion and marginalisation experienced by refugees and immigrants in Australia. This emphasis also risks contributing to what, in recent times, has become a dangerous stereotyping of refugees.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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